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Old 07-27-2012, 07:54 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,104 posts, read 34,533,299 times
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The only baseball cards to collect as an investment are the pre-WWI cards. Those are the only rare and desirable ones to a real collector.

As to the younger sports cards, only collect them if you are a fan of those teams and players. Their value is only sentimental, not monetary. And the companies that made them, made a ton of them... for profit. And there are just too many of these cards made for them to ever be considered rare and monetarily valuable.

Just as Beanie Babies will never be as valuable as an old Barbie Doll...
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Old 07-28-2012, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,891,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansky View Post
What's your opinion on the future value of sports cards? I have a ton of baseball and basketball cards from the mid 80's to the mid 90's that are taking up a ton of closet space. The sports card bubble burst in the mid 90's and I've found that cards have little or no market value today (judging by Ebay and Craigslist). I'm curious if maybe 20 or 30 years from now there might be a comeback and people will want these collectibles. Are they worth hanging on to, or should I just toss them? Thoughts?
I pick up bags, boxes, crates full of cards at garage sales and generally for on average pay $1 for 500 cards. Even if they have been cherry picked by an average collector who may know what he is looking for I will still find a handful that are worth a few bucks.
I just put them on ebay and start the bidding at 1 cent and $1.50 shipping so after the first sale the next 499 cards give me $1 profit on each one. Figuring envelope, stamp and card sleeve my only cost, of course ebay and paypal fees also. The last batch I put on got a few extra bucks on a couple of the cards.
I had put the whole bunch on at once at a good price at one time but no hits that way.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:46 AM
 
16,508 posts, read 20,906,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
It's a bad era. The sports card boom of the mid-1980s caused all the manufacturers to go overboard for the next decade or so which simply flooded the market and killed collectibility.
Duster1979 is right. By the time 1990 came around there were a couple dozen kinds of cards out there.

There was another thing here that IMO started the slide, and that was the 1994 Major League baseball strike. From what I observed in the area that I lived in during that time is that if you were a store that carried just cards you better have a loyal clientele, have a sweet deal regarding commercial rent, etc.

The businesses that were able to soldier through diversified their inventory and carried ALL things sports related; jerseys, pennants, ball caps, jackets, etc. If you were just a card shop however, you had problems. Now the collectors who stayed active with football, hockey, and b-ball cards might have kept things going, but there was some resentment that eventually turned into disinterest with baseball fans, not so much with the strike per se, but the cancellation of the rest of the season. And no World Series. To long time baseball fans, that scenario would be just unthinkable, but it happened.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 07-28-2012 at 05:08 PM..
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Old 07-29-2012, 05:33 PM
 
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This is just my opinion.....the steroids issue has really hurt many of the 80's and 90's cards that would otherwise still hold some value.

Clemens, McQuire, Bonds, etc were all still selling for O.K. money but have really dived since the steroids issue. If the HOF ever decides to vote them in will it cause a bounce?

I dunno. I'm glad I sold a bunch of my Bonds rookies years ago but wish I had dumped the rest then.
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Old 07-29-2012, 07:32 PM
 
32,532 posts, read 30,546,448 times
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Question: Do cards, say pre-1965, have to be in primo condition to have any value?

I know the cards we put in our bike spokes yes we did that have none but I'm wondering about cards that show wear from being handled.
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Old 07-30-2012, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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I have some that are in the original packaging that were never opened. Maybe.
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I have some that are in the original packaging that were never opened. Maybe.
Linicx, as far as I'm concerned they would go for a premium. 80's and early 90's baseball cards that have sealed packs certainly would be worth something more than the common card price, what amount that would be I'm not sure. If I get time when I'm through doing my modding thing, I'm going to check into that. If you're talking sealed packs from the late 50's-early 60's, you'd be talking about some hefty coin. One doesn't know what's in those packs!
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:12 PM
 
16,508 posts, read 20,906,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post

I know the cards we put in our bike spokes yes we did that have none but I'm wondering about cards that show wear from being handled.
Heh heh, regarding sticking a closepin with the card to my bicycle spokes, yep, used to do that to just ONE player-Bill Mazeroski! Yep, as a kid I was a big Mickey Mantle fan!
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Old 08-03-2012, 04:19 PM
 
16,508 posts, read 20,906,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Question: Do cards, say pre-1965, have to be in primo condition to have any value?
I've been kind of inactive regarding card shows the last several years and I don't buy online (cards anyway) but I'm gonna find out in the next couple months as there will be a couple card shows I plan on attending. Obviously condition is key with good gloss on the card, 4 sharp corners, near perfect photo centering, etc.

IMO pre-65 is about right. Topps started increasing the inventory around 1968 or so. Even the card store where I'm at is pretty deficient in quality vintage cards, both baseball and football. Over the last several years there has been an increase in popularity in autographs. But that's just my area. When I collected the most was mid to late '80's and cards in VG to E condition sold reasonably well.

The one thing about cards though is the price spread. Like coins, rare records, etc., there is a wider gap between Fair to Good, Very Good to Excellent, and Mint than ever before.
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Old 09-21-2012, 12:04 AM
 
1,623 posts, read 4,323,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
The only baseball cards to collect as an investment are the pre-WWI cards. Those are the only rare and desirable ones to a real collector.

As to the younger sports cards, only collect them if you are a fan of those teams and players. Their value is only sentimental, not monetary. And the companies that made them, made a ton of them... for profit. And there are just too many of these cards made for them to ever be considered rare and monetarily valuable.

Just as Beanie Babies will never be as valuable as an old Barbie Doll...
So many high graded pre-WWI cards have been altered or trimmed that it is an absolute minefield to enter that part of the hobby. I rarely ever saw high graded pre-1940's cards in the 1980's and now you see them everywhere because restoration and trimming is so common and easy to do. Every old card with sharp corners or edges is suspect.

A trimmed card is only worth maybe 10% of what a near mint vintage card, so you can lose a lot of money real quick and a disincentive for new collectors to collect vintage cards as the older collectors start dying off.
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