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Old 05-19-2011, 10:43 AM
 
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I am currently going to school for non-quantitative economics. its a theory based major on econ, and doesn't have the math requirements of the Bachelors of Science.

I think a lack of math knowledge will hurt me though down the line with the major, and I really want the BS anyways, since it is true economics.

I placed into Intermediate Algebra and actually took the initiative and enrolled in the course this summer.

After Intermediate Algebra I would then have to take College Algebra 1, which I would do in the fall, College Algebra 2 in the spring, leading into Calculus 1 in the fall.

Just trying to decide if I can realistically do this.

Would like math people to comment.

Thanks.
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Old 05-19-2011, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Away
208 posts, read 725,664 times
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Default People are different

I was someone who never performed well in math, I always thought it was because math was too hard, in actuality, I never really gave math my all. I didn't take calculus, but in college I did have to take Algebra, Geometry and some classes on statistics. I found that these classes were very easy when I just sat down and read and learned slowly.

Why don't you buy a calculus book from amazon.com, I just searched and they have a Calculus for Dummies book; the dummies series has a way of explaining things in simpler forms.

You will never know if you can do it until you try.
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:39 PM
 
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Hard to tell - is sounds like you have the right path to get there, but a lot of it is up to your aptitude and desire.

One of my buddies freshman year worked his butt off, but couldn't get the math needed for his engineering program and dropped.

I graduated with an econ and finance major and the math you use is different than that which is used in some of the science/engineering majors
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:48 PM
 
3,513 posts, read 3,110,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finger Laker View Post
Hard to tell - is sounds like you have the right path to get there, but a lot of it is up to your aptitude and desire.

One of my buddies freshman year worked his butt off, but couldn't get the math needed for his engineering program and dropped.

I graduated with an econ and finance major and the math you use is different than that which is used in some of the science/engineering majors
from what i read you need a solid base in algebra.

im going to go for it i think.

i think if i spend time at it I will get it.
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:58 PM
 
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I'd say that is right
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Old 05-20-2011, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,701,155 times
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For me, Calculus was a new start in math, although I came from poor high schools, and was not good at algebra, although I had a good intuitive grasp of geometry, when I hit college, my first attempt at Differential Calculus I sort of lost it and withdrew passing (barely) fairly early in that year. Next time I took a swing at it, I made it a point to stay "up" with the first calculus class when I finished it the 2nd time, I had a 97% average on my tests going into the final.

I had the same instructor, I think he got a kick out of me coming back like Rocky.

You know that Quaker power bar commercial where the little boy is talking, and he says something like "it was crunch time, so I had to bring it, and I struck like a cobra..." That was what it felt like.

So. It's crunch time. Bring it. Strike like a cobra...
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Old 05-21-2011, 06:32 PM
 
286 posts, read 591,759 times
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A bs in economics isn't real economics. Real economics takes place at the PhD level and uses advanced mathematics as it's foundation. And like any other doctorate degree in the social sciences, 90% of it is useless, has no bearing to the real world, and qualifies you for a govt job and little else.

If you're going to tack on the extra time of taking calculus, then you should have a major that will financially reward you for it. Otherwise, you're paying to keep adjunct profs employed.

Econ degrees are a dime-a-dozen. An Econ minor though is great - along with stats, comp sci, math, accounting, etc. All good minors. But an econ major is a poor utilization of money and 4+ years of your life.

If you doubt me, go to a job site and look for jobs requiring Econ degrees.
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Old 05-21-2011, 06:35 PM
 
3,513 posts, read 3,110,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcredux View Post
A bs in economics isn't real economics. Real economics takes place at the PhD level and uses advanced mathematics as it's foundation. And like any other doctorate degree in the social sciences, 90% of it is useless, has no bearing to the real world, and qualifies you for a govt job and little else.

If you're going to tack on the extra time of taking calculus, then you should have a major that will financially reward you for it. Otherwise, you're paying to keep adjunct profs employed.

Econ degrees are a dime-a-dozen. An Econ minor though is great - along with stats, comp sci, math, accounting, etc. All good minors. But an econ major is a poor utilization of money and 4+ years of your life.

If you doubt me, go to a job site and look for jobs requiring Econ degrees.
econ is actually one of the most lucrative majors.

Best Undergrad College Degrees By Salary
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Old 05-21-2011, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Colorado Plateau
1,133 posts, read 3,176,021 times
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I decided to go to college when I was in my 30s. I knew I wanted to go into a hard science. I also knew my math skills were completely absent. I had never taken an algebra class in HS. I had no idea what x meant.

My first college class was basic arithmetic/pre-algebra. I got an A. Over the next several semesters I took Beginning Algebra, Intermediate Algebra and College Algebra (got A's). Then I got a B in Trig. Big letdown, LOL. Took Pre-Calc (A, one of my best math classes!) then Calc I (A) and Calc II (B). Then I decided that I'd had enough fun.

My major was geology.
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Old 05-21-2011, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
3,223 posts, read 8,243,788 times
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I had algebra II in highschool and I had some calculus course in highschool as a freshman which revolved around the TI83 or whatever calculator, then in a University took Pre-calculus (no calculator, just 1 or 2 page equations on paper). It was HARD. There is nothing "pre" about it. Letme tell u need a very solid understanding of algebra before u should go into any calculus. And the teacher isn't going to teach u it in class, she will jot a bunch of nonstop b.s. and u will be lucky to write it down as notes but when u get home u have to actually learn it yourself which will take u as long as it takes to do homework for the rest of your 4 classes. I pretty much failed it and dropped out largely because of that. Those AP classes nerdy students take in highschool prepare u (better yet teach u because u either knew it or didnt in my college precalc class) for entry-level college calculus. I had nothing of the sort and sunk within the first couple weeks. BTW half the class failed or left and ratemyprofessor.com gives that teacher good ratings. Probably because AP students go on that site mostly.

Last edited by dhanu86; 05-21-2011 at 08:32 PM..
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