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Old 12-02-2011, 01:52 PM
 
2,721 posts, read 3,637,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
It's been shown in this thread that the middle-class (we used $80k as the income) qualify for need-based grants that make it cheaper to go to a 4-year school.

It's also been mentioned that many 4-year colleges do not accept transfers from community colleges.
But... Most 4-year schools do accept transfers, most universities don't give out "80K per year" need based grants. So how is it cheaper?

You can't look at a small sample of good universities to compare. For the majority of people, doing the 2 year CC thing and then transferring to a 4 year school will work out cheaper. Especially if you can live at home while at CC. Room and board can really add up.

It is my overall belief though that state schools are the better alternative to both of these options. A lot of them are ranked well, and can be very cheap to attend. Plus their alumni network will be tremendously larger than most private schools. In my experience, after your first job, no one gives a crap what school you attended (as long as it isn't UoP or an "internet based school.")

 
Old 12-02-2011, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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[quote=golfgal;21934723]The U of MN is a good school, but in-state, they take everyone. Now, that's not to say that if you apply late or whatnot you will get in but admissions certainly isn't as strict as other Big 10 schools nor is it as strict as any of the private schools in the state. Certain PROGRAMS are very difficult to get into but the University itself, not really.[/QUOT

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Seriously, "they take everyone"? That is so 1930s. State univeristies haven'ttaken everyone for decades. Also, you made an emphatic statement that 4 year colleges in MN do not accept CC credits. In fact, a lot of your posts reflect the situaion from 40 years ago or so. Colleges, all colleges, have become much more flexible in recent years.

.
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Maybe where you live but here, CC are NOT the same classes. They are not even taught by full professors. Sorry, they are not even close to the same.

ere classes don't automatically transfer and none of the private schools here accept CC credits....those 2 years at a CC would be a waste of money.

Can you hop over to the MN board and post this on the "Carleton Students" thread If you add in room and board for a CC student, even living at home they cost money, your costs are probably close to the same.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
NJ has something similar.

http://www.nj.gov/highereducation/PD...ementOct08.pdf

We also have NJ TRANSFER: Linking New Jersey's Colleges and Universities to map specific courses from school to school.

Unfortunately, it only applies to public schools. So it shuts out a lot of good choices.
As does Colorado.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
I think you are arguing with someone, but I'm not sure who that person is. It certainly isn't me.
Agreed.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:01 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,115,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post
But... most universities don't give out "80K per year" need based grants. So how is it cheaper?
If money was a concern, why wouldn't you choose to a school that covers you for the entire ride? Even if there are less of them, they are decent schools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post

You can't look at a small sample of good universities to compare. For the majority of people, doing the 2 year CC thing and then transferring to a 4 year school will work out cheaper. Especially if you can live at home while at CC. Room and board can really add up.
Need-based grants cover room and board. That's what makes it so attractive. In CC, you have to support yourself, and buy all your books out of pocket. Not the case with need-based grants at these 4-year private schools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post

It is my overall belief though that state schools are the better alternative to both of these options. A lot of them are ranked well, and can be very cheap to attend. Plus their alumni network will be tremendously larger than most private schools. In my experience, after your first job, no one gives a crap what school you attended.
I disagree. State school tuitions are rising, and rely on loans. This puts the students in debt. I see your point with the alumni network. A large public school such as Penn State U is going to have an enormous alumni network compared to my small private school's alumni network. But I feel that the rank of my school will stand out. Also, while we have a smaller alumni network, student's from my school generally hold higher positions than those from a school like Penn State U.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
If money was a concern, why wouldn't you choose to a school that covers you for the entire ride? Even if there are less of them, they are decent schools.
What about students who don't have the grades for an "entire ride?" Most students in America don't qualify for full rides you know...

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Need-based grants cover room and board. That's what makes it so attractive. In CC, you have to support yourself, and buy all your books out of pocket. Not the case with need-based grants at these 4-year private schools.
The point is that a lot of students don't qualify for need based grants. In fact, I'd wager that most students who go to college don't receive need based grants that cover enough expenses to make private school less expensive than CC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Also, while we have a smaller alumni network, student's from my school generally hold higher positions than those from a school like Penn State U.
Right, you went to Princeton ... Whoopeedeedoo!
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,038,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
If money was a concern, why wouldn't you choose to a school that covers you for the entire ride? Even if there are less of them, they are decent schools.
Your advice is great on an individual level, but it doesn't seem relevant here. There isn't enough room in such schools for every single community college student.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:23 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,115,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post
What about students who don't have the grades for an "entire ride?" Most students in America don't qualify for full rides you know...
CaptainNJ brought up a good example of a student that didn't have the grades. CC worked for him. Like I said, there's a place for CC schools. But it's mostly for people who do poorly in school. The rest, CC doesn't make sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post

The point is that a lot of students don't qualify for need based grants. In fact, I'd wager that most students who go to college don't receive need based grants that cover enough expenses to make private school less expensive than CC.
Most students don't qualify because the choose schools that do not have generous offering. Such as state schools that rely on students taking loans. We've already showed in this thread that students that have family incomes much higher than the median can get need-based grants at decent private schools such as Harvard, Yale, and yes, my Alma mater. But take a look at even other schools such as NYU, John Hopkins or UCLA. They have generous need-based grants as well.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:27 PM
 
1,109 posts, read 2,260,280 times
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OP correct me if I'm wrong but judging by your posts, do you teach at MC (Montgomery College)?

I'm currently in my 2nd yr of CC trying to get an A.A. in business so I can transfer to the state school to get a B.A. in management information systems. I mean there are probably a lot of people in my CC who aren't motivated or really shouldn't be there. But there is also a lot of them like me who want to start over and open doors to new opportunities. The CC I attend has a lot of opportunities here from getting a cert in first aid to being certified as an auto tech and a lot of good resources. Anyways, finals is coming up so I should get prepared for it.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Camberville
11,395 posts, read 15,991,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post
What about students who don't have the grades for an "entire ride?" Most students in America don't qualify for full rides you know...
Students who don't qualify for a significant amount of merit aid at a university (generally not the best they can get into) might not be ready for college yet. If you don't have the grades in high school, you're in a whole lot of hot water when you hit college.

I went to a prestigious college on a full tuition scholarship after turning down a few better schools. Many of my friends went to smaller, less prestigious colleges on merit scholarships when they could have gotten into similar levels of schools as I did. You can game the system - private schools generally offer better compensation packages than public, shoot for a tier down, and make excelling in high school your JOB.

My college accepted maybe 20 transfers a year. Community college applicants were not among them. We also didn't accept community college coursework for summer classes and the like because the quality was so varied.

Some states have better CC programs than others. California's are pretty decent, for instance. I took CC classes in high school and they were easier than my "normal" (not AP or IB) classes and the students were less driven, which I did not think was at all possible.
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Clifton, NJ
171 posts, read 353,526 times
Reputation: 213
I just gotta wonder how many people in here are either a) currently in college or b) recently, as in within the past few years, out of college.

I attended CC and I'm now in my senior year at a state university. To be specific, Ocean County College and Montclair State University in New Jersey. What can I say of my experience? Honestly, I put out about the same amount of effort at both school and have about the same GPA. 3.6 right now, I'd say I'm a pretty good student. As to the student population, I don't think one can make blanket statements about students anywhere. OCC had an extremely diverse student body- yes, we had our share of the students who wouldn't bother to show up, not hand anything in, seemed to be going nowhere in life. But we also had plenty of students who worked very hard. A lot were there on the NJSTARS scholarship, which is a full ride to a CC, then a state school for free for a student who graduated within the top 20% of their high school class and maintained I believe a 3.5 average. I think that program's gone now though. But I had classmates who transferred to Ivy League schools after OCC.
The Montclair population? Largely the same. I've met people who aren't worth a "dam," and people who are putting everything they've got into their education. When it comes down to it, CC's are the cheapest option for most people and a growing number of students are choosing them to begin their college careers. I don't regret it for a minute. I have a loan, but it's nowhere near some of the loans friends of mine at private schools have.

And the quality of the classes...maybe I'd see a difference if I was at a more "prestigious" university? It really has a lot to do with the professor. Maybe CC's end up with more lousy professors because they don't require PhD's for them, but I've taken some challenging classes at both my schools.

Just my 2 cents as a CC transfer finishing up at a Uni this spring

Last edited by Darkwolf131; 12-02-2011 at 02:46 PM.. Reason: more to say
 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:52 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,115,918 times
Reputation: 12779
Darkwolf131, I'm a recent graduate from an NJ-based school myself.
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