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Old 02-09-2008, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,819 posts, read 32,448,417 times
Reputation: 11872

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Does anyone here collect and restore antique furniture? I sure could use some advice from someone with knowlege and experience on a lot of issues.

Right now I am trying to re-attach a table top that the screws stripped out.
There are large long screws (about two and a half to three inches). The table is oak and the screws go into a wooden column that is slightly less than an inch thick (maybe an inch).

What is the best way to secure these screws? I considered gluing in dowels and drilling them out then re-screwing the screws into place, but when I did that before the wood split and ruined the thing I was putting screws into (Door jamb). I think that there is some glue type stuff that you put in, let dry and then drive the screws into it. Not sure if it works.

Anyone know?
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Old 02-09-2008, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 18,781,445 times
Reputation: 3694
I've collected old American furniture for about 40 years, and in the past I've repaired these myself. In the 60s I apprenticed on weekends with a knowledgeable restorer. More recently, I've asked for some help.

You might try one of two things: stainable Elmer's wood glue, or natural single or double process wood-fill.

Wood fill might give it more support. Fill slowly, and allow complete drying before attempting drilling another hole or putting in another screw.

And something else to consider is re-enforcing all the legs with a small shim, brace or block. It would raise the table slightly, but if the leg is experiencing wobble, it may be the best way to go.

And if you can take a picture, I might have some other ideas.
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Old 02-09-2008, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,468 posts, read 15,981,026 times
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I tried Gorilla glue-lol- the Lowe's guy said it would hold the best----it doesnt though. I will have to take a picture of my great aunts sewing table; need to repair the curved foot- impossible to find........
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Old 02-09-2008, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 18,781,445 times
Reputation: 3694
Gorilla glue is a fad, I think!

Old Elmer is the guy to take the worries out of re-enforcement, although other glues are out there (I have about 50 different kinds).

Gluing, however, is not the only issue: you need to brace and clap the two pieces you are putting together: pressure for 24-48hrs is recommended.
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