U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:18 PM
 
4,340 posts, read 4,430,352 times
Reputation: 3318

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post
Aren't most of them need based aid?

Anyway, I was curious about this so I looked at harvard's financial aid calculator and this is what I came up with (this is for student from Texas):
Household Income > $250,000/yr = Tuition is $49,000/yr
Household Income > $200,000/yr = Tuition is $30,000/yr
Household Income > $150,000/yr = Tuition is $16,000/yr
Household Income > $100,000/yr = Tuition is $10,000/yr
Household Income > $50,000/yr = Tuition is $4,000/yr
Household Income < $50,000/yr = Tuition is $4,000/yr
^^ This is with all grants and scholarships lumped in.

Now compare that to a good state school where you will pay $5,000 - $10,000 per year no matter what your income level (with no grants/scholarships)

I think we can see that the private school will be just as expensive for some, but more expensive for a lot of others...
They are need based. Grades have very little to do with it. Like I said I know someone who had a 3.9 GPA @ a very prestigious private HS, a 1540/1600 on the SAT and a 35/36 on the ACT, but his parents made >250k and he paid 25k/year to go to Vanderbilt.

Now yes he could have gone to a small private university like Maryville for about 2-3k/year and received funding for more than need, but for the top private universities they are largely need based because everyone applying has a 1500+ on their SATs.

 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,039,692 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Sure you are. Unless you have a high income ($200k+), you're getting a significant amount of your tuition, boarding, and expenses paid for you. I already gave an example where my (private) school would have cost you $4,800 per year for ALL EXPENSES. On paper, my school costs $50,000.... but in reality, most students get close to a full ride.
Not really. The 09/10 average net price at Princeton was $17,568. Mizzou was at $15,202.

Now, Princeton's financial aid program is excellent. Low income students will find it a much better bargain than Mizzou ($4,995 vs $11,173 for the poorest students). But the average price ends up higher because a significant fraction of Princeton students come from very wealthy backgrounds and relatively few come from low-income backgrounds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Full professors=PhD. Most people that teach at the CC's here have a masters degree at best. At the private schools our kids are looking at, ALL of the professors have a PhD and teach classes. You don't see any grad students teaching at all. That is a full professor.
Handbook of Faculty Titles

I still don't understand why the PhD credential magically makes a graduate student qualified to teach...
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:40 PM
 
4,340 posts, read 4,430,352 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
Handbook of Faculty Titles

I still don't understand why the PhD credential magically makes a graduate student qualified to teach...
I agree....I'm not really following this either. So essentially completing all the coursework necessary for a PhD doesn't mean anything (ie the typical graduate student that is allowed to teach), but completing the research portion of a very specific topic area automatically qualifies you as an expert to teach a class based on a wide range of topics....

For example, right now I am a lowly graduate student who knows nothing, but is working on his dissertation. But when I finish my dissertation on measurement and analysis of a very specific construct in psychology I will suddenly be deemed an expert in all aspects of I/O and Social Psychology? In all honesty graduate students most often have a larger understanding of the current field as a whole than tenured faculty who have been studying a very specific topic (ie.team mental models) for the past 15 years.

How current do you think that prof. is on research relating to performance measurement?

How about that grad student that just had a seminar on the topic?

Imagine that....a Jayhawk and a Tiger agreeing on something.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:47 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,137,778 times
Reputation: 12779
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post
Aren't most of them need based aid?

Anyway, I was curious about this so I looked at harvard's financial aid calculator and this is what I came up with (this is for student from Texas):
Household Income > $250,000/yr = Tuition is $49,000/yr
Household Income > $200,000/yr = Tuition is $30,000/yr
Household Income > $150,000/yr = Tuition is $16,000/yr
Household Income > $100,000/yr = Tuition is $10,000/yr
Household Income > $50,000/yr = Tuition is $4,000/yr
Household Income < $50,000/yr = Tuition is $4,000/yr
^^ This is with all grants and scholarships lumped in.

Now compare that to a good state school where you will pay $5,000 - $10,000 per year no matter what your income level (with no grants/scholarships)... with grants and scholarships you could end up paying nothing or even making money to go there.

I think we can see that the private school will be just as expensive for some, but more expensive for a lot of others...
That doesn't look accurate at all for Harvard's tuition. Are you sure you aren't looking at Harvard's cost of attendance? Cost of attendance includes room & board among all other expenses.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:49 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,137,778 times
Reputation: 12779
Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
Not really. The 09/10 average net price at Princeton was $17,568. Mizzou was at $15,202.
Fair enough, but isn't the extra $2000 worth it to go to a good school?
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:51 PM
 
12,454 posts, read 27,080,128 times
Reputation: 6946
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzourah2006 View Post
95% of tenure track......that means 95% of the individuals trying to obtain tenure (ie assistant professors).

You specifically said...classes all taught by Full Professors, I was stating no schools have Full Professors that teach all of their classes and very few have Full Professors that even teach undergrads.


Plus the same statement could be made for CC's. Most people that teach at CCs have the highest degrees in their field (ie PhDs).

That blurb doesn't even state how many of those profs. teach classes.

I don't know of anyone at a state school that is on a tenure-track that doesn't have the highest degree in their respective field, so it is no different than any other college or university.
Point taken.
__________________
Please follow THESE rules.

Any Questions on how to use this site? See this.

Realtors, See This.

Moderator - Lehigh Valley, NEPA, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Education and Colleges and Universities.

When I post in bold red, that is Moderator action and per the TOS can be discussed only via Direct Message.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:54 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,137,778 times
Reputation: 12779
I think students tend to undervalue the importance of tenure. When selecting classes (at any good school), it is always in the students best interest to choose a class taught by a tenured professor.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,039,692 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Fair enough, but isn't the extra $2000 worth it to go to a good school? My attendance cost me nothing, btw.
I don't agree with the implication that Mizzou is not a good school (though I do hate their basketball program...)

But yes, I think Princeton is a good deal for many students (not, however, for those who are paying the rack rate). My intent was solely to introduce some actual data into this discussion, rather than relying on unrepresentative anecdotes.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:54 PM
 
4,340 posts, read 4,430,352 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Fair enough, but isn't the extra $2000 worth it to go to a good school?
lol, nice.....I guess my undergrad didn't meet your standards...no big deal it was good enough to get me into one of the top PhD programs in my area of psychology and give me the opportunity to work under one of the great minds in my field.

Plus......I just did the cost calculator...if....huge if....I could have gotten into Harvard I would have paid 47k/year.

Parents make 200k+, and was the oldest, so I was the only one in college at the time.

So no I would rather pay the 12k/year than the 47k/year to end up at the same place I am now.

I know a couple of people that went to the "great" school for undergrad (the Emory's, Vandy's, Wash U.'s, etc.) and they all ended up where I was, but with more debt.
 
Old 11-30-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
12,853 posts, read 10,206,269 times
Reputation: 11489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
Many are nice enough and many put in some effort but in general America is in serious trouble if these people are going to someday work in responsible positions in corporate America.
Don't worry about that, because they will never be put in responsible positions in corporate America. Those jobs will be largely reserved for those who at minimum performed well in reputable four-year colleges and universities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
Tell me the students are better in a four year college!
Depending on the school, they most certainly are.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top