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Old 07-29-2010, 11:41 AM
 
22 posts, read 92,156 times
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For a graduate student majored in Electrical Engineering, there are usually three kinds of degrees. Master of Science, Master of Science in Engineering and Ph.D.
I am wondering is there any difference between MS and MSE in job hunting? Will MS be better than MSE?
Thank you guys
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Old 07-29-2010, 05:45 PM
 
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I do not think there is a universal rule to distinguish between the two master degrees you described.

When I attended the University of Florida for EE in 2001-2002, two master degrees were offered: Master of Science and Master of Engineering. At that time, the only difference was this: If your undergrad degree was in engineering, then you could choose to receiver either the M.S. or the M.E. Otherwise (e.g., your undergrad was in physics), you could only receive the M.S. The course, thesis vs. non-thesis, exit exam, etc. requirements were exactly the same for both M.S. and M.E.

Since just a plain old M.S. degree is widely known, I (and all my classmates that I know of) chose the M.S.

I think I've seen other universities distinguish between the two flavors by thesis (M.S.) vs. non-thesis (M.E. or M.S.E.), with the non-thesis option replacing the thesis with more coursework or coursework plus a smaller project.

There shouldn't be a difference in job hunting just based on the name of those two degrees. As somebody who occasionally conducts interviews, I would not care. Of course, if for the program that you're considering, one degree implies means more effort than the other (e.g., one requires a thesis), and you use that to sell yourself, then it (the extra effort, not the name of the degree) will matter.
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:18 AM
 
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What is the Difference between MSE in Electrical Engineering & MS in Electrical Engineering? Explain the issue with Arizona State University regarding MSE & MSEE.
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Old 03-20-2014, 09:40 AM
EZX
 
1 posts, read 2,916 times
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Default MSE vs MS

The grad degree requirements are essentially the same. The difference is in the student's undergrad degree... those students who are admitted with a transcript from an accredited undergraduate ABET EAC (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology - Engineering Accreditation Commission) program will be awarded a Master of Science in Engineering upon completion of the program requirements. All other students admitted to the program will pursue the Master of Science degree.

Last edited by EZX; 03-20-2014 at 09:43 AM.. Reason: html tags
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Old 03-20-2014, 10:11 AM
 
1,619 posts, read 1,926,298 times
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> I do not think there is a universal rule to distinguish between the two master degrees you described.

What merwin101 said. There is no central body that defines what a particular set of letters means.

>The grad degree requirements are essentially the same. The difference is in the student's undergrad degree... those students who are admitted with a transcript from an accredited undergraduate...

I have never heard of such a thing. It sounds very strange...but as I said since each institution makes its own rules maybe it applies somewhere in the world.

In practice- I think employers look at least briefly at courses taken and whether there is a project component. The exact letters probably don't matter, unless they are very familiar with the institution.
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Ohio
71 posts, read 30,221 times
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In many cases, an MSE/ME are terminal, applied degrees. The MS degrees are more geared toward research/thesis and advancing toward a Phd. That is just a generality though. Definitely depends on the school.
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