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Old 12-01-2011, 08:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Last time I checked, the state schools were not public schools...also ONLY those certain credits transfer, not ALL of them, which is why I said they don't automatically transfer. Call the private schools in your area and ask about credit transfers....



Most elite private schools do NOT take credit for IB/AP any longer and if they do it is only for 4 or 5 on the tests. They will often give PLACEMENT but not credit. CC classes are not in the same league, at least here, with an AP/IB class.

As for your "many" kids that went to "elite" private colleges, they may have gotten prior approval for those classes or their school may have had an arrangement for those classes but if you call the admissions office directly at schools like Notre Dame, Harvard, etc. they will tell you flat out that they don't accept transfer credits from CC's or most 4-year schools. Notre Dame doesn't even accept dual enrollment credits from high school students per the admissions officer when we did our campus tour this past summer.
State schools are public schools since they are partially funded by the state.

My Alma Mater accepts some AP credit. Mostly 5s but 4s in some areas.

My Alma Mater does not accept any transfer credit from any type of university, whether 2-year or 4-year at the undergraduate level.

 
Old 12-01-2011, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Most elite private schools do NOT take credit for IB/AP any longer and if they do it is only for 4 or 5 on the tests. They will often give PLACEMENT but not credit. CC classes are not in the same league, at least here, with an AP/IB class.
Students admitted to the most competitive schools should certainly be able to earn a 4 or 5 on their AP exams.
 
Old 12-01-2011, 08:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
State schools are public schools since they are partially funded by the state.

My Alma Mater accepts some AP credit. Mostly 5s but 4s in some areas.

My Alma Mater does not accept any transfer credit from any type of university, whether 2-year or 4-year at the undergraduate level.
ok, typo...I meant PRIVATE schools...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
Students admitted to the most competitive schools should certainly be able to earn a 4 or 5 on their AP exams.
Maybe yes, maybe no, but this is why many schools have stopped giving actual credit for AP exam scores....

Are you and admissions rep for the U of M or something, you seem awfully defensive about anything against state schools??
 
Old 12-01-2011, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Maybe yes, maybe no, but this is why many schools have stopped giving actual credit for AP exam scores....

Are you and admissions rep for the U of M or something, you seem awfully defensive about anything against state schools??
I think research universities yield important benefits for society, public or private. Public funding ensures that this public good is provided.

That has nothing to do with my comment, though. If anything, I was complimenting highly-selective private schools on the quality of students they attract.
 
Old 12-01-2011, 10:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
I think research universities yield important benefits for society, public or private. Public funding ensures that this public good is provided.

That has nothing to do with my comment, though. If anything, I was complimenting highly-selective private schools on the quality of students they attract.
Again, even the top students at highly selective universities may or may not have gotten a 4 or 5 on every AP exam. A strong math student may only score a 2 or 3 on an English AP exam, for example. That doesn't make them a less viable candidate, especially since AP test scores have no bearing on admissions processes, especially considering that senior year tests haven't even been taken when applications are due.
 
Old 12-01-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Again, even the top students at highly selective universities may or may not have gotten a 4 or 5 on every AP exam. A strong math student may only score a 2 or 3 on an English AP exam, for example. That doesn't make them a less viable candidate, especially since AP test scores have no bearing on admissions processes, especially considering that senior year tests haven't even been taken when applications are due.
A 3 is really not a good score on most AP exams.

I didn't mean to imply that poor AP scores would cause someone not to gain admission to any school. Students with the academic record needed for admission also have the background needed to perform well on AP examinations. A little over 30% of students taking the AP English Language exam receive scores of 4 or 5. Only students with exceptional credentials in math (ie USAMO finalists) could realistically expect admission if their verbal skills are not good enough to reach the top 30% of that group. Exceptions exist, of course.
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
A 3 is really not a good score on most AP exams.

I didn't mean to imply that poor AP scores would cause someone not to gain admission to any school. Students with the academic record needed for admission also have the background needed to perform well on AP examinations. A little over 30% of students taking the AP English Language exam receive scores of 4 or 5. Only students with exceptional credentials in math (ie USAMO finalists) could realistically expect admission if their verbal skills are not good enough to reach the top 30% of that group. Exceptions exist, of course.
A student scoring a 3 on an AP exam may still score very well on the SAT or ACT portions to gain admissions to highly selective schools. The SAT or ACT exam score is much more important then any AP test score. AP test scores are really irrelevant to admissions. If you talk to any of the admissions counselors at any of the select schools, not schools like the U of M that take anyone, but schools like Harvard, Notre Dame, etc. grades and test scores are important but they first look at your class schedule and your essay, then test scores. A good student, but not a top student, can gain acceptance based on a fantastic essay as well. They certainly don't pigeon hole students saying that you have to have a 4.0 and a 33+ on an ACT before we will even look at you. I know plenty of 3.8 students with 29's on ACTs at top schools like Harvard because they are outstanding kids that do well in school but also are leaders in school, the community, etc. We had one such student from our school get accepted at 5 Ivy's and Notre Dame last year as a matter of fact.

Top schools do NOT want kids that all they do is study. Those are the kids that can't get into top schools. We had a student that got 5's on every single AP test he took. VERY bright kid, got turned down by all the Ivy's and similar because he had no outside interests. They don't want robots.
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:23 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,393 posts, read 9,437,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
If you talk to any of the admissions counselors at any of the select schools, not schools like the U of M that take anyone
May I ask which "U of M" you're referring to?
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
May I ask which "U of M" you're referring to?
Minnesota--Rock knew that...since I have a sneaky suspicion he works in admissions there--
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,040,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
A student scoring a 3 on an AP exam may still score very well on the SAT or ACT portions to gain admissions to highly selective schools. The SAT or ACT exam score is much more important then any AP test score. AP test scores are really irrelevant to admissions. If you talk to any of the admissions counselors at any of the select schools, not schools like the U of M that take anyone, but schools like Harvard, Notre Dame, etc. grades and test scores are important but they first look at your class schedule and your essay, then test scores. A good student, but not a top student, can gain acceptance based on a fantastic essay as well. They certainly don't pigeon hole students saying that you have to have a 4.0 and a 33+ on an ACT before we will even look at you. I know plenty of 3.8 students with 29's on ACTs at top schools like Harvard because they are outstanding kids that do well in school but also are leaders in school, the community, etc. We had one such student from our school get accepted at 5 Ivy's and Notre Dame last year as a matter of fact.

Top schools do NOT want kids that all they do is study. Those are the kids that can't get into top schools. We had a student that got 5's on every single AP test he took. VERY bright kid, got turned down by all the Ivy's and similar because he had no outside interests. They don't want robots.
I think you are arguing with someone, but I'm not sure who that person is. It certainly isn't me.

I'm not saying that it is impossible for a qualified student to score lower; everyone has bad days. My position: students with the skills needed to do well in high school courses and SAT/ACT exams also have the skills needed to do well on AP exams. They do not necessarily have the skills needed to succeed in college, which is exactly why colleges look at more than just those criteria.

The relevant question is where community college classes fall on that spectrum. I don't know, do you?
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