U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-11-2011, 03:37 PM
LDH LDH started this thread
 
168 posts, read 334,410 times
Reputation: 102
Default Anyone Go Back to College after 50?

I'm quickly approaching the age of 50 and now feel like I'm ready to go to college and get a degree. I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run. I hope to retire in 10-12 years and am not sure it will be worth it cost-wise. My employer won't pay for it because I want to get a degree in an area out of my field.

Has anyone here gone back to school and gotten their degree after 50?

What do you feel the pros and cons were in doing so?

Is it possible to get scholarships when you are older or they primarily for the younger students?

Anything else you can interject, please do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-11-2011, 06:00 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,553 posts, read 9,092,449 times
Reputation: 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I'm quickly approaching the age of 50 and now feel like I'm ready to go to college and get a degree. I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run. I hope to retire in 10-12 years and am not sure it will be worth it cost-wise. My employer won't pay for it because I want to get a degree in an area out of my field.

Has anyone here gone back to school and gotten their degree after 50?

What do you feel the pros and cons were in doing so?

Is it possible to get scholarships when you are older or they primarily for the younger students?

Anything else you can interject, please do so.
DO IT!!!! If you haven't achieved a bachelor's, you can apply for the Federal Pell Grant. If you're entering a field that is non-traditional for your gender or you are a member of an under-represented group, e.g., an American Indian male in nursing, there might be scholarships. Take a class and see how it goes. You will not be the ONLY non-traditional (in this sense, a recent HS graduate, 1st time college) student in the class. GOOD LUCK!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2011, 06:18 PM
 
Location: The Triad (nc)
16,623 posts, read 20,360,822 times
Reputation: 13600
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run.
If fewer people had an expectation that going to college was for purposes that will "benefit" them in ways measured beyond the intrinsic value of an education in itself....

:sigh:
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2011, 07:46 PM
 
2,594 posts, read 2,152,963 times
Reputation: 3805
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I'm quickly approaching the age of 50 and now feel like I'm ready to go to college and get a degree. I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run. I hope to retire in 10-12 years and am not sure it will be worth it cost-wise. My employer won't pay for it because I want to get a degree in an area out of my field.

Has anyone here gone back to school and gotten their degree after 50?

What do you feel the pros and cons were in doing so?

Is it possible to get scholarships when you are older or they primarily for the younger students?

Anything else you can interject, please do so.
Make sure it is going to be worth it cost-wise before you do it. At 50, you can't afford to waste that kind of money. I do not agree that there are intrinsic benefits to a college education - at least not any worth the cost of getting one. It's not really clear why you want to get the degree - is just a matter of personal pride? In that case, do it only if you absolutely can't live with yourself otherwise. If you are planning a post-retirement career change of some sort, then it might be worth it if you are sure the degree will help you more than your years of experience. If you post some more specific information, like the type of degree you want and why, you can get more specific answers, I think.

If your question was about being a nontraditional student or being able to handle the work, you will probably find you are better equipped for the academics than most of the younger students.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2011, 09:22 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
13,407 posts, read 15,192,913 times
Reputation: 8838
My sister did it at 43, got a degree in nutrition and has been happily working at a major hospital now for 10 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2011, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
8,968 posts, read 5,532,817 times
Reputation: 4537
Sure, that is the great thing about our country. One can always improve one's self. However, there are a couple pretty important reasons not to: 1) opportunity cost (if you spend a lot of time in classes at your age,cutting work to part-time, it will bea major hit in lost wages, saving for retirement,etc., 2) real cost, clearly you do not want to be running up student loans when you should be saving. If you have a punk job or are underemployed at the moment, obviously, these will be less limiting.

But frankly, if I were you, I think I would view it more as a flexible thing. Take some classes at the community college or state college nearby, as appropriate, but not commit to the whole degree thing. And education is much more than a diploma, but rather a view towards learning and thinking. You can move towards these with some college, but the sheepskin will not add that much more at your age. Do you really want to sit through freshman chemistry with 300 19 year olds? I suspect you have already learned a great deal, and the interactions between your experience and college learning should be very satisfying with some targeted coursework aimed at building your knowledge and skills in selected areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,474 posts, read 9,644,432 times
Reputation: 5128
I think if tou are going for financial reasons, it may not be worth the investment. For personal growth and curiousity--it is priceless.

Like others have said, look at classes or programs at the community college. Learn some great things that will help you in retirement! That is what we are doing (both over 50) and getting ready to "retire" early in 2 years so we can do what we want to, and not what we have to just for a check.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: SRQ
4,169 posts, read 7,926,831 times
Reputation: 1481
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I'm quickly approaching the age of 50 and now feel like I'm ready to go to college and get a degree. I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run. I hope to retire in 10-12 years and am not sure it will be worth it cost-wise. My employer won't pay for it because I want to get a degree in an area out of my field.

Has anyone here gone back to school and gotten their degree after 50?

What do you feel the pros and cons were in doing so?

Is it possible to get scholarships when you are older or they primarily for the younger students?

Anything else you can interject, please do so.
I'm considering going back for a second degree next year (49). It can't be any worse than feeling you are at a dead end in your current job & education is never a bad thing. Follow your heart, remember City Data is a small representation of opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2011, 10:22 AM
 
11,151 posts, read 9,141,302 times
Reputation: 18524
I'm going to echo what others have said -- if you're going after a degree for career purposes, it simply may not be a financially sound decision (unless you're planning to work well into your 70's). However, earning a degree will do wonders for you in terms of self-enrichment and a feeling of accomplishment.

If your goal is to get a degree "just because" then there's no reason you can't do that on a part-time basis by taking one or two classes at a time while maintaining your current job.


ETA: I earned my B.A. at the age of 33 and my M.S. at 50, so I know a bit about being a non-traditional student .....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW / CO / SA TX / Thailand
10,669 posts, read 17,287,950 times
Reputation: 7544
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH View Post
I'm quickly approaching the age of 50 and now feel like I'm ready to go to college and get a degree. I'm just not sure it will benefit me in the long run. I hope to retire in 10-12 years and am not sure it will be worth it cost-wise. My employer won't pay for it because I want to get a degree in an area out of my field.

Has anyone here gone back to school and gotten their degree after 50?

What do you feel the pros and cons were in doing so?

Is it possible to get scholarships when you are older or they primarily for the younger students?

Anything else you can interject, please do so.
I did, and my sis as well (she did a VERY tough technical Masters @ age 58)

If it is out of your field, you may never see monetary repayment. (It is really tough to jump to a new 'employed' career after age 50 and make it pencil out).

If it is something that will help you if self employed or to buy a business or to serve as a volunteer in your 2nd half of life, there is value.

WARNING: I was disappointed in the attitude / learning's of current educators and students.... it is a whole different learning environment now days, and MANY kids are being paid 100% by parents, thus not too engaged as co-students. (i.e. you may end up doing all the work yourself on joint projects). I did find it enriching and VERY ez (too EZ) to get good grades. (magna... with very little effort on my part). I will comfortably say the grading levels / expectations were way too light in my school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:17 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top