U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-29-2011, 07:01 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,354,094 times
Reputation: 10471

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
You do realize, don't you, that private schools have the same tuition whether you are in-state or out of state? Athletes that go to D-3 schools cannot get scholarships for sports but if they want your student, they will find the money and call it an alumni scholarship or something similar. Also, it's not that unusual for a smaller school to have one sport that is played at a higher division level. I don't know how often that's the case for women's golf.

My kids were not athletes so I did not go through the college search with those parameters but I do have close friends whose kids were athletes. One friend had very smart twin boys, both interested in engineering and both who were excellent soccer players. Both ended up at different private colleges where they were awarded large merit scholarships. One ended up playing varsity soccer all four years. The other one played one semester, decided he really didn't like the coach and (along with several teammates) dropped the team and played the sport at a club level. Both boys graduated in May and got jobs. The last two words are important.

I know a few athletes that focused their college search so much on finding the right coach, playing conditions and the whole effort of presenting themselves as student-athletes that they put the academic research on the back burner, thinking that as long as the college had their major, that part would work itself out. However, if the sport itself no longer appeals, the coach moves out/gets fired, there's an injury, etc then the student is left kind of adrift.

My point, and I don't mean to be stating the obvious, is just a reminder to look at the colleges themselves and make sure your kids can picture themselves there, with or without their sport.
That is very true. I saw that frequently when I was in college. We have told our daughter that in the end, her final decision is going to come down to who gives her the best package. That might be all academic money from a DIII school. She is just fine with that. She is looking at her golf skills as a way to pay for college, not to BE college for her.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-29-2011, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
41,314 posts, read 38,470,229 times
Reputation: 7104
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
You do realize, don't you, that private schools have the same tuition whether you are in-state or out of state? Athletes that go to D-3 schools cannot get scholarships for sports but if they want your student, they will find the money and call it an alumni scholarship or something similar. Also, it's not that unusual for a smaller school to have one sport that is played at a higher division level. I don't know how often that's the case for women's golf.

Yeah, I know that. Same thing applies though - not all that gung ho on paying $40K a year for a private college either...unless there would be either merit or athletic scholarships.

I just found that out about DIII - if they want you, they will find a way to reduce the tuition.


My kids were not athletes so I did not go through the college search with those parameters but I do have close friends whose kids were athletes. One friend had very smart twin boys, both interested in engineering and both who were excellent soccer players. Both ended up at different private colleges where they were awarded large merit scholarships. One ended up playing varsity soccer all four years. The other one played one semester, decided he really didn't like the coach and (along with several teammates) dropped the team and played the sport at a club level. Both boys graduated in May and got jobs. The last two words are important.

I know a few athletes that focused their college search so much on finding the right coach, playing conditions and the whole effort of presenting themselves as student-athletes that they put the academic research on the back burner, thinking that as long as the college had their major, that part would work itself out. However, if the sport itself no longer appeals, the coach moves out/gets fired, there's an injury, etc then the student is left kind of adrift.

My point, and I don't mean to be stating the obvious, is just a reminder to look at the colleges themselves and make sure your kids can picture themselves there, with or without their sport.
The first priority will be the school of course. A gold scholarship/playing for a college team would be icing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
That is very true. I saw that frequently when I was in college. We have told our daughter that in the end, her final decision is going to come down to who gives her the best package. That might be all academic money from a DIII school. She is just fine with that. She is looking at her golf skills as a way to pay for college, not to BE college for her.
Same here...although it's me and dad that are looking for ways.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 10:34 AM
 
Location: McKeesport, PA
2,329 posts, read 6,847,513 times
Reputation: 1536
When I embarked on my college journey, my parents had little (to no) input because 1) they never went to college themselves and 2) it's not like they were paying for it. So for me, I had the following considerations:

#1 - Majors & programs offered
#2 - Financial aid & costs
#3 - Reputation

These were really the only 3 points on my mind at the time. At first I wanted to work in the aviation field, so a college had to offer that. Later, I just needed a place where I could design my own major. The second point was important on the surface...but in the end, I just ended up paying whatever it took to get my degree. And finally I was not too keen when I was younger to go to a local, more regionally-known school. I wanted a school who had a 'name brand' nation-wide (or at least across several states). Today...that's not so much of an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Location - part of the country - rural, urban, semi-rural
I sort-of thought about this; but only because I couldn't imagine living in a rural location...even for school. My sister did it, and she hated it to the core. I think I would have been the same (my university was "small town"; but it was less than an hour's drive away from a decent-sized city {Pittsburgh})
Quote:
Size of student body - 1,000, 40,000 or somewhere in between
Not really an issue. My school had about 20K students...but to me it seems smaller because most of my classes and my work-study was at the secondary campus. But it was cool to go to a football game with 20K+ of your 'classmates'
Quote:
Cost -
Financial aid
Merit aid
Major
(See above)
Quote:
Campus atmosphere - preppy, laid back, all-work, etc.
I did worry about this...in that I was an ethnic minority at a largely White school in a very homogenous state (WV). However I found a core group a friends and got involved heavily with some on campus groups (including a religious group), so it wasn't so bad. But yeah, if I didn't have that, it would have sucked.
Quote:
Transportation - how close to public transportation
A non-issue...since I had my own car. But from what I heard, the public transportation in town wasn't as bad as I would have thought.
Quote:
Co-op's required?
Graduation Rate
Not an issue.
Quote:
Avg. GPA of accepted students
% of students accepted
I was a good student, so I seriously never even considered these things. But today, things are more competitive (as compared to the 1990s). Probably would be a good point to think about now.
Quote:
% of in-state students
I didn't consider this personally...but I probably should have. The campus climate was very different than the rest of the state (WV) mainly due to the fact that a large percentage (like 45%) of the students were from out-of-state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2011, 08:46 AM
 
14 posts, read 73,500 times
Reputation: 21
Golfgal:

W&M is a great school; it has very good academics and some great professors but it can be a little competitive.
The campus is amazing, but I hate the city.
(I've been going there for a year.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2011, 04:18 PM
 
54 posts, read 262,240 times
Reputation: 68
ARE THESE CONSIDERED GOOD SCHOOLS?

WHICH ARE THE BEST ON THIS LIST AND THE WORST?

WHAT IS THE REPUTATION OF THESE SCHOOLS?

- MARIST COLLEGE in Poughkeepsie, NY
- MOLLOY COLLEGE in Rockville Centre, NY
- ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE in Patchogue and Bklyn (not to be mistaken for SJ University)
- SUNY OLD WESTBURY

HELP!!! Anyone who responds will get a reputation point
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2011, 10:32 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,354,094 times
Reputation: 10471
Does anyone one know anything about the University of Northern Iowa?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2011, 12:56 PM
 
8,935 posts, read 15,847,848 times
Reputation: 6639
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepTheIslanders50 View Post
ARE THESE CONSIDERED GOOD SCHOOLS?

WHICH ARE THE BEST ON THIS LIST AND THE WORST?

WHAT IS THE REPUTATION OF THESE SCHOOLS?

- MARIST COLLEGE in Poughkeepsie, NY
- MOLLOY COLLEGE in Rockville Centre, NY
- ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE in Patchogue and Bklyn (not to be mistaken for SJ University)
- SUNY OLD WESTBURY

HELP!!! Anyone who responds will get a reputation point

I only know 1 of the 4 and that is Marist .... very good liberal arts college, very nice campus on the hudson, for a small lib arts school it's name is fairly well known in the rest of NYS and other parts of the NE

Some pretty good facilities and decent technology due to their IBM partnership - I knew one girl from HS who went there and she loved it (at least for the 1st 2 years - haven't spoken with her since)

The benefits and drawbacks are one in the same - it's a liberal arts school ... they have a reputation for being good with aid
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2011, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,185 posts, read 21,737,838 times
Reputation: 6116
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepTheIslanders50 View Post
ARE THESE CONSIDERED GOOD SCHOOLS?

WHICH ARE THE BEST ON THIS LIST AND THE WORST?

WHAT IS THE REPUTATION OF THESE SCHOOLS?

- MARIST COLLEGE in Poughkeepsie, NY
- MOLLOY COLLEGE in Rockville Centre, NY
- ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE in Patchogue and Bklyn (not to be mistaken for SJ University)
- SUNY OLD WESTBURY

HELP!!! Anyone who responds will get a reputation point
A friend of mine went to Marist, and loved it. Not a thrilling post about the school, but that is all I know about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2011, 06:28 PM
 
12,455 posts, read 27,063,999 times
Reputation: 6946
Marist is also the only one I know about. My son applied and was accepted there. We did a tour. Looked like a nice school with great facilities. I'm sure they get a lot of kids from NYC - it's far enough away to seem a little out of the ordinary, but easy to reach by train.
__________________
Please follow THESE rules.

Any Questions on how to use this site? See this.

Realtors, See This.

Moderator - Lehigh Valley, NEPA, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Education and Colleges and Universities.

When I post in bold red, that is Moderator action and per the TOS can be discussed only via Direct Message.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,038,923 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepTheIslanders50 View Post
ARE THESE CONSIDERED GOOD SCHOOLS?

WHICH ARE THE BEST ON THIS LIST AND THE WORST?

WHAT IS THE REPUTATION OF THESE SCHOOLS?

- MARIST COLLEGE in Poughkeepsie, NY
- MOLLOY COLLEGE in Rockville Centre, NY
- ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE in Patchogue and Bklyn (not to be mistaken for SJ University)
- SUNY OLD WESTBURY

HELP!!! Anyone who responds will get a reputation point
Marist is the only one I'm familiar with. I think it has a somewhat good reputation, if a very small liberal arts environment is what you're looking for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Does anyone one know anything about the University of Northern Iowa?
I think it's a pretty good school. Plays third fiddle in Iowa and is overshadowed a bit by ISU and the U of I. No engineering, I think the business school is decent. I've heard mixed reviews of Cedar Falls but have not been there myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top