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Old 05-17-2014, 09:28 PM
 
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Hello, I'm wondering if anyone has any information on Antique clocks? I've been searching the internet and other than very basic info or Pay-To-Read sites, I can't find much. I ask because I've recently fallen in love with antique clocks and have been finding them here and there. I've got about 7 now and my most recent acquisition is throwing me for a loop.... the only markings I can find on it is DAIA in bold across the face. It's a wood case wall clock and it chimes twice ding dong ( like a standard doorbell sound) for each strike. It chimes the hour and half hour. Anyone know anything about this? I'd be happy to give more info. Thanks so very much.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Venus
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I don't collect antique clocks per say but we buy junk & sell antiques. The one item that we do very well with are clocks. Years ago, we had a small wind-up Ansonia alarm clock-I think we dated it around 1860 or so-from the label. I couldn't find that model ANYWHERE. After putting it up on eBay several times and it didn't sell, I had really fallen in love with it and decided to keep it. We still have it.

Another one was a Sessions Fairhaven model that is not even listed in Sessions books. We put a price tag on it and put it out in our booth. The next day, we went back to the booth and took it home and hung it in our dinning room.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsGraham View Post
Hello, I'm wondering if anyone has any information on Antique clocks? I've been searching the internet and other than very basic info or Pay-To-Read sites, I can't find much. I ask because I've recently fallen in love with antique clocks and have been finding them here and there. I've got about 7 now and my most recent acquisition is throwing me for a loop.... the only markings I can find on it is DAIA in bold across the face. It's a wood case wall clock and it chimes twice ding dong ( like a standard doorbell sound) for each strike. It chimes the hour and half hour. Anyone know anything about this? I'd be happy to give more info. Thanks so very much.

The only DAIA I can find is Japanese-and the clocks look contemporary.

Sometimes Kovels website can be helpful. You do have to sign up to use it but it is free.



Cat
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Old 05-28-2014, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Griffin, Georgia
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I love retro clocks....not quite as old as what you're describing, but any made from the 1950s through the 80s. All the ones with trapezoid and square shapes, pretty colors, light-up faces at night and the sweep second hand. The brand names Ingraham, Westclox, and Sunbeam come to mind. It's almost an obsession with me; but not in a bad way. I love them because they do not need batteries and run like gangbusters (well, when the power flickers on and off it might slow them down a little, due to being electric....They are also esthetically MUCH MUCH more attractive looking than any cheap Chinese-made clock you'd find now at Wally World. My old GE retro 70s wall clock in that sage green color runs circles around clocks made today (No pun intended!!) And they were made in the USA!

Retro is truly the way to go!!

I also love the old soda name clocks (RC cola, Orange Crush,Sprite) many of which are illuminated, just makes you think of a fifties diner decoration or something from a service station.

I am a Gen-Xer who loves collectibles, including vintage clocks. Clocks from the 40s? 30s? 20s? Even older? The ones that you have to wind daily? Not so much my cup of tea, but to each his own.

Now as for grandfather and German cuckoo clocks....I do not own any, but I can appreciate the hard work that goes into their creation and construction. My late grandfather built his and it still stands (he was a carpenter.)

Just give me the old funky, mod, atomic-age, retro style of the 50s and 60s.
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,941 posts, read 45,385,657 times
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My parents had a 1645 Grandfather clock from England. It was a wedding gift from an uncle who was an antiques dealer. They had some restoration done to it in order to keep it from crumbling to the floor, so I don't know if that decreased the value or not. Anyway, its a beautiful thing, and it keeps good time. It was make by William Smith, which was our family name and my brother has it now. My brother has no children, so I don't know what will happen to it.

We bought an 1845 signed grandfather clock from Scotland, which is pretty, but if I had a buyer I'd sell it, since we've downsized and really don't have a good spot to put it, but I would miss the deep, mellow tick tock.
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Old 08-20-2014, 09:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I have collected antique clocks for several years. You have lots of options. One thing I learned is it is better to add clocks slowly and choose only exemplary ones that you will love than to buy a bunch of mediochre clocks and then wish for some really nice ones, but you no longer have any money.

A couple of intersting things i have found:

Wood Works Clocks from the early 1800s are really neat and relatively inexpensive. There is a guy in New Hampshire who will carve new gears if you need them.

French clocks are intricate hard to repair and maintain and finicky. If ou want clocks that run, stay away from French Clocks.

Electric clocks are pretty cheap and some are pretty neat. There was a guy on the West Coast (but not California. Oregon or Washington I think) who will re-wind electric motors for a reasonable price. Electrics are less popular and therefore usually less expensive.

I have a fairly extensive collection of Kit Cat clocks. people tended to put them in the kitchen and they got all gunked up and stopped. Often, you can fix them by simlpy taking them apart and cleaning them. They were made from the 1930s through about the 1960s and then some company started making crappy battery powered ones. And they still make them.

Mastercrafters and united made some really neat motion clocks in the 1950s and 1960s. The newer mastercrafter clocks had mostly plastic motors with a gear that has a 100% failure rate over time. The gear cannot be replaced, but thre was a company that made replacement motors for a while. I think they are gone, but the motors are still around sometimes. About 1/3 of the motors will be defective, so you need to get more than you need. Some of the mastercrafters movement clocks are fairly valuable ($400 - $700), most are worth $30-$50. Haddon also made some neat motion clocks.

There are thousands of reproduction clocks (usually made in china) and bastard clocks (clocks assembled from parts of several different antique clocks. These have little value. Some of the chinese reproductions are neat and valuable in their own right, but they are not well made. Some antique clocks have the works removed and replace with quartz movements. Those clocks have no value at all. Caveat Emptor.

Those chinese clocks are mostly sold by a guy in San Francisco and a guy in Ohio. I found the guy in Ohio more friendly and honest (Proclocks I think is the name, but not sure, it has been a while). His name is Bob and he spent hours on the telephne telling me about clocks. Both of them also sell antique clocks as well as reproductions. Both of them sell bastard clocks sometimes, one of them is very forthright about it being a bastard clock, the other - well he does not say it isn't a bastard clock and if you assume it is a legitimate antique clock, he can show you that he never said it was.

I boought a reproduction rolling clocks from Bob (you gotta have one of these). It was really neat but it brke and neither i nor any local repair place have been able to fix it.

Some clocks are unusual and super neat. For example Seth Thomas made a clock with a half dozen nestled bells in it rather than chime bars. It is neat to see how it works and sounds awesome. (Called Sonora Chime)

Some clocks keep track of day, date, month and time. Some include phases of the moon.

The Atomos clock runs on atmospheric changes. No springs, weights or power at all. They are really really expensive.

Personally I like weight driven clocks better than key wound. I cannot tell you why. One this is it is much more fun to draw the weights up than to wind a bunch of key wound clocks.

I did not read the whole thread to see whether someone suggested joining NAWCC. It is pretty boring most of the time, but you can learn a lot. I have not found/oined our local chapter since moving to Michigan, but I will eventually.

If you have chming clocks, set them a minute off from each other. Otherwise noon and midnight sounds like a peddler fell down your stairs. Two or three chming at once is neat. Fifteen or twenty at once is maddening.

Clocks do not have to run to be neat. Right now none of my clocks are running (most just becasue I do not wind them). They are still neat to look at.

One lesser known colelctable clock is the Oswald Dog Eye clocks (also owl skull and something else). There are a lot of fakes of these as well. The fakes are terrible quality.

FOr many years I kept all my clocks running. However running them does tend to wear them out, and you end up doing a lot more repriars. Now I just run them once in a while. There are a few I run all the time, but not all of them.

Another neat type are ships clocks. They chime the watch bells system rather than the 12 hour system. Usually, they are sealed against moisture, so I have one in the bathroom.

Clock collectors are everywhere these days, so it is unlikely you are going to find that $5000 big name maker clock at a flea market anymore. However I did have a friend find one in the trash.

Ebay is a good source for finding out the value of a clock. Ebay is not longer the place for bargains, but you will find market prices from the actual sales.

Prices jump all around. I have some clocks that were unpopular when I bought them and i got them for $30 apiece in a good deal. Then they got popular and many went up over $1000. Last I checked they had dropped back to around $100.

I have ignored my clocks for the past year or two. You have inspired me, I am going to go home and clean some up and get them running.

IF you ever get a chance to get a Herschede Grandfather clock for a decent price - buy it. Do not hesitate. I am still regretting past hesitation and looking for a nice herschede I can afford.

Learn to fix clocks. Or find a retired guy who does it as a hobby. Commercial clock stores will charge you more than the clock is worth most of the time.
I am not necessarily a collector but we do have a Herschede grandfather we bought in 1984 new. It was one of the last ones made before they closed in Starksville, MS. I think it is the Haverford model. We have had to spend some money to keep it running but , to me, it is worth it. I love the tube chimes and they make the rod chimes on the Howard Miller that I inherited from my parents sound awful. I drove an old car for longer than I wanted to pay for the Herschede. Unfortunately, the market for those has dipped and they don't seem to be commanding the prices they did before the Recession. The clock that I really would like to have is a Gazo wall clock. We could have had one of those for around $300-$400 before they became popular. They are a whole different style compared to the Herschede but I love the carving on them.
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Old 10-18-2014, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Message Board That's a link to the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors. They can't give you an estimate of value, but they can tell you anything else possible about clocks. They have a very useful group of folks who repair clocks, so if your clock doesn't run, they can help. If you need clock repair parts, then Timesavers can help.

For me, it all started with a $2 cuckoo clock at a yard sale on our honeymoon. It was in pieces, but all the pieces were there. It was like a 3D puzzle to get it all back together, but it's still on the wall running decades later. At one point, there were nine cuckoos on the wall working which made a huge cacophony on the hour. I gave a lot of them away as gifts one holiday season so now it's a bit quieter. There's still a pile of them left to fix but I need to set up my clock repair table again.

Prior to Germany losing the war and idiots in Washington setting them us in businesses (i.e. building the Hermle company in Germany) the best clocks were made in the U.S.A. However, once Hermle was made they could produce clockworks for a lot less than U.S. companies and that drove most of the U.S. clockmakers out of business. There's still a few left, but not many.

I've also heard the older Hershendes sounded better than the newer ones, although I've not had any to compare. I keep thinking I should get a pair of those expensive wind chimes that are tuned for Westminster and building a tall case clock around them. That would probably sound really nice.
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Old 02-08-2015, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
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Hi raram! I just found this thread, and I am a clock collector. I also do my own repairs. I am also a long-time member of NAWCC - I think you should absolutely join! One of the most fun things you can do is to go to some of the Regionals they hold, when one comes within driving distance to you. They are normally held in large rented halls, and TONS of people show up to buy and sell clocks, clock parts, clock repair tools, watches, and other things too numerous to mention. You can find out where the Regionals are being held before you join the NAWCC, just by going to the NAWCC website and poking around until you find the year's Regionals listings.
My fascination with clocks began as a child - we had an old Ansonia clock from post-civil war days. I would spend hours just watching it run!
Just trying to keep this conversation alive...
...Doug in Arizona
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Old 02-25-2015, 06:56 PM
 
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Thanks Doug

Haven't had much time for my clocks lately but think i'm going to make an effort to check things out
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:41 PM
 
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We purchased a Ansonia model Tunis clock,dated 1852 from Goodwill.The interesting part was a note taped to inside of back door.The note had the birth date and name of each owner as it was passed down in family starting in 1846 and ending in 1932.There are four owners listed.I would guess it was donated to Goodwill by family.
I cleaned and oiled it and works fine.Use clock oil and clock cleaner when servicing.
We have eight antique clocks and several others including an older Atmos clock which is unique.My wife likes her cuckcoo clocks.
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:15 PM
 
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Wow, can't believe this thread is still going strong since I first started it a few years ago. I haven't gotten any other clocks in the past couple years, but seeing this thread still going strong makes me think I'll start searching again. Thanks to all who've responded.
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