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Old 07-23-2007, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
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Question Why do people pursue Master's Degrees?

I have a bachelor's degree. Why would I need a Master's degree? What is the purpose of obtaining one for either business or non-profit?
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Old 07-23-2007, 02:31 PM
 
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A Masters Degree opens doors and gets you in positions that without one you would not be able to get. For instance, at my husbands ex company (we are retired now) you needed a MBA to be a Director or higher. So all of the high management employees had at least a MBA.

There are other examples too. Like you need at least a Masters to teach at a junior college. Stuff like that.
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Old 07-23-2007, 02:32 PM
 
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OK, If two people are applying for a job. One has a Masters. They seem to have equal skills and ability, which one would get the job? The one with the Masters, especially if he/she managed to get it while holding down a regular job. It implies that person

is one that tries to go that extra step.. That's not always true, but it is a good way of impressing people.

Another reason, in some fields such as Teaching or Nusing, it pays more and may help advancement to a supervisory position.

Now days, just about anyone can get a Bachlor's degree. It's no biggie.
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Old 07-23-2007, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
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For certain occupations it is the first true level of 'professionalism'. And with that comes the money and oppurtunities that we wouldnt otherwise have without the degree.

The same question would have been asked years ago about h.s. diplomas vs bachelors degrees but times are changing. And Im sure for some, it is just a way of impressing people. But for myself, its a hell of an expensive way to impress someone. I have more important reasons for continuuing my education.
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Old 07-23-2007, 04:13 PM
 
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I'm in complete agreement with all the above posts. Sadly, these days, college seems to no longer "suffice" in terms of profession. My son had decided that he would need an MBA even before he had actually applied to UNDERGRADUATE schools! --And he is probably right.

I got my master's because it would allow me to practice therapy and "officially" enter the field. (As well as hopefully be well compensated for it.)
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Old 07-23-2007, 04:48 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Padgett2 View Post
OK, If two people are applying for a job. One has a Masters. They seem to have equal skills and ability, which one would get the job? The one with the Masters, especially if he/she managed to get it while holding down a regular job. It implies that person

is one that tries to go that extra step.. That's not always true, but it is a good way of impressing people.

Another reason, in some fields such as Teaching or Nusing, it pays more and may help advancement to a supervisory position.

Now days, just about anyone can get a Bachlor's degree. It's no biggie.
I totally agree except sometimes employers want to cut corners and hire the less expensive employee. I've heard of that happening, but haven't seen it personally. And who would want to work someplace like that anyway?

But honestly Hoosier, today's bachelor's degrees are like high diplomas once were.

The other, and probably more valid reason to get an MA is for the pure love of learning. If you have to put a dollar figure on it, you might be doing it for the wrong reason.
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Old 07-23-2007, 07:09 PM
 
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Honestly, I think it depends on if it will take you to a higher level in your job or not.

DH needed one to work in his field and advance. They would not have even hired him without one.

I needed one just to have my job (school counseling), so it depends on your particular situation.

Dawn
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Old 07-25-2007, 01:44 AM
 
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What you learned in undergraduate years are not enough for your further career.

I have Highschool diploma,why do I need a bachelor degree?
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Old 07-25-2007, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Simple: a bachelors is today's equivalent to a high school degree in the 50s and 60s; a Masters is today's equivalent to a bachelor's degree back then. When bachelors degrees became ordinary, Masters degrees became the new way to stand out and say "I've jumped through more hoops, I've been through more personal and academic trials than the other guys, and I've demonstrated that I'm willing to go that extra mile and work a little harder." It's a gatekeeping process as much as anything else, and a masters degree opens more gates.

I'm currently pursuing a doctorate because my chosen profession requires it. It's largely a self-serving scam if you ask me, but I gotta play by their rules if I want to be part of the game.
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Old 07-25-2007, 04:33 AM
 
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You may not. What line of work do you want to be in? Certain jobs don't require college. DH's dad was an electrician. He didn't need college. It just depends on what you want to do.

I think it IS important to love what you do though. If you just work to get money, that wouldn't be enough for me. I need to enjoy what I do.

Dawn

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason1117 View Post
What you learned in undergraduate years are not enough for your further career.

I have Highschool diploma,why do I need a bachelor degree?
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