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Old 08-09-2009, 02:04 PM
 
Location: hampton roads
68 posts, read 155,797 times
Reputation: 68

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjg1963 View Post
There was a neighbor lady who passed away a few years ago. She was in her late 90s. She lived alone in an old Victorian. When she died, she apparently only had a nephew who was close enough to take care of her estate. When he cleaned out the house he rented a big roll away dumpster. All us neighbors knew this lady and knew she had a lot of history in her house, not just personal but related to the town also. This nephew threw out everything. I'm not ashamed to say that we all had a dumpster diving party the next day. The old family photos from the 1800's and the little hotel soap dish stamped "1929 West Virginia" and all the memorabilia from the local firehouse dating to the 1920s was rescued. He threw away his family's history and a lot of valuable china, cast iron toys, and fine leather equestrian items (a whole saddle!). I had my little soap dish appraised at $60 and one of the first View Master stereoscopes at $75. I was able to donate her photos to the local historical museum as many of them were of the old Main Street, the old fire house, and the Laurel Race Track (horses).

Some people treasure history and others just consider it junk. I'm glad many of us neighbors weren't too proud to jump in that dumpster. We found some real treasures.
I'm proud of you and your neighbors. You swallowed pride to do the right thing. AND if that old lady could see what you did it made her smile. I am truly sad that this is what people think of what was important to friends and loved ones. I was very close to my grandmother who lived less than a block from me. I (and my sons)spent several days a week with her and nearly every night on the phone. When she died her daughter (antique dealer) went through everything, which ended up liquidated or with her daughters and grandchildren. I wish I had a coffe cup she drank out of, or her handkerchief. AND I know she wanted that too. We all learn lessons in life and I got many from Gramma. I will specifically hand something important/sentimental to my sons and the rest will be unimportant as far as disposal.
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Old 08-09-2009, 07:09 PM
 
16,487 posts, read 21,037,970 times
Reputation: 16171
I don't collect anything weird, but I do find it kind of interesting the strange things some people do collect. I often wonder why and usually they have a reasonable explanation. It just shows we are all individuals and all have different interests.
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Old 08-14-2009, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Maryland
34 posts, read 94,662 times
Reputation: 61
I collect Hess trucks. Have every year since 1974.
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Old 08-14-2009, 09:40 PM
 
27 posts, read 113,038 times
Reputation: 30
Default No meaning! Vanity, at its best...

The mentality, the reason or so called reason is seriously vain. These people are trapped in a world of wanting worthless junk manufactured just to get peoples hard earned money. If people would dig deep and educate themselves the way marketing and sales people do everyone could see how bad this really is. But, the bottom line is; it is your responsibility to know if you really need that “thing” or not and why you think you “need” it!

About 7 years ago I did an experiment. It revealed a lifetime of wrong doing and valuable information. I live in an apartment with an extra bedroom. I took all things and I mean ALL, down to bare walls (took nails, screw out too) and bare floors an put all of these things into the spare bedroom. I stress this, WHEN I NEEDED something I stopped and thought is this something I have to have to survive or is this something I just want. If it was something I truly needed I moved it back into its original place, ie: cutting board, knife, spoon, fork, plate. Ok, now after about six months I had so little in the main living space of the apartment it shocked me. Out went all the other stuff as donations. Now, the problem here is many people are going to compromise the idea they need tv and internet and computer and so on. See what I am saying. YOU DON”T NEED THAT stuff. I am using library computer and internet. Give your junk away and feel the freedom. Move out into the country. Enjoy peace, freedom and nature. When you don’t have anything you are free to do anything!
[SIZE=4] [/SIZE]

Last edited by Urth; 08-14-2009 at 09:42 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 08-17-2009, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Akron, Ohio
1,114 posts, read 2,438,103 times
Reputation: 1541
Check out the thread that I started, Estate Sales Where You Live...I've been collecting old game boards, for the art and lithography style of them...besides, this is what people used to do before 200 cable channels of nothing.
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:14 PM
 
2,890 posts, read 5,375,178 times
Reputation: 4610
Default Take a picture - it'll last longer

I pulled out all my old crap and took photos of those items that meant something to me. I realized that it wasn't the item - it was the memories that the item triggered. There are very few things the I kept, as they have little value to anyone else. I did keep an old stuffed animal, but I pulled the stuffing out of it - it was rock hard and smelled wierd.

I just dumped the photos on a few jump drives and toss them in the computer anytime I want to walk down memory lane.
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Old 10-26-2009, 11:38 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,837,479 times
Reputation: 1237
Kudos to Miss NM!

I've heard the younger generation isn't prone to this: not enough space in their economy to collect much unless they still live at "home"...

I think it's an escape mechanism...Like piles of projected excuses...I'm projecting, of course...
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Old 10-27-2009, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,777 posts, read 7,118,113 times
Reputation: 2834
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw740er View Post
I'm proud of you and your neighbors. You swallowed pride to do the right thing. AND if that old lady could see what you did it made her smile. I am truly sad that this is what people think of what was important to friends and loved ones. I was very close to my grandmother who lived less than a block from me. I (and my sons)spent several days a week with her and nearly every night on the phone. When she died her daughter (antique dealer) went through everything, which ended up liquidated or with her daughters and grandchildren. I wish I had a coffe cup she drank out of, or her handkerchief. AND I know she wanted that too. We all learn lessons in life and I got many from Gramma. I will specifically hand something important/sentimental to my sons and the rest will be unimportant as far as disposal.

My 87 year old mother survived southern Jim Crow, the Great Depression, WWII, losing her spouse, and now her health is failing fast. Her house is cluttered with items, few valuable, many damaged, but all meaningful to her...to the point of having paths through the stuff.
In my desperate attempts to balance keeping her safe and preserving her quality of life I try to keep her in care services that allow her to be close to her stuff while I go and clear vents, maintain utilities, and otherwise do damage control. She is afraid to throw anything away and the modern-day threats of identity theft heighten that depression -era frugality even more. The "things" she surrounds herself with make her feel safe and remind her of lost loves.
Through the years I have tried to gain her trust so she will allow me to sell the items I know to be of value and generate some much needed cash for her. Her OCD condition only allows her to let me do this sparingly. One ill-fated attempt involved a charitable care organization to provide a labor crew and a 30' dumpster. She agreed to this in writing, only to later say that she was ripped off. Most of the items she thinks are "gone" are simply covered under mounting stuff that she is still able to shuffle around the house. This is compounded by siblings and other family members that feel free to burden her with their item storage as well.
As will executor I know I will have a daunting task to liquidate all this stuff, but over time I have educated myself on the market value of real collectibles and resale items. There's a duality to the subjective , sentimental value that someone can place on a thing and the currency-driven market value of a thing. I'm hoping Mom's legacy will also include those tangible artifacts like WWII mementos that can enlighten an upcoming generation to the history and heroic lives of our previous generations.
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Old 10-27-2009, 07:40 AM
 
Location: In a house
21,956 posts, read 21,456,580 times
Reputation: 14918
It's just all so sad.....
When we did our huge move from one corner of the US to the other I cleaned out a lot of my things and gave them away. I came to the conclusion that I better do it now, myself, or eventually my children will have the burden. Yes, many items ment a lot to me but I still have those memories--those can't be taken away. Maybe now some of those items can become memories for someone else. The items I won't give away are those of my parents who have passed away or my dear grandmother. Those items will be passed on to my son and daughter. Those items are the ones that we can feel our passed family members touch and love in them.
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Old 10-31-2009, 01:01 AM
 
6,028 posts, read 13,106,474 times
Reputation: 6886
Sometimes it's helpful to hold on to things and pass things down for the preservation of a family's history. It's helpful to pass down the family stories if you have artifacts to go along with them. "These were grandpa Joe's guns... he collected them... they are antique and priceless. He fought in the war..." and so on...

And sometimes it might just be something that will increase in value over time. Something that families collect and keep over time as a sort of safety net for the families future - should something bad happen in the family, and they need money, they have these things that they can sell bit by bit to get by to get them through the rough times.

And sometimes it's just a packrat/hoarding problem.
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