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Old 02-19-2013, 07:00 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,586 posts, read 23,117,825 times
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Well those are my interests and I was wondering if there were any others who prowl thrift shops, antique stores, estate sales, garage yard and church sales for these items?

If so, which ones? What draws you to this time frame? What amazing finds have you stumbled upon in your search and how do you incorporate these items or furniture into your decor?

I use what is usable, unless the item is meant to be ornamental.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,309 posts, read 59,585,988 times
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I started collecting American-made dinnerware and Ohio-made pottery about 30 years ago. I have no idea how or why; I lived close to a thrift shop and started prowling it on a regular basis, I guess. Next thing I knew I was prowling every thrift shop between Lexington and Columbus.

I have about 10-12 sets of dinnerware of varying sizes, including Fiesta that I inherited from my mother-in-law, LuRay Pastels, two or three patterns from Salem China and Royal China, some Stetson, a set from a California pottery Vernon Kilns, Knowles, Hall ... Too much, really. LOL

Here's a cool website for you to prowl:

American Dinnerware made along the Ohio River Valley

There also are some great books on American-made dinnerware, Fiesta, American art pottery, etc., that are well worth purchasing.

I also have an embarrassingly huge collection of current Fiesta. My china closet is overloaded! The Homer Laughlin factory store in Newell, W.Va., is certainly worth the drive. I've been there more times than I care to think about ...
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Old 03-05-2013, 03:11 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,914,265 times
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Great web site OG!
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Old 03-05-2013, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,938 posts, read 45,376,262 times
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I have A LOT of McCoy and Weller and a few others. I was collecting matte glazed green, white and blue Ohio pottery for a long time, and now have more than I can put out. The simple old hominess of it is what draws it to me, and it was usually pretty inexpensive to buy. I have a great set of huge Weller yellowware bowls, too. Now that I don't cook for a crowd anymore, I hardly ever get to use them, but I just like looking at them.

I also have a bunch of old white ironstone that I use with my everyday Blue Willow.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,184 posts, read 12,573,898 times
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I remember browsing on ebay about 10 years ago and somehow I ended up seeing some Fiestaware. I had never heard of it, but I loved many of the colors, so I bought a few sets (gray, jupiter, and I don't remember what else). Once I bought and used them, I bought more ... and more ... and more! So I started out an "accidental collector," but now I can't seem to resist buying the new color in the 4-piece set as soon as it comes out.

At my previous house, when I remodeled the kitchen 3 years ago I included several glass-door wall cabinets. I loved how the Fiesta looked stacked in those cabinets. I will be remodeling the kitchen at my current house in a few years, and I will get the same cabinets.

I love using Fiesta when I have guests. It may sound silly but I just like how the table & sideboard look with all the different colors. Now I understand how people get obsessed with DISHES! (Someone actually made a DVD about Fiesta collectors -- I thought it was kind of snarky but interesting!)
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Old 03-05-2013, 08:40 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,307,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
I remember browsing on ebay about 10 years ago and somehow I ended up seeing some Fiestaware. I had never heard of it, but I loved many of the colors, so I bought a few sets (gray, jupiter, and I don't remember what else). Once I bought and used them, I bought more ... and more ... and more! So I started out an "accidental collector," but now I can't seem to resist buying the new color in the 4-piece set as soon as it comes out.

At my previous house, when I remodeled the kitchen 3 years ago I included several glass-door wall cabinets. I loved how the Fiesta looked stacked in those cabinets. I will be remodeling the kitchen at my current house in a few years, and I will get the same cabinets.

I love using Fiesta when I have guests. It may sound silly but I just like how the table & sideboard look with all the different colors. Now I understand how people get obsessed with DISHES! (Someone actually made a DVD about Fiesta collectors -- I thought it was kind of snarky but interesting!)
Just remember that certain colors of Fiesta ware have some 'interesting' materials in their glazing (primarily the vintage pieces). Like uranium dioxide and lead. Do a web search. I would never serve food on many of them. You should have posted this earlier... I gave away piles of it, from the parent's estate... and you could have had it. (I think it made GoodWill happy).
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:17 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 30,310,140 times
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Huh interesting, I ran across a couple of pieces of fiestaware this weekend. Picked them up for pennies.

I like collecting and selling early and mid 20th century glass pretty much anything before 1960.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,309 posts, read 59,585,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
Once I bought and used them, I bought more ... and more ... and more! So I started out an "accidental collector," but now I can't seem to resist buying the new color in the 4-piece set as soon as it comes out.
It's a disorder. It should be in the DSM-IV (or whatever version they're on now!). LOL

Quote:
It may sound silly but I just like how the table & sideboard look with all the different colors. Now I understand how people get obsessed with DISHES!
Another friend of mine began collecting about the same time I did. Once she asked me, rather hesitantly: "Do you ever just play with your dishes? Because I like to ..."

Boy Howdy, do I! LOL I have tablecloths that match all of my various sets of dishes, and my dining room table is always set.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
Just remember that certain colors of Fiesta ware have some 'interesting' materials in their glazing (primarily the vintage pieces). Like uranium dioxide and lead.
Only the pre-WWII red Fiesta used uranium oxide, and the level of radioactivity is negligible. Any Fiesta made after 1943 -- when the U.S. government ended civilian use of uranium -- does not contain uranium oxide.

Although there's really no reason to, I just don't eat off the one old red Fiesta plate that I have.

Lead I don't worry about at all when using antique dinnerware.
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Old 03-06-2013, 05:48 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 6,307,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
It's a disorder. It should be in the DSM-IV (or whatever version they're on now!). LOL

Another friend of mine began collecting about the same time I did. Once she asked me, rather hesitantly: "Do you ever just play with your dishes? Because I like to ..."

Boy Howdy, do I! LOL I have tablecloths that match all of my various sets of dishes, and my dining room table is always set.


Only the pre-WWII red Fiesta used uranium oxide, and the level of radioactivity is negligible. Any Fiesta made after 1943 -- when the U.S. government ended civilian use of uranium -- does not contain uranium oxide.

Although there's really no reason to, I just don't eat off the one old red Fiesta plate that I have.

Lead I don't worry about at all when using antique dinnerware.
DU has been used in enamel glazes as recent as the year 2000, though not in Fiesta ware. For the old red FW, 3 mR/hr is not exactly irrelevant, but at least no where as bad as pitchblende. But having lived in NH years ago, we were used to alpha emitters anyway ;-)
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Europe
1,618 posts, read 1,266,995 times
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Thanks for posting the website I do not collect myself but I always enjoy looking at all sorts of dinnerware.

I sometimes browse at www.replacements.com/
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