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Old 06-04-2011, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
25,062 posts, read 31,026,757 times
Reputation: 15309

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AN DIEGO (CBS 8) - A former local law student is suing her alma mater for $50 million, after she couldn't find a job.

The student, San Diegan Anna Alaburda, graduated with honors from the Thomas Jefferson School of Law and passed the bar on her first try. She claims she has been unable to find full-time work as an attorney for the past three years.

San Diego law school grad sues her alma mater for $50 million - San Diego, California Talk Radio Station - 760 KFMB AM - 760kfmb
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:00 AM
 
26 posts, read 24,760 times
Reputation: 33
I almost went to law school a few years ago. I am glad I didn't. People need to do some serious research before deciding to go to law school. The popular consensus is that you should only go to a top 15 school. I tend to agree with this but will also add that if you can not get admitted into a top 15, then you should go to a school that is in the region you would like to practice in. All of that is moot though, if you can get a full ride anywhere. People need to balance debt, school reputation, and potential employment opportunities before committing to law school.
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Old 06-06-2011, 08:56 AM
 
4,916 posts, read 4,972,645 times
Reputation: 7014
If she did her homework, she should have known that law is a flooded field with a lot more attys than jobs, so what did she expect? Unless you graduate in the top of the class at a T1 school, forget about starting out in the big bucks--even you even start out at all. Buyer beware....
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:03 AM
 
4,916 posts, read 4,972,645 times
Reputation: 7014
Just looked the place up....it's an expensive T4 school.
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:48 AM
 
26 posts, read 24,760 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
Just looked the place up....it's an expensive T4 school.
I completely agree. As I mentioned in my initial post, it is a huge investment, with the probability of a small return. People need to do some SERIOUS research. Buyer Beware indeed....
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Old 06-06-2011, 10:37 AM
 
2,270 posts, read 1,500,783 times
Reputation: 3148
Buyer beware, but law schools are clearly manipulating the employmet data and salaries for their graduates. It highly unethical the way in which many law schools represent themselves, especially when you are asking people to fork over almost $200k in loans which could cripple them for life. Why don't law schools show clean employment stats? What are they afraid of? Don't misrepresent your product from the start and people won't be upset.
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Old 06-06-2011, 11:09 AM
 
26 posts, read 24,760 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
Buyer beware, but law schools are clearly manipulating the employmet data and salaries for their graduates. It highly unethical the way in which many law schools represent themselves, especially when you are asking people to fork over almost $200k in loans which could cripple them for life. Why don't law schools show clean employment stats? What are they afraid of? Don't misrepresent your product from the start and people won't be upset.

Very true. I came very close to going to law school a couple of years ago and I was fortunate enough to have the idea to do some in-depth research on the matter first. There are a few things people should consider. First, is employment opportunities. People need to keep in mind that law school isn't the holy grail it once was proposed to be. Too many lawyers, not enough jobs. Second, beware of your debt. It is quite common to rack up about $200,000 worth of debt while in law school.

Basically it comes down to this. If you can go to a top 15 school, you"ll have a higher probability of being ok. However, it is still a risky investment. My advice to someone that really wants to be a lawyer, is to attend law school only if you get into a top 15 school, or if you get a full ride into a strong-regional school.
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Old 06-06-2011, 11:12 AM
 
26 posts, read 24,760 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
Buyer beware, but law schools are clearly manipulating the employmet data and salaries for their graduates. It highly unethical the way in which many law schools represent themselves, especially when you are asking people to fork over almost $200k in loans which could cripple them for life. Why don't law schools show clean employment stats? What are they afraid of? Don't misrepresent your product from the start and people won't be upset.

Of course they manipulate employment data. One of the law schools I was admitted into claimed that 96% of their graduates from the previous graduating class was employed at least 9 months out of graduation. Of course, they didnt mention what kind of employment or what salary these graduates were making. Working at Target for minimum wage, counts towards the 96% employed.
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Old 06-06-2011, 12:40 PM
 
2,270 posts, read 1,500,783 times
Reputation: 3148
Exactly, working at Walmart or being underemployed as a clerk making $40k per year with $200k in loans still means you are "employed" according to most schools. Do many people not see how unethical that is? It is borderline fraud. Now I'm not sure how accrediting works, but I highly suspect that the ABA makes a lot of money off of fees when they accredit new schools to grant JDs. Law schools are also highly profitable, so schools make a killing off of law school tuition. No one high up cares about the students or the fact that their, prfit driven motives behind accrediation are completely oversaturating the labor market for lawyers. They are all busy making obscene amounts of money at the expense of their graduates' futures. It is a business, it's simple as that. Maybe it is time we start taxing these so called not for profit learning institutions.
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Old 06-06-2011, 01:19 PM
 
26 posts, read 24,760 times
Reputation: 33
Absolutely. Law schools have turned into degree mills
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