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Old 01-19-2011, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Up North
3,381 posts, read 6,767,568 times
Reputation: 2995

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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The point is that you think people are picking on you when you bring it on yourself by what you post. Then you discount other's experiences and the ways they've accomplished what they have.
Some of your postings exude an air of entitlement, which is what others pick up on.
You seem to think that this period of economic uncertainty is the only one that anyone has ever seen when in reality your generation has been unnaturally blessed by not having to have faced this before, while some of us have gone through this type of economy 3 or four times beginning in the early 1970s (when it was almost impossible to get a job and people were questioning why they bothered to go to college).

I love this post! (I'm part of that spoiled generation and I agree with you )

I grew up pretty "spoiled". Shopping sprees at bloomingdales when I was in highschool, vacations all around the world, and I was told I had a college fund. Looking back on it, I was such a brat. I never wanted to go to college.

Well, when I was ready to go to college, I asked my mom "What happened to that money for college?"

To make a long story short it was gone and from that moment on I adapted and evolved into a self-sufficient, hard-working person. I think I would have turned into the most spoiled and annoying person if I did have that money. I have gained so much more from learning about life in a hands on way and I appreciate the fact that I even have the opportunity to go to college.

Props to my mom for spending all of my intended college fund at bloomies
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Old 01-20-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Texas
41,005 posts, read 45,257,300 times
Reputation: 63115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
High school is one thing, college is another; attending college isn't a "full-time" occupation--it is possible to do other things, as well. I knew some students who did nothing but attend class , and they had loads of free time; most others, though, worked part-time at something, i.e. restaurants, hospitals, department stores, etc, and they were much more responsible, in general.
Lol...then they must have really, really easy schedules and classes. No one could have done my curriculum and had another job.
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Old 01-20-2011, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
6,607 posts, read 14,048,879 times
Reputation: 5617
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmBarnett View Post
Also the work experience issue, very true. When I came to college alot of my friends could not find even entry level jobs because they have no prior work experience. When I came to college I had three job options because I had a few good years of work experiences, good managers for refrences(not just buddies and teachers), and my CNA. I imagine it is very difficult not have a job until your in your early twenty's then go look for a job that's anything much higher then entry level.
There are many ways to get that during college years. My college required internships for anumber of programs, and I feel genuinely fortunate that my parents were willing to subsidize my semester doing an unpaid internship in DC that let me put that I worked on Capitol Hill on my resume.
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Old 01-21-2011, 12:53 PM
 
6,997 posts, read 8,241,371 times
Reputation: 7693
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Lol...then they must have really, really easy schedules and classes. No one could have done my curriculum and had another job.
No, they were pre-med, engineering, and science majors who weren't spoiled by indulgent parents with vacations abroad with everything already paid for; they went downtown after classes and waited on tables, drove cabs, worked the gaveyard shift at hotels, did lab work in the local hospital, etc..

And they did it all without ever mentioning how wonderful they were at every conceivable opportunity...
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Old 01-23-2011, 12:56 PM
 
1,996 posts, read 2,459,812 times
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I study engineering at one of the top universities in northern Europe,
and while I have seen some classmates try to have a job on the side, most have either failed their studies or their jobs. The studies demands at least 55 hours per week of efficient studies, which usually ends up being 70+ hours.
I don't know anyone who's still working on the side of the studies who isn't either going to quit the job or drop out of school.
There are many times when I've needed to pull 16-20 hours on a regular schoolday, that was not pretest studying...

I don't know how college is in the US, but here even though few work only 10% manage to finish their studies within the engineeringprograms official time frame of 5 years. I have every intention of making it within those 10%, meaning I have no plans to get anything more than a summerjob.
I also intend to finish a bachelors degree in economics during this time.

But economics is different, this can be finished by just studying a few hours a day and you still get a degree. If I was just reading economics or was a law-student I could probably pull a job on the side, no problems.

What I hate about "supporting economicly" is when my mother put money into my account without asking, and then starts demanding things off me. If she's gonna want to control me she can rather keep the cash. That I'm poor doesn't mean I wanna get bought, not this way at least.

Last edited by SwedishViking; 01-23-2011 at 01:15 PM..
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Old 01-23-2011, 05:44 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 18,450,490 times
Reputation: 4875
Quote:
My parents give me a lot, but a car is where they draw the line for some reason.
Your statements give off an air of entitlement. What's wrong with your parents not buying you a car? What's wrong with you working for something for yourself?

It's nice that your parents are paying for college (so long as they can afford it) but expecting that they pay for your entire life, when you are an adult, is another matter.
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Old 01-23-2011, 05:59 PM
 
14,049 posts, read 11,552,781 times
Reputation: 17402
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
No, they were pre-med, engineering, and science majors who weren't spoiled by indulgent parents with vacations abroad with everything already paid for; they went downtown after classes and waited on tables, drove cabs, worked the gaveyard shift at hotels, did lab work in the local hospital, etc..

And they did it all without ever mentioning how wonderful they were at every conceivable opportunity...
Aside from the issue at the end, while it CAN be done by some is it the IDEAL situation?

Do you really think students in a top honors program, taking 18-21 credits a sem, can work 20 hours a week and not have it take a toll somewhere?

My daughter has worked very, very hard to get into the program she is in, as long as she continues to work that hard why would I penalize her now?

We can overgeneralize all night long, some kids are spoiled, some are not, working works out well for some and working while going to school surely takes away from academic performance for others.

But the end sentence makes it seem like its more an issue of sour grapes over some working class hero vs. spoiled rich kids.
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Old 01-23-2011, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
6,607 posts, read 14,048,879 times
Reputation: 5617
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Do you really think students in a top honors program, taking 18-21 credits a sem, can work 20 hours a week and not have it take a toll somewhere?
Academically, 20 hours diverted away from studies every week for another activity is no big deal. MIT's got one of the most comprehensive athletic programs of any school in the country, so you've got plenty of students at one of the best schools in the country diverting 15-20 hours a week toward sports without harming future employment or grad school prospects. It's common at a whole bunch of non-athletic scholarship schools to have their students get better grades in season than out of season because they're forced to have better time management skills.
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Old 01-23-2011, 07:57 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 18,450,490 times
Reputation: 4875
Quote:
Aside from the issue at the end, while it CAN be done by some is it the IDEAL situation?
Our greatest leaders almost all had to overcome adversity of some kind. Do you think that is a coincidence? It's not. Learning to overcome that adversity taught them valuable lessons, lessons that gave them the skills to become remarkable individuals and to lead. I can't help but worry about who will be our leaders of tomorrow, when the next generation don't even have to handle minor challenges like paying for food or rent, on their own.

So yes, I would say it IS the ideal situation that a college student manage their own finances and pay their own way in life--and to suffer the consequences of their mistakes. Parental help should be the backup plan.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:08 PM
 
14,049 posts, read 11,552,781 times
Reputation: 17402
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Academically, 20 hours diverted away from studies every week for another activity is no big deal. MIT's got one of the most comprehensive athletic programs of any school in the country, so you've got plenty of students at one of the best schools in the country diverting 15-20 hours a week toward sports without harming future employment or grad school prospects. It's common at a whole bunch of non-athletic scholarship schools to have their students get better grades in season than out of season because they're forced to have better time management skills.
MIT also forces students to live in the dorm freshman year and limit the number of credits they can take in a semester.

And if it comes down to it I would rather she take part in an athletic program than work at the gap. There are benefits in even rec sports, internships, etc that you cannot be replaced working a minimum wage job.
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