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Old 07-29-2010, 11:41 AM
 
22 posts, read 137,699 times
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For a graduate student majored in Electrical Engineering, there are usually three kinds of degrees. Master of Science, Master of Science in Engineering and Ph.D.
I am wondering is there any difference between MS and MSE in job hunting? Will MS be better than MSE?
Thank you guys
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:45 PM
 
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I do not think there is a universal rule to distinguish between the two master degrees you described.

When I attended the University of Florida for EE in 2001-2002, two master degrees were offered: Master of Science and Master of Engineering. At that time, the only difference was this: If your undergrad degree was in engineering, then you could choose to receiver either the M.S. or the M.E. Otherwise (e.g., your undergrad was in physics), you could only receive the M.S. The course, thesis vs. non-thesis, exit exam, etc. requirements were exactly the same for both M.S. and M.E.

Since just a plain old M.S. degree is widely known, I (and all my classmates that I know of) chose the M.S.

I think I've seen other universities distinguish between the two flavors by thesis (M.S.) vs. non-thesis (M.E. or M.S.E.), with the non-thesis option replacing the thesis with more coursework or coursework plus a smaller project.

There shouldn't be a difference in job hunting just based on the name of those two degrees. As somebody who occasionally conducts interviews, I would not care. Of course, if for the program that you're considering, one degree implies means more effort than the other (e.g., one requires a thesis), and you use that to sell yourself, then it (the extra effort, not the name of the degree) will matter.
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:18 AM
 
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What is the Difference between MSE in Electrical Engineering & MS in Electrical Engineering? Explain the issue with Arizona State University regarding MSE & MSEE.
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Old 03-20-2014, 09:40 AM
EZX
 
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Default MSE vs MS

The grad degree requirements are essentially the same. The difference is in the student's undergrad degree... those students who are admitted with a transcript from an accredited undergraduate ABET EAC (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology - Engineering Accreditation Commission) program will be awarded a Master of Science in Engineering upon completion of the program requirements. All other students admitted to the program will pursue the Master of Science degree.

Last edited by EZX; 03-20-2014 at 09:43 AM.. Reason: html tags
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Old 03-20-2014, 10:11 AM
 
1,763 posts, read 3,598,262 times
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> I do not think there is a universal rule to distinguish between the two master degrees you described.

What merwin101 said. There is no central body that defines what a particular set of letters means.

>The grad degree requirements are essentially the same. The difference is in the student's undergrad degree... those students who are admitted with a transcript from an accredited undergraduate...

I have never heard of such a thing. It sounds very strange...but as I said since each institution makes its own rules maybe it applies somewhere in the world.

In practice- I think employers look at least briefly at courses taken and whether there is a project component. The exact letters probably don't matter, unless they are very familiar with the institution.
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Ohio
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In many cases, an MSE/ME are terminal, applied degrees. The MS degrees are more geared toward research/thesis and advancing toward a Phd. That is just a generality though. Definitely depends on the school.
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:32 PM
 
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The MS and MSE degrees both connote the individual has completed a graduate program in science.

If an individual completes a Masters Program in engineering, they may receive either of the 2 degrees. The difference is that the MSE can ONLY be conferred by universities that have programs in the specific engineering discipline (e.g., electrical or biomedical) that are accredited by the US National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE). The NSPE requires a minimal number of credits/hours of pertinent study in both didactic lectures as well as laboratory studies and individual projects in applied mathematics as well as courses specific to the discipline.

The MSE is considered a stronger degree than the MS for anyone that has majored in an engineering discipline. Unfortunately - and as evidenced by this forum - there is a lack of background knowledge regarding the quality of university programs in engineering. I was lucky enough to have an adviser that helped me to winnow out choices in my undergrad and graduate school choices.

Notably, the EU does not have the same criteria, and simply confer a MSc for any program that might be considered an engineering curriculum.

Also .. the same rules apply for the BS vs BSE degrees in engineering. I always recommend students to research the University accreditations for their engineering programs. Of note, a single university may have some older programs that ARE accredited (e.g., electrical engineering), whereas a newer program (e.g., biomedical engineering) may not be accredited. There are different criteria based on the specific discipline.


BSE & MSE in BME
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Old Today, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Near the Stone Barn on MDI
2,282 posts, read 1,475,447 times
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Often times the MS is a masters with a Thesis. The MS+some other letter is a masters with an internship. MY MSEd gave me a certificate that was required to work some where specific. The others got no certificate and did a thesis instead. Except for minor changes in the course work they were essentially the same degree, one in counseling psychology and the other in counselor education, which was essentially the same degree subject.
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Old Today, 08:36 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
10,890 posts, read 13,657,408 times
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Difference?
1 letter
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