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Old 03-28-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
3,969 posts, read 3,635,874 times
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Will upper classmen be able to file grievances, if a lower classmen plays before them?
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Old 03-28-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC
2,532 posts, read 2,946,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ambient View Post
Neither are the so-called "student athletes." They are professional athletes, period. They are recruited by the university to play sports, upon which the university makes a lot of money. And they get a lot of perks for it, as well as dumbed down standards so that they can fake this premise that they are there for academic purposes (how many will even stay for four years?). At least this proposed arrangement starts to call a spade a spade. In truth, these professional contractors should not even be in the university setting. They should be in some extended leagues of professional sports organizations.
Where does it stop? Little League baseball shows up on ESPN networks. Those youth should get perks too. Right? High Schools recruited players in my old metro. Lebron played on ESPN in High School. Should they have been professionals as well?

Not all student-athletes are just there as a hold period for the NFL. Take Myron Rolle. He played for my alma mater, Florida State, all four years. He found time to finish his degree in 2.5 years. He was awarded a Rhodes scholarship (2008). He passed on the first draft available in order to go to Oxford University to get a masters of science in medical anthropology. He then went pro before retiring to go back to medical school. Note, he is just one of many examples of student-athletes who actually take their degrees seriously. There are more of these cases than there are of the Marcus Lattimore type player.

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Nothing would make me smile more than if these now employees at Northwestern have to start paying taxes on their private scholarships.
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Old 03-28-2014, 06:13 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
13,984 posts, read 10,928,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncopus99 View Post
Where does it stop? Little League baseball shows up on ESPN networks. Those youth should get perks too. Right? High Schools recruited players in my old metro. Lebron played on ESPN in High School. Should they have been professionals as well?

Not all student-athletes are just there as a hold period for the NFL. Take Myron Rolle. He played for my alma mater, Florida State, all four years. He found time to finish his degree in 2.5 years. He was awarded a Rhodes scholarship (2008). He passed on the first draft available in order to go to Oxford University to get a masters of science in medical anthropology. He then went pro before retiring to go back to medical school. Note, he is just one of many examples of student-athletes who actually take their degrees seriously. There are more of these cases than there are of the Marcus Lattimore type player.

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Nothing would make me smile more than if these now employees at Northwestern have to start paying taxes on their private scholarships.
It stops when the universities hold these "student" athletes to the same standards as they hold their actual students.

No scholarships to come in and just toss a ball around - need based or academically merit-based only.

No more lowering the bar so that dumb students but good athletes can get in and stay in and essentially learn nothing other than how to block and tackle.

Academic performance with the same rigor of expectations as for everyone else. No excuses.

All students fulfill their academic obligations to the fullest on an equivalent playing field, and then get involved with sports in their excess time. That's the order of prioritization.

I'd like to see how many of the current crop of professional athletes masking as students at Big 10 universities this would eliminate and what that would mean for the business of college sports.
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Old 03-28-2014, 08:06 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,995,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ambient View Post
It stops when the universities hold these "student" athletes to the same standards as they hold their actual students.

No scholarships to come in and just toss a ball around - need based or academically merit-based only.

No more lowering the bar so that dumb students but good athletes can get in and stay in and essentially learn nothing other than how to block and tackle.

Academic performance with the same rigor of expectations as for everyone else. No excuses.

All students fulfill their academic obligations to the fullest on an equivalent playing field, and then get involved with sports in their excess time. That's the order of prioritization.

I'd like to see how many of the current crop of professional athletes masking as students at Big 10 universities this would eliminate and what that would mean for the business of college sports.

You mean like NCAA Division III???
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
13,984 posts, read 10,928,441 times
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Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
You mean like NCAA Division III???
Precisely. Those people are students first, athletes second. Their sports organization is not premised on being a multimillion dollar industry. That is how athletics should operate in an institution whose mission is higher learning. If you want 18 year old pro athletes working with celebrity millionaire coaches together with all the trappings of media money, gambling, etc...It should be an extension of professional sports leagues. Having this kind of an industry cloaked inside a university with now unionize and soon to be paid "student" athletes is just grotesque and corrupt.
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:19 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,995,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ambient View Post
Precisely. Those people are students first, athletes second. Their sports organization is not premised on being a multimillion dollar industry. That is how athletics should operate in an institution whose mission is higher learning. If you want 18 year old pro athletes working with celebrity millionaire coaches together with all the trappings of media money, gambling, etc...It should be an extension of professional sports leagues. Having this kind of an industry cloaked inside a university with now unionize and soon to be paid "student" athletes is just grotesque and corrupt.

That is why I pretty much only attend Div-III and NAIA games. In general, those athletes are students first.

I am NOT saying that those programs are perfect but they generally do have their priorities straight.
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Old 03-30-2014, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,906,612 times
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There are some important things that need to be pointed out:

- The ruling applies to private schools only.
- Many states have restrictions on public employee unions.
- Many southern states (where CFB is king) are rabidly anti-union.

Students will be considered public employees, so when they are paid, their paychecks will have deductions for taxes, health insurance, pension/retirement, etc. Out of that paycheck, they will have to pay for all their life expenses, including: tuition to the university, rent, food, entertainment and more.

Let's say that a college pays each athlete $100,000.

First take salary reductions
$6,000 (estimated) Health Insurance
$5,000 - $8000 Public employee

Taxable salary is now: $89,000 - $86,000

Now subtract taxes:
$16,000 Federal
$4,500 Illinois state
$6,500 Social Security/Medicare

Athlete is left with $62,000
Tuition and Fees for Northwestern runs about $48,000

Not sure how much union dues would be.

Athlete is left with $14,000 for housing, food, entertainment, etc.

Athlete would be able to capitalize on his likeness for endorsements (only a few would be marketable enough to do this), but not be able to use the school's likeness, uniform, etc.

Important to note: a single person who earns that much will not qualify for financial aid.

Other questions I have:
If athletes are paid, could a person play football for free? I doubt it. The union would have issues with non-paid players "undercutting" the wages of paid players.

Could the NCAA institute a salary cap and a player limit? Probably so, most major pro sports have these.
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Old 03-31-2014, 08:00 AM
 
4,399 posts, read 9,059,476 times
Reputation: 2352
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
There are some important things that need to be pointed out:

- The ruling applies to private schools only.
- Many states have restrictions on public employee unions.
- Many southern states (where CFB is king) are rabidly anti-union.

Students will be considered public employees, so when they are paid, their paychecks will have deductions for taxes, health insurance, pension/retirement, etc. Out of that paycheck, they will have to pay for all their life expenses, including: tuition to the university, rent, food, entertainment and more.

Let's say that a college pays each athlete $100,000.

First take salary reductions
$6,000 (estimated) Health Insurance
$5,000 - $8000 Public employee

Taxable salary is now: $89,000 - $86,000

Now subtract taxes:
$16,000 Federal
$4,500 Illinois state
$6,500 Social Security/Medicare

Athlete is left with $62,000
Tuition and Fees for Northwestern runs about $48,000

Not sure how much union dues would be.

Athlete is left with $14,000 for housing, food, entertainment, etc.

Athlete would be able to capitalize on his likeness for endorsements (only a few would be marketable enough to do this), but not be able to use the school's likeness, uniform, etc.

Important to note: a single person who earns that much will not qualify for financial aid.

Other questions I have:
If athletes are paid, could a person play football for free? I doubt it. The union would have issues with non-paid players "undercutting" the wages of paid players.

Could the NCAA institute a salary cap and a player limit? Probably so, most major pro sports have these.
Who says they will pay tuition and fees to get a northwestern education,? It's not mandatory for other campus employees to actually attend northwestern, logically it wouldn't be mandatory for the northwestern players either.
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC
2,532 posts, read 2,946,399 times
Reputation: 1357
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
That is why I pretty much only attend Div-III and NAIA games. In general, those athletes are students first.

I am NOT saying that those programs are perfect but they generally do have their priorities straight.
Yeah because the small leagues don't do the same practices...
CIAA Championship Game Cancelled After Fight ~ HBCU GAMEDAY
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:02 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,995,588 times
Reputation: 20076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncopus99 View Post
Yeah because the small leagues don't do the same practices...
CIAA Championship Game Cancelled After Fight ~ HBCU GAMEDAY

That was NCAA Division II which offers scholarships. Note that the teams involved WERE sanctioned, something which happens rarely in Division I where the $$$$ are involved.
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