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Old 05-18-2011, 12:03 AM
 
4,148 posts, read 2,594,741 times
Reputation: 1842

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IUgrad08 View Post
History

It was expensive. The tuition was between $3,000 and $4,000/semester.


Entirely too much. Same with my wife, who got a degree in education. Cost of attendance was around $20,000/year, including living costs, books, etc. Let's just say we're six figures in debt...


No, but I never planned to go into anything related to history. I goofed off too much my first three years and finally settled on history because I planned to go to law school. I decided against it because I didn't want any more debt, though, so I went into IT instead because I had experience in it.


No, not even close.
Thank you for being so candid. I appreciate your honesty, even though it proved my point; I have respect for that.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:05 AM
 
4,148 posts, read 2,594,741 times
Reputation: 1842
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Statistics consist of multiple datapoints from a general sample that represents a whole. Your sample consists of one person, therefor your conclusion is meaningless.
Odd statement, even odder extrapolation. He's not giving you any statistics, he's actually giving you a real life first hand account of himself, which you chose to deem "meaningless." Sometimes we can't see the forest through the trees.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:11 AM
 
21,305 posts, read 16,947,808 times
Reputation: 9971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
Odd statement, even odder extrapolation. He's not giving you any statistics, he's actually giving you a real life first hand account of himself, which you chose to deem "meaningless." Sometimes we can't see the forest through the trees.
You have to look at the general population to get a real answer to your question.

I can counter his experience with mine and it would cancel it out. Before I went to college, I was making $68/hr (which you can roughly calculate to $136,000. Today, after obtaining a BS degree (and while working on my MBA), I currently make more than twice as much. My entire undergrad education cost me about $60,000 after a merit grants and an honors scholarship. So clearly my college education cost me less than it allowed me to make.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:32 AM
 
466 posts, read 412,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I didn't see bchris02 (or his specific experience) mentioned in the article. I don't see how the article explains that his one datapoint is valid to draw a conclusion from. Please explain.
Okay, I'll Explain: People all over the United States can't find jobs or are underemployed that have college degrees. The man's point was that college is a scam. He in venting his frustration with this horrible economy. The article that I posted, if you even read it, was to show how college has become something that doesn't help people out there like it did in the past, as there are thousands of people looking for good paying jobs, even after they have 1.) graduated with a degree or degrees and 2.) have done internships.....I think you're doing this for a cheap laugh, that or you're too stupid to see how graduating college isn't helping people right now.


Quote:
I can counter his experience with mine and it would cancel it out. Before I went to college, I was making $68/hr (which you can roughly calculate to $136,000. Today, after obtaining a BS degree (and while working on my MBA), I currently make more than twice as much. My entire undergrad education cost me about $60,000 after a merit grants and an honors scholarship. So clearly my college education cost me less than it allowed me to make.
Good for you..........Other people are getting negative returns.


Quote:
ow to be honest, David Cristello's stupidity was going to college when the economy was at the top and looking for work when it's at the bottom. He should have worked when there was plenty of jobs, and went to college now.
Wow......He didn't have a crystal ball to predict the future now did he? Your stupidity is to think the person in the article was a fool for going to college when he was out of high school when the economy was in better shape and then graduating college when the economy was in the crapper. How the f*** was he supposed to know when the economy was going to be bad???????????????.........

He had a goal. Go to college, graduate, and try to get a good paying job.....Like what anybody else has in mind when they go to college. They want to better themselves.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:44 AM
 
21,305 posts, read 16,947,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryhoyarbie View Post
Wow......He didn't have a crystal ball to predict the future now did he? Your stupidity is to think the person in the article was a fool for going to college when he was out of high school when the economy was in better shape and then graduating college when the economy was in the crapper. How the f*** was he supposed to know when the economy was going to be bad???????????????.........

He had a goal. Go to college, graduate, and try to get a good paying job.....Like what anybody else has in mind when they go to college. They want to better themselves.
Exactly. There's two problems here. One is the timing. Going to college right after highschool was a trend that became the norm after WWII. Baby boomers were sent off to college rather than to work because the economy was such that their parents had jobs until they were 60 and then guaranteed a pension. And their children were likely to get jobs in the same company after graduating.

Now we've learned why going to college right after highschool is not always the right choice. There's a reason why that mindset didn't work from 18xx to 194x.

The other part is that somehow it's taught to everyone that the easy brute force low risk method is the best method. I'm talking about going to college, getting an entry level job, and working your way up. What they forget is that low risk means low rewards. Very few people focus on high reward career paths.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:47 AM
 
21,305 posts, read 16,947,808 times
Reputation: 9971
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryhoyarbie View Post
Okay, I'll Explain: People all over the United States can't find jobs or are underemployed that have college degrees. The man's point was that college is a scam. He in venting his frustration with this horrible economy. The article that I posted, if you even read it, was to show how college has become something that doesn't help people out there like it did in the past, as there are thousands of people looking for good paying jobs, even after they have 1.) graduated with a degree or degrees and 2.) have done internships.....I think you're doing this for a cheap laugh, that or you're too stupid to see how graduating college isn't helping people right now.
One of my businesses is a recruiting and staffing firm. I frequently review credentials and even visit colleges to recruit individuals and give speeches. I have an idea of how it works.

A college alumni network is one of the most valuable assets.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:50 AM
 
466 posts, read 412,946 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Exactly. There's two problems here. One is the timing. Going to college right after highschool was a trend that became the norm after WWII. Baby boomers were sent off to college rather than to work because the economy was such that their parents had jobs until they were 60 and then guaranteed a pension. And their children were likely to get jobs in the same company after graduating.

Now we've learned why going to college right after highschool is not always the right choice. There's a reason why that mindset didn't work from 18xx to 194x.

The other part is that somehow it's taught to everyone that the easy brute force low risk method is the best method. I'm talking about going to college, getting an entry level job, and working your way up. What they forget is that low risk means low rewards. Very few people focus on high reward career paths.
So who cares if he went to college right after high school? Your previous post had you placing blame on him for going to college when the economy was in better shape and chastising him for graduating when the economy was in poor shape.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:51 AM
 
21,305 posts, read 16,947,808 times
Reputation: 9971
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryhoyarbie View Post
So who cares if he went to college right after high school? Your previous post had you placing blame on him for going to college when the economy was in better shape and chastising him for graduating when the economy was in poor shape.
Pre WWII, this would have been considered a stupid move. People were blinded by the booming economy and failed to realize that it is still a stupid move. Believe it or not, timing matters. Going to college when the economy is booming is a risky decision. This is typically taught in an economics class in college. There's a professor named Brockner at Columbia business school who goes into this in detail.
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Old 05-18-2011, 01:01 AM
 
466 posts, read 412,946 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Pre WWII, this would have been considered a stupid move. People were blinded by the booming economy and failed to realize that it is still a stupid move. Believe it or not, timing matters. Going to college when the economy is booming is a risky decision. This is typically taught in an economics class in college. There's a professor named Brockner at Columbia business school who goes into this in detail.
He was 18 when he graduated high school 5 years ago. What the f*** was he supposed to do, work as a waiter for three years and then go to college? He wanted to go to college to better himself.

The whole entire point of this topic was to see if college is a scam or not....You don't believe it's a scam, yet place blame for people going to college when the economy was good. At 18 or 20 years of age what are people supposed to do? If they have a goal in mind and a job that requires a college degree, then they go for it, regardless if the economy is good or not. You going to try to convince someone who wants to become a nurse to work for a few years at the Gap after graduating high school and then go to school when the economy was in better shape??????................
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Old 05-18-2011, 01:05 AM
 
21,305 posts, read 16,947,808 times
Reputation: 9971
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryhoyarbie View Post
He was 18 when he graduated high school 5 years ago. What the f*** was he supposed to do, work as a waiter for three years and then go to college? He wanted to go to college to better himself.

The whole entire point of this topic was to see if college is a scam or not....You don't believe it's a scam, yet place blame for people going to college when the economy was good. At 18 or 20 years of age what are people supposed to do? If they have a goal in mind and a job that requires a college degree, then they go for it, regardless if the economy is good or not. You going to try to convince someone who wants to become a nurse to work for a few years at the Gap after graduating high school and then go to school when the economy was in better shape??????................
Let's get back on topic since this thread is about the value of college. College is a tool. You have to use the tool wisely. You cannot enter college blindly and expect to get a lot out of it.
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