U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 11-02-2011, 03:27 PM
 
19,618 posts, read 13,709,132 times
Reputation: 8809
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunninRebel View Post
DeVry is sometimes ABET-accredited for engineering technology, never engineering. There is a difference.
Looks like you're right.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2011, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
16,356 posts, read 12,954,371 times
Reputation: 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suncc49 View Post
With the stupidly high cost of college education these days, liberal arts degrees and even some advanced degrees are not feasible to obtain unless you want to be a debt slave for life.

You will never be able to escape that debt racked up studying. Also you can pursue the topics or learn about them for free on the internet or library....
Thing is, as has been often-mentioned on this thread as well as others, the cost of college is not stupidly high for everyone. Plenty of us have been able to accomplish higher education with little to no debt, due to scholarships, grants, and/or savings, as well as through choosing judiciously and economically where we can get the most bang for the proverbial buck.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Seattle bound
286 posts, read 179,952 times
Reputation: 302
A couple of things y'all are overlooking in your arguments of where to go to school and how to pay for it...

One has to be accepted into a university -- especially graduate school. You can't just waltz up to a school and announce that you'll be attending their school, so kindly make room. And one has to be granted scholarships etc... You can't just say to these people, "Give me much as money as I need. I want to go to school." There's competition out there for everything, and not everyone can attend the college of their dreams, nor does everyone qualify for grants or scholarships. And, I'd like to point out, very few people in this world have enough savings to suddenly pay for four years of college and living expenses. Especially non-traditional students in interesting situations such as myself.

It's not as easy as y'all are making it sound.

Some of us have to take out loans if we want to get a college education, and some of us have to make to do with less than stellar schools since not everyone can attend top of the line colleges. I've worked hard for my Master's in less than ideal circumstances. And it's pissing me off that some of y'all are making it sound as if my degree is worth less than the paper it's printed on because I'm attending a state college, I'm getting a Master's in English, and I'm going into a lot of debt to pay for it. Honestly, I'd rather not have to take on this debt, but my circumstances leave me little choice. So kindly shove it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Middle America
16,356 posts, read 12,954,371 times
Reputation: 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by wscottling View Post
A couple of things y'all are overlooking in your arguments of where to go to school and how to pay for it...

One has to be accepted into a university -- especially graduate school. You can't just waltz up to a school and announce that you'll be attending their school, so kindly make room. And one has to be granted scholarships etc... You can't just say to these people, "Give me much as money as I need. I want to go to school." There's competition out there for everything, and not everyone can attend the college of their dreams, nor does everyone qualify for grants or scholarships. And, I'd like to point out, very few people in this world have enough savings to suddenly pay for four years of college and living expenses. Especially non-traditional students in interesting situations such as myself.

It's not as easy as y'all are making it sound.
No, it absolutely WAS NOT easy to qualify for a majority of grants and scholarships. It took a tremendous amount of work, diligence, and follow through. It also took being able to compete with others who wanted them, too. But given that that was my one realistic option to be able to attend affordably, that was just kind of how it went. And I didn't get 100% of my schooling funded in money I don't have to pay back (closer to 75%). But that definitely brought it into the realm of realistic expenditures in terms of money owed versus earning power.

Quote:
Some of us have to take out loans if we want to get a college education, and some of us have to make to do with less than stellar schools since not everyone can attend top of the line colleges. I've worked hard for my Master's in less than ideal circumstances. And it's pissing me off that some of y'all are making it sound as if my degree is worth less than the paper it's printed on because I'm attending a state college, I'm getting a Master's in English, and I'm going into a lot of debt to pay for it. Honestly, I'd rather not have to take on this debt, but my circumstances leave me little choice. So kindly shove it.
There's nothing wrong with going to a public university if the program is good, and obviously a great many are. For me, my local public u. would have cost me more, though, due to not offering the kind of grants and scholarships available to me via my private liberal arts college. It was no deal, in the end, in addition to not offering my preferences in terms of class size, location, and overall feel. But the programs were fine. In terms of public v. private, for me, it wasn't so much a statement on quality of program as it was personal preference and the overall sticker price in the end. A small private school paid me to attend. Easy choice.

I also am required, by legislation specific to my field, to complete my master's degree within the next four years, and would prefer not to have to incur a ton of debt to do that, either. As you put it, circumstances leave me little choice, though, unless I want to forfeit my job. So I've set a pretty good plan into place for doing it in a way that fits my budget and income. I know some people have employers who will pay for or subsidize master's programs...my SO, for instance, paid very little out of pocket for his due to his company's benefits package. Not so, in my field/with my employer. But that's life, and something I knew when signing the contract.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:11 PM
 
5,553 posts, read 7,451,050 times
Reputation: 5528
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
My university has a "no loan" policy. .... I basically chose to go to the school closest to my parent's home. It's often cheaper if you go closer to home... cuts out a bunch of expenses. It's not the best way to choose a school, but it worked out for me. They actually have a good network.

Princeton University - Welcome
According to that website, Princeton does use loans. Student Loans | PRINCETON UNIVERSITY - Office of Finance and Treasury

I don't see anything on the website regarding a "no loan" policy... maybe I'm missing it somewhere.

Also, if I am reading the information presented on the website correctly, the average cost per year is est. $52K!! http://www.princeton.edu/pr/aid/pdf/PU-aid-appl-info.pdf (broken link) That is just one place where it shows cost for the 2010-2011 year.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:17 PM
 
5,553 posts, read 7,451,050 times
Reputation: 5528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suncc49 View Post
Also you can pursue the topics or learn about them for free on the internet or library....
And how do you word that on your resume?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:19 PM
 
19,618 posts, read 13,709,132 times
Reputation: 8809
Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
According to that website, Princeton does use loans. Student Loans | PRINCETON UNIVERSITY - Office of Finance and Treasury

I don't see anything on the website regarding a "no loan" policy... maybe I'm missing it somewhere.

Also, if I am reading the information presented on the website correctly, the average cost per year is est. $52K!! http://www.princeton.edu/pr/aid/pdf/PU-aid-appl-info.pdf (broken link) That is just one place where it shows cost for the 2010-2011 year.
Princeton University | What's Great About Princeton's Financial Aid

Quote:
Since 2001, we have eliminated loans from our financial aid awards and replaced them with grant aid that students do not have to repay. Currently, the average financial aid grant covers 100 percent of Princeton’s tuition.
$52,000 per a year is high, yes.... but it's cancelled out by the fact that the average financial aid grant covers 100 percent of tuition.

This simple calculator will simplify it for you: http://sweb2.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/F...finaid_form.pl

If you're single, above 25, and make $50,000/year, you get a $50,000 grant towards your tuition and expenses. Not bad. Leaves you on the hook for about $3,000... which is affordable on that salary.

Last edited by NJBest; 11-02-2011 at 05:32 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:33 PM
 
5,553 posts, read 7,451,050 times
Reputation: 5528
OK, I see now... that is a really good deal if you can qualify and get accepted. Thanks for those links.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:43 PM
 
Location: USA
3,854 posts, read 5,741,132 times
Reputation: 1988
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Thing is, as has been often-mentioned on this thread as well as others, the cost of college is not stupidly high for everyone. Plenty of us have been able to accomplish higher education with little to no debt, due to scholarships, grants, and/or savings, as well as through choosing judiciously and economically where we can get the most bang for the proverbial buck.
That would be Texas unless you're going into nanoscience, then you'll be paying out the you know what.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 05:45 PM
 
19,618 posts, read 13,709,132 times
Reputation: 8809
Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
What Uni is this? I would like to know... in our not-so-distant future we have two kiddos to help through college...
Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
OK, I see now... that is a really good deal if you can qualify and get accepted. Thanks for those links.
Teach your kids about the hell of student loans.... maybe that'll motivate them to get accepted.

While Princeton was the first to adopt the no-loan policy, other schools have followed.

FinAid | Answering Your Questions | No Loans for Low Income Students

Quote:
No loans. These policies eliminate loans from the financial aid package of low income students. In Princeton's case, the loans are eliminated from the aid packages of all students, not just low income students. Other schools with no loan policies for low income students include Rice University, UNC Chapel Hill, University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top