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Old 08-22-2007, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Home of the Blockhouse Races
3,093 posts, read 6,441,444 times
Reputation: 3016

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Quote:
With all due respect, it sounds like you're looking for validation. A junior college certainly has a place in our society, but comparing it directly with a traditional four-year college or university displays a considerable lack of knowledge about the educational system.
I don't have to validate myself...I got my degree, yes, I got an AA from a CC, a BS from the State University...went into the Military. And I learned more from the professors in the CC than from the State University.

I have been a mom, quite successfully, I may add...and now my husband and I are enjoying our empty nest years.

I KNOW I got a valid, successful education. My professors were of high quality who taught for the love of teaching. I had one who was a State Senator, one who was on the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals, neither who taught for the money but because they wanted to pass on their craft.

I also had very little debt when I finished. Less than $5,000. How many of you going to a traditional 4 year can say that? Liz
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Old 08-22-2007, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Tuxedo Park, NY
419 posts, read 1,453,526 times
Reputation: 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernlady5464 View Post
Okay, so those of you who don't like CC, spend a fortune, go deep in debt.

For those willing to try it, you will be in good company: Outstanding Alumni (http://www.aacc.nche.edu/Content/NavigationMenu/AboutCommunityColleges/OutstandingAlumni/Notable_Alumni.htm - broken link)

Liz
I think that for each CEO and doctor on that list there are thousands who went to 4-year universities. I'll take my chances with the latter.

Besides...I went to a private 4-year university, B-school the same place, and I have no college debt. What's the big idea?
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Old 08-22-2007, 12:48 PM
dgz
 
798 posts, read 1,849,476 times
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That's great that you were able to do that, but there are a lot of people in school who may not be going into a field where they can make a lot of money quickly to pay off their loans. Some people may not get any money from their families or be able to work enough hours to pay off their tuition, board, etc. In those situations, doing your first two years at a community college might be a smart move.

Although my undergraduate degrees were earned through a 4-year college, I have since then taken many additional courses at 4-year colleges, graduate schools, online colleges, and yes... community colleges. For the courses that are commonly offered at all schools (i.e., the general core requirements for incoming freshman), I haven't seen a difference in the quality of the courses offered through one type of school vs. another. In some cases, the courses taken at the community college were better than their counterparts.

Several years ago, I decided to take a pre-med biology course because I was considering the possibility of going for a Master's in Psychology (with an emphasis on the biology) and I was surprised to walk into a classroom at my local university that had 200 students in it. It was so distracting. Whereas, I rarely see classes above 40 students at our local community college (because community colleges tend to just create more 'sections' as more students sign up). In retrospect, I would've taken that biology course at a community college.

Of course as you get into your upper-level undergraduate courses, the class sizes become smaller, but that usually occurs in the last 2 years of the 4-year degree.

Also, I've worked with quite a number of large corporations over the years and they have NEVER asked: Where did you attend school during your freshman and sophmore year? They have always asked (usually in this order):
  • Do you have an MS? (more recently)
  • Do you have a Bachelor's?
  • What is it in?
Sometimes, they will ask: Where did you graduate from?

Also, I can't comment on CEOs (because I've never seen a list of say... the top 2000 CEOS and the schools they attended and whether they spent their entire 4 years at that school). However, I know quite a few people who have started and ran their own companies, and they seem to represent a very broad range of educational levels. Some have PhDs and others have no degree at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WallStreetWarrior View Post
I think that for each CEO and doctor on that list there are thousands who went to 4-year universities. I'll take my chances with the latter.

Besides...I went to a private 4-year university, B-school the same place, and I have no college debt. What's the big idea?
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Old 08-22-2007, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Tuxedo Park, NY
419 posts, read 1,453,526 times
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Large class sizes are designed to create competition for floor time, and professor time. In the real world, I can's just raise my hand and have my boss call on me. I've got to make it a point to figure out where and when I can talk to him and make what I have to say remembered. Distracting? Yes, but isn't life distracting?
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Old 08-22-2007, 02:05 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,572 posts, read 9,507,471 times
Reputation: 2195
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernlady5464 View Post
I think you are right in that situation, however, I know of many 16/17 year olds, seniors in high school who are also taking college courses along with their senior classes. Liz
You are correct, Liz - they are either Huskin's students or dual-enrolled students. They apply to the college, take the placement tests that all applicants (except baccalaureate and higher) take, and if they meet the cut scores established by the state, they are able to enroll in courses. Some are taking AP classes at their home high school as well. It has been my experience teaching these children that they perform very well in college and beyond.
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Old 08-22-2007, 02:17 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,572 posts, read 9,507,471 times
Reputation: 2195
Quote:
Originally Posted by WallStreetWarrior View Post
Large class sizes are designed to create competition for floor time, and professor time. In the real world, I can's just raise my hand and have my boss call on me. I've got to make it a point to figure out where and when I can talk to him and make what I have to say remembered. Distracting? Yes, but isn't life distracting?
No, large classes are designed to cram the maximun number of bodies into an area to be lectured to by a lone professor. Good luck talking to the prof after class without making an appointment first.
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Old 08-22-2007, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Blackwater Park
1,716 posts, read 4,833,202 times
Reputation: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm_mary73 View Post
You mean to say that if a person started out at a community college and finished out at say, UNC-Chapel Hill, the student wouldn't get into a medical school?
All I was saying was that there is probably more of a chance that one's initial post-secondary education would matter to potential employers in the medical or law fields. Not that is neccesarily would, just the chances are greater.
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Old 08-22-2007, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Tuxedo Park, NY
419 posts, read 1,453,526 times
Reputation: 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm_mary73 View Post
No, large classes are designed to cram the maximun number of bodies into an area to be lectured to by a lone professor. Good luck talking to the prof after class without making an appointment first.
That's exactly what I said. Large classes are designed to simulate the real world. There's not that many jobs where it's you, 15 of your peers and one big boss man who you can talk to whenever you want.
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Old 08-22-2007, 07:17 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,572 posts, read 9,507,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in TN View Post
All I was saying was that there is probably more of a chance that one's initial post-secondary education would matter to potential employers in the medical or law fields. Not that is neccesarily would, just the chances are greater.
No, not really. Besides, physicians and attorneys are generally the employers, rather than the employees, unless they are working for larger groups. Then it becomes an question of who brings in the most $$. BTW, have you asked your healthcare provider where s/he went to college? You just might be surprized....
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Old 08-22-2007, 07:22 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,572 posts, read 9,507,471 times
Reputation: 2195
Quote:
Originally Posted by WallStreetWarrior View Post
That's exactly what I said. Large classes are designed to simulate the real world. There's not that many jobs where it's you, 15 of your peers and one big boss man who you can talk to whenever you want.
No, actually, you did not, but it's getting off-topic and I am weary of arguing. Where's Dingler, by the way? That imp always starts an interesting topic, then "disappears"
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