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Old 04-24-2019, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,414 posts, read 26,459,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
Generally accepted by most of us who have followed college football since WWII.
Sorry. Saying that something is generally accepted, and then failing to provide evidence showing that it is in fact generally accepted, is not going to cut it. I could very well say that it is generally accepted that Donovan McNabb is the greatest QB of the past 25 years.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Fox Chapel
356 posts, read 133,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yale currently leads the NCAA in the number of claimed national football championships. They won in 1874, 1876, 1877, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1900, 1907, 1909 and 1927.

Obviously, they haven't won in nearly a century, and most Yalies and college football fans could hardly care about championships that were won before the mass production of automobiles and trans-Atlantic aviation. But where exactly is the cut off point for relevance? Is a championship title from 1975 something to boast about or is that too long ago?
Never. They only become irrelevant to people who would prefer to see their own favorite team become the talk of dynasties. This is called denial.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
8,437 posts, read 8,459,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Sorry. Saying that something is generally accepted, and then failing to provide evidence showing that it is in fact generally accepted, is not going to cut it. I could very well say that it is generally accepted that Donovan McNabb is the greatest QB of the past 25 years.
Sorry, but I and all my friends lived it. Donít need a whippersnapper ESPN sports writer to try say otherwise.
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:45 PM
 
1,912 posts, read 2,975,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Generally accepted by whom?



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern...rican_football

Some say the 1980s.



https://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/20...lege-football/

Point is that any cutoff for the "modern" game is arbitrary. Obviously, the "modern" era of football may be something completely different in the year 2137. But the purpose of this thread isn't to define the modern era of college football. I only used 1980 as a cutoff because the median age in the U.S. is about 38 years old.


I read a book a couple years ago (can't remember the name, if i remember between now and finishing this post i'll provide it) that looked at the boom in college football in the 1920s corresponding with the boom in commercial radio in the 1920s. I realize you didn't say this but the quote you provided said that college football was a novelty until the 1960s. Maybe in some parts of the country but in the midwest and certainly in the northeast college football was more popular than anything even remotely resembling pro football at that time. I'd say that puts college football slightly ahead of being a simple novelty.

Also, I'm not sure I'd choose to cite a website that is so closely attached at the hip to a major conference. College football may have come on strong in the south by the 1960s but other parts of the country had embraced in decades prior.

I'd go with either 1973 or 1978 (when A and AA were created for D1) as a jumping off point.
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Old 07-04-2019, 06:14 PM
 
1,605 posts, read 1,003,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Is a championship title from 1975 something to boast about or is that too long ago?
I'm gonna sound like Al Bundy but.. I believe a championship gives the players eternal bragging rights. Of course, every champion is eventually displaced.. but no one can take away the accomplishment of being the best for that season.. A national championship in college football is no joke.

Sports fans still celebrate the accomplishment of the '72 Dolphins.. I don't see anything wrong with alumni or former players boasting about a 70s national championship..
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Old 07-06-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,977 posts, read 6,284,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post

I'd go with either 1973 or 1978 (when A and AA were created for D1) as a jumping off point.
Those years meant nothing because those partitionings meant nothing at the time.

The reason that post WWII is the benchmark is because WWII caused a lot of upheaval in the game relative to the fact that most college players went to war. After they came back interest in the game jumped because America was ready to focus on sports again after the war. And a lot of star players came back to finish their NCAA careers.

However if you don't want to use WWII, there are several other solid benchmarks.

1936- The AP poll is inaugurated.

1957- teams began to use facemasks which changed the way the game was played.

1964- The re-institution of two platoon football.

1971- The year that most southern teams integrated their teams (or at least by 1973). And by this time there had been several star black players outside the south. During the 1970s there were seven black Heisman winners and numerous black all americans which had not been the case before that time. In fact black players won the Heisman from 1974-1983 before Doug Flutie won in 1984.

Anybody who doesn't think the 1970s was modern football is clueless. It was more running oriented for multiple reasons (blocking rules, no receiver gloves etc) but if anybody thinks guys like Tony Dorsett, Earl Campbell and Billy Sims wouldn't be ripping apart modern day defenses.............they are delusional.
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:40 PM
 
379 posts, read 175,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tractor Face View Post
Never. They only become irrelevant to people who would prefer to see their own favorite team become the talk of dynasties. This is called denial.
Well said, I agree. History happened and so did titles and championships of years gone by.

Teams go through swings of ups and downs. It's just a fact of sports and life. Not every team is very good every single year. Harvard and Penn have more wins than 13 of the 14 SEC programs and Yale has more wins than ANY SEC school, LOL.
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Old 07-12-2019, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
1,163 posts, read 576,157 times
Reputation: 2091
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yale currently leads the NCAA in the number of claimed national football championships. They won in 1874, 1876, 1877, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1900, 1907, 1909 and 1927.

Obviously, they haven't won in nearly a century, and most Yalies and college football fans could hardly care about championships that were won before the mass production of automobiles and trans-Atlantic aviation. But where exactly is the cut off point for relevance? Is a championship title from 1975 something to boast about or is that too long ago?
My view is that the titles won in the segregation era are not legitimate because the lack of minority athletes blocked a large student population that could have heightened the quality of the game. Barry Switzer noted that his championship football team of the early 1960s in the segregation era had probably only one or two players who would have made the OU football teams of the 1980s. The de-segregation made the game far more competitive (generally speaking).

So, titles in the segregation era don't really count that well.
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Old 07-13-2019, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,977 posts, read 6,284,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
Barry Switzer noted that his championship football team of the early 1960s in the segregation era had probably only one or two players who would have made the OU football teams of the 1980s.
Aside from the "segregation" aspect of your argument being legitimate there is another thing that is interesting about this statement.

Barry Switzer's "national championship" team in the '60s...........It would have to be Arkansas in 1964 when he was an assistant.

That team was awarded neither the AP or UPI national championship because it was awarded to Alabama before the bowl games. The Football Writer's of America awarded their national championship AFTER the bowl games and Arkansas was awarded theirs because Bama lost their bowl game. What's even more ridiculous is that Notre Dame went 9-1 that year in the regular season (Both Bama and Arkansas were undefeated) and won the MacArthur trophy as National Champion by the National Football foundation. So there were three national champions that year.

The awarding of national championships both before and after the bowl games in the same season really has made the national championship thing confusing.
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Old 07-19-2019, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
8,437 posts, read 8,459,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
My view is that the titles won in the segregation era are not legitimate because the lack of minority athletes blocked a large student population that could have heightened the quality of the game. Barry Switzer noted that his championship football team of the early 1960s in the segregation era had probably only one or two players who would have made the OU football teams of the 1980s. The de-segregation made the game far more competitive (generally speaking).

So, titles in the segregation era don't really count that well.
So, no MLB World Series championships prior to WWII are legitimate? Lol
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