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Old 05-12-2012, 06:17 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,935 posts, read 22,192,854 times
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And then in about 3 or 4 centuries it will be appreciated again. Of course by then most of what could have been preserved, will be gone.

I kind of wish Stanley Steamers were a dime a dozen, though, I have to confess, because I'd love one of those.
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
And then in about 3 or 4 centuries it will be appreciated again. Of course by then most of what could have been preserved, will be gone.

I kind of wish Stanley Steamers were a dime a dozen, though, I have to confess, because I'd love one of those.
You go that right.... the ones I saw were all over $100K, restored. I always wondered if you could drive them on the street, legally. Not to digress too badly, I had a professor that drove a Model T to work (which I think technically he wasn't allowed to do), as I thought the rules for old antiques were "to and from a garage, or weekends and holidays" but I am sure my info is dated. The acetylene headlights were awesome, but if you got hit by a modern vehicle, you were toast. Also 45 mph tops is a little bit dangerous on modern roads. Nothing like having to adjust the spark advance yourself. My grandmother threw her back out cranking one.
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Old 05-13-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
You go that right.... the ones I saw were all over $100K, restored. I always wondered if you could drive them on the street, legally. Not to digress too badly, I had a professor that drove a Model T to work (which I think technically he wasn't allowed to do), as I thought the rules for old antiques were "to and from a garage, or weekends and holidays" but I am sure my info is dated. The acetylene headlights were awesome, but if you got hit by a modern vehicle, you were toast. Also 45 mph tops is a little bit dangerous on modern roads. Nothing like having to adjust the spark advance yourself. My grandmother threw her back out cranking one.
Yeah, way out of my price range. The Stanley Steamer could go quite fast. I'd probably break down and add seatbelts to the thing though, I can't imagine doing the speeds they're capable of in those low seats and no seat belt in front of a metal steering wheel. I'm not really sure what the rules on antique cars are, but I do see enough of them being driven all the time in the summer. I even saw a Model T being driven at night with the acetylene headlights last summer. Acetylene lamps are fun.

I once crank started a friend's 1947 Jeep (early Jeeps had a detachable crank in case the electric starter failed). That is a pretty "exciting" way of starting.
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:34 PM
 
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Not to totally hijack this thread, but it is going well...

One thing that sort of creeped me out, was the gas gauge on a '30s Ford, that was just a simple vertical glass tube from the gas tank, in the passenger's compartment, that showed the level of gas in the tank. Now THAT was safe.
The simple brakes weren't known for their stopping ability, either.
Though the water temperature gauge at the front of the hood looked really cool.
The vacuum-operated windshield wipers needed some technology advances, as they went really slow up the hill, and really fast down the hill.
But, overall, you can't knock what was a classic in its day. I'd collect boatload of them if I had more garage stalls.
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Old 05-15-2012, 09:13 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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Yeah, the old cars' safety features left a little to be desired. Now, if they could combine the good looks and mechanical simplicity of those old cars, with modern safety features, that would be nice...

No problem with a little drift in my thread, I love chatting antiques.
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:36 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,305,296 times
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Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Yeah, the old cars' safety features left a little to be desired. Now, if they could combine the good looks and mechanical simplicity of those old cars, with modern safety features, that would be nice...

No problem with a little drift in my thread, I love chatting antiques.
I used to be able to take a '60's chevy entirely apart with just 7,8, and 9 sixteenths wrenches. Then, in a moment of weakness (well it DID perform exactly as advertised, and I could go from Boston to Rochester in about 4 hours ), I went and got a Porsche 928. The repair manuals were a stack of books about 5 feet long, and when they stated 'use tool J185 to remove bracket L21', I knew it was going to be a mess. Having to pull the motor to change a water pump almost did it for me. What ultimately did it for me was when the serpentine belt (about 7 feet long) had the idler pulley fail, I then had 32 paper weights (or valves that were good for going around corners). Interference engine. That one hurt.
Give me a SBC, BBC, a timing light, and I am set to go. Not sure that youngsters nowadays even know what a Holley double-pumper is, or a Detroit Locker, or a 6-71 blower. But we could make ridiculous horsepower. But now my interests are in the Bonnie-and-Clydes. (though the suicide doors scare me a little).
I still keep digressing.
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Old 05-18-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,935 posts, read 22,192,854 times
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I don't even attempt to work on my modern car. Too many electronics and such to worry about. I've been stranded, dead in the road, a few times simply because some sensor went. If I had the time and a shop to work in I'd have gotten a Model T fixer upper I saw last year cheap.

To sort of get back on topic, I got the mantle fork and valve knob done. Just need to wait for a #3 font so I can get it burning.
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:10 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,935 posts, read 22,192,854 times
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Finally got it burning. It makes an impressive bunsen flame. I improvised a mantle with a Coleman #95 double tie mantle. It should be brighter but until I get a proper mantle, it will do.



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