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View Poll Results: Which was the greatest play in college football history
Kick Bama Kick....Bama vs. Auburn, 2013 3 37.50%
The Play.....Cal vs. Stanford, 1982 5 62.50%
neither....another was (name it in post) 0 0%
Voters: 8. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-20-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Kick Bama Kick (Auburn vs. Alabama, 2013) vs. The Play (Cal vs. Stanford, 1982)......which one was the most remarkable and famous play in college football history?
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Old 10-20-2014, 03:16 PM
 
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I would say Cal v Stanford. The band being on the field and the laterals etc. make that play tough to beat.
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Old 10-20-2014, 04:19 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,194,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rggr View Post
I would say Cal v Stanford. The band being on the field and the laterals etc. make that play tough to beat.
Gotta disagree respectfully. No question The Play was amazing. But the Kick Six (OP, you have to get your terminology straight) is better. Here's why:

1) A bigger game. Much bigger. Cal and Stanford were mediocre teams when they played that game. Auburn and Alabama were programs that had sent a combined five teams to the championship game in five consecutive years. Alabama was #1 while Auburn was #4 in a game that would decide the SEC West. The teams were far better and the stakes were way, way higher.

2) The overall narrative. The endlessly reloading death machine that was Alabama versus the finesse running team of Auburn in quite possibly the bitterest sports rivalry around. The coach who was going for his third consecutive national championship versus a coach who had come from nowhere to cobble together a shattered 2012 team and turn it into 2013's most devastating offensive attack.

3) The Play was a play. Kick Six was the culmination of a helluva game. Auburn drew first blood. Alabama roared back with 21 unanswered points. Auburn clawed its way back to a tie. Alabama threw a 99-yard bomb for a touchdown. Auburn dodged three missed field goals and marched down the field, suckering Alabama with less than a minute to go to tie things up again. Just three hours of the most gripping football you'll ever watch, making that final return even more amazing.

4) The suspense surrounding the one remaining second. The Alabama coach insisting one second be put on the clock and his decision to have an untested kicker try one from an extreme distance. It had an air of desperation to it. Yet in the Iron Bowl, the impossible happens. You can just sense that very expectation in the replays of the game.

5) Auburn's wheels-within-wheels strategy on the last play of the game. Next time you hear some soccer fan talk about how boring football is, just point out the punch and counterpunch of strategy that took place on a single play. It should go into a time capsule so that people 1000 years from now can know what college football was all about. The timeout to ice the kicker. The blocking schemes. The substituting of Chris Davis at the last minute. I mean, the Wall Street Journal, of all publications, wrote an entire two-page article on the Auburn coaching decisions that put the right person in the right place.

Auburn-Alabama: Inside the Greatest Play of All - WSJ

6) The coup de grace. The play itself. As one writer puts it, "It was the single most unlikely play in football unfolding at the absolute perfect moment." The sheer pandemonium that ensued. The chaos it caused in the year-end bowl picture. The sheer number of articles that were written about it cements its epic nature. Here are two that stand out, saying it far better than I could have. An epic game that inspired epic sportswriting.

The 2013 Iron Bowl: Auburn should be dead, because we watched it die - SBNation.com

Shi: Auburn-Alabama and the new Big Bang | Stanford Daily

Hey. None of this takes away from the greatness of The Play. But for the sheer overwhelming nature of the moment, nothing beats the Kick Six. As one writer put it so eloquently: We are out of words. You should be dead, Auburn, because we saw you die. And here you are, breathing in the flesh, able to say this: you made the Alabama Crimson Tide kick the winning touchdown for you.
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Old 10-21-2014, 08:33 AM
 
10,543 posts, read 11,679,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Gotta disagree respectfully. No question The Play was amazing. But the Kick Six (OP, you have to get your terminology straight) is better. Here's why:

1) A bigger game. Much bigger. Cal and Stanford were mediocre teams when they played that game. Auburn and Alabama were programs that had sent a combined five teams to the championship game in five consecutive years. Alabama was #1 while Auburn was #4 in a game that would decide the SEC West. The teams were far better and the stakes were way, way higher.

2) The overall narrative. The endlessly reloading death machine that was Alabama versus the finesse running team of Auburn in quite possibly the bitterest sports rivalry around. The coach who was going for his third consecutive national championship versus a coach who had come from nowhere to cobble together a shattered 2012 team and turn it into 2013's most devastating offensive attack.

3) The Play was a play. Kick Six was the culmination of a helluva game. Auburn drew first blood. Alabama roared back with 21 unanswered points. Auburn clawed its way back to a tie. Alabama threw a 99-yard bomb for a touchdown. Auburn dodged three missed field goals and marched down the field, suckering Alabama with less than a minute to go to tie things up again. Just three hours of the most gripping football you'll ever watch, making that final return even more amazing.

4) The suspense surrounding the one remaining second. The Alabama coach insisting one second be put on the clock and his decision to have an untested kicker try one from an extreme distance. It had an air of desperation to it. Yet in the Iron Bowl, the impossible happens. You can just sense that very expectation in the replays of the game.

5) Auburn's wheels-within-wheels strategy on the last play of the game. Next time you hear some soccer fan talk about how boring football is, just point out the punch and counterpunch of strategy that took place on a single play. It should go into a time capsule so that people 1000 years from now can know what college football was all about. The timeout to ice the kicker. The blocking schemes. The substituting of Chris Davis at the last minute. I mean, the Wall Street Journal, of all publications, wrote an entire two-page article on the Auburn coaching decisions that put the right person in the right place.

Auburn-Alabama: Inside the Greatest Play of All - WSJ

6) The coup de grace. The play itself. As one writer puts it, "It was the single most unlikely play in football unfolding at the absolute perfect moment." The sheer pandemonium that ensued. The chaos it caused in the year-end bowl picture. The sheer number of articles that were written about it cements its epic nature. Here are two that stand out, saying it far better than I could have. An epic game that inspired epic sportswriting.

The 2013 Iron Bowl: Auburn should be dead, because we watched it die - SBNation.com

Shi: Auburn-Alabama and the new Big Bang | Stanford Daily

Hey. None of this takes away from the greatness of The Play. But for the sheer overwhelming nature of the moment, nothing beats the Kick Six. As one writer put it so eloquently: We are out of words. You should be dead, Auburn, because we saw you die. And here you are, breathing in the flesh, able to say this: you made the Alabama Crimson Tide kick the winning touchdown for you.
I don't disagree with what you say. It was a much bigger moment and the points you made are correct. In answering which is most famous, I think about how many would recognize it and how many non-football fans would know it. I think that because of the spectale with the band being on the field, it has been replayed far more outside of football circles than the Kick Six, even though the impact of the Kick Six was much greater on football. It still gets replayed on shows of great plays many years later.
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Old 10-22-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
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Auburn fans think the Kick Six is the greatest in history because it was the highlight of their season. It is something to hang on to, because the story of Alabama losing is greater then Auburn winning...anything because well, they lost and broke the SEC's stranglehold on the NC. The play won an ESPY and is replayed around here over and over again, and is brought up anytime Auburn is discussed no matter who they are playing or what is going on. My wife even had it as a ringtone for while before she finally came to her senses. Can you imagine? Obnoxious barely begins to cover it. I think it might have a chance to beat out "Sweet Home Alabama" and Ford F-150 commercials around here in terms of air time.

At any rate it will remain very high in "rankings" for some time, but it will eventually settle in to a bottom of the top ten moments because of the fact that other teams with more "cred" will win out in the fickle popularity battle of class favorites.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:31 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,194,930 times
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Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
Auburn fans think the Kick Six is the greatest in history because it was the highlight of their season. It is something to hang on to, because the story of Alabama losing is greater then Auburn winning...anything because well, they lost and broke the SEC's stranglehold on the NC. The play won an ESPY and is replayed around here over and over again, and is brought up anytime Auburn is discussed no matter who they are playing or what is going on. My wife even had it as a ringtone for while before she finally came to her senses. Can you imagine? Obnoxious barely begins to cover it. I think it might have a chance to beat out "Sweet Home Alabama" and Ford F-150 commercials around here in terms of air time.

At any rate it will remain very high in "rankings" for some time, but it will eventually settle in to a bottom of the top ten moments because of the fact that other teams with more "cred" will win out in the fickle popularity battle of class favorites.
Bitter, table for one. I mean, Tourian, how many freaking Daniel Moore prints of The Kick are still hanging up in the pine-panelled dens of fightin' updyke doublewides? Seriously, it's not as if beating Alabama is an epoch-shattering, once-in-a-generation event or anything for Auburn. Last time I checked, we have won the Iron Bowl considerably more times than Alabama since the Bear died. Let's see. 6-4 over the past ten years, 12-8 over the past twenty years, and 16-14 over the past thirty. Hell, before Saban came on the scene it had gotten routine. Even today, Saban only has a 6-6 record against Auburn.

It was a hellacious play in a hellacious game between two highly-ranked teams with national championship implications. That's why it gets the accolades. I mean, when I wore my Auburn sweatshirt in the Pacific Northwest last summer on vacation, I must have been approached by a dozen strangers, none of them Auburn partisans, telling me that it was the most amazing play they had ever seen. When the Stanford University newspaper devotes an entire column to the Kick Six immediately after The Cardinal put away Notre Dame, that should tell you something.

So I guess what I'm saying is that you're going to be seeing that play over and over for the rest of your life, and for good reason. Might as well be gracious and just concede this fact.

Last edited by cpg35223; 10-22-2014 at 09:50 PM..
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:48 PM
 
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Cal vs. Stanford. The play itself was uncanny with the squib kick, 4,5,6 whatever laterals and a friggen band.
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Bitter, table for one. I mean, Tourian, how many freaking Daniel Moore prints of The Kick are still hanging up in the pine-panelled dens of fightin' updyke doublewides? Seriously, it's not as if beating Alabama is an epoch-shattering, once-in-a-generation event or anything for Auburn. Last time I checked, we have won the Iron Bowl considerably more times than Alabama since the Bear died. Let's see. 6-4 over the past ten years, 12-8 over the past twenty years, and 16-14 over the past thirty. Hell, before Saban came on the scene it had gotten routine. Even today, Saban only has a 6-6 record against Auburn.

It was a hellacious play in a hellacious game between two highly-ranked teams with national championship implications. That's why it gets the accolades. I mean, when I wore my Auburn sweatshirt in the Pacific Northwest last summer on vacation, I must have been approached by a dozen strangers, none of them Auburn partisans, telling me that it was the most amazing play they had ever seen. When the Stanford University newspaper devotes an entire column to the Kick Six immediately after The Cardinal put away Notre Dame, that should tell you something.

So I guess what I'm saying is that you're going to be seeing that play over and over for the rest of your life, and for good reason. Might as well be gracious and just concede this fact.
I don't own any prints. I'm more of a end results type of guy. So, national titles mean more to me then Saban's record against any one team or single plays that have unimaginable results.
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Old 10-23-2014, 04:25 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,194,930 times
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Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
I don't own any prints. I'm more of a end results type of guy. So, national titles mean more to me then Saban's record against any one team or single plays that have unimaginable results.
That's nice. But that doesn't have anything to do with your original argument, or the point of this thread.
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Old 10-25-2014, 02:59 PM
 
30,879 posts, read 24,200,485 times
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i have to go with the "kick six" play. a most impressive and exciting play to watch, especially since at the moment everyone was thinking that alabama could do no worse than go into overtime, only to have that scenario rudely yanked away by the auburn special teams players.
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