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Old 12-15-2011, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,290 posts, read 1,265,185 times
Reputation: 1097

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Gah, your parents have no clue what they're talking about. What employers want to know primarily is can you do the job they need done? Since you clearly gained a skillset in EE, you probably can do the job. Unless you're trying to work at Google right out of the gate I doubt too many employers are going to get too wrapped up in your GPA/transcripts. I've never heard of potential employers ask for transcripts (except for Accenture or Deloitte). You may have to start entry-level at a small firm but you'll be fine. Most people don't put GPA on their resume, unless it's high enough to work in your favor.

Grad school is a different situation, though. That GPA will hurt your chances big time.

Stop worrying about what others are telling you about your life and take control of it. Start networking and looking for jobs in your area. Use your school's career placement department. Get on Indeed.com. Start a LinkedIn page. Ask former professors for any leads. Good god just do SOMEthing other than post on C-D about it Best of luck!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZHP View Post
So I recently graduated from a University with an Electrical Engineering degree with a gpa of around 2.5 (considered in between B- and C+ at my school) , and my parents are telling me that my life is basically over and that I won't be able to get a decent Entry level Electrical Engineering job and that it's pretty much doom and gloom for my life from here on out.

I'm worried they are right, as even though I have been working on improving my resume from professors, Engineering professionals(who visited my school), I fear I won't be able to get any kind of entry level position at all if they ask for my transcript and gpa. And also, despite looking around for the past 3 ears or so, I have been unable to find an internship, so I dont have any internship experience ether. Not to mention I don't know if grad schools would let me in either because of my undergraduate performance.

Is it hopeless for me to be able to land an entry level position? I know I have not done the best in school, but I don't want to end up having a terrible life of not even being able to work in the field I graduated in because that would be a life that just isn't worth living.

I hope there is a chance for me, and thank you in advance for your answers.
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Old 12-15-2011, 11:34 PM
 
20,940 posts, read 16,389,436 times
Reputation: 9739
ZHP, I think there's a little over reaction here. Your academic career is most likely over... at least in terms of getting into a decent school

Don't feel discouraged though. The fact that you have the degree will be enough to get a good job and continue onto a great professional career. You'll be just fine. It is understood that EE is a difficult program and engineering jobs don't focus on GPA much. Get yourself a good internship, then a job, and ride the wave. Good luck!
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Old 12-15-2011, 11:36 PM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,709 posts, read 2,499,472 times
Reputation: 1999
Your outlook is not rosy unless you happen into a field that is understaffed and needs people with a pulse. Might should have considered this when you were making those grades.

BUT

If you do get in somewhere and work your butt off for 5 years and prove your worth, it won't matter much.
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Old 12-15-2011, 11:39 PM
 
4,503 posts, read 6,289,872 times
Reputation: 3052
Real Deal?

I am an EE. Less than great gpa on the BS. Big deal. But high numbers on the GRE, so Grad School (MS) was anywhere I wanted. Even more so for the PhD when I get back to it. Higher you go, it gets free, btw.

Real folks want to know that you can their job done. GPA is not where that is at.

If the moron you are talking to even asks about a gpa -- you know you are talking to a moron -- typically an HR type. Get past those gate keepers or do not waste your time with them.

Do you know what field you would like? Get a job -- any job -- that is somehow related to the field you want.

Want Power? Digging ditches for an Electrical Contractor will get you started.

Want medical/bio-med? Janitor in a hospital.

Weapons/MIC? Look at starting with the military.

Finagle your way towards what you want, and build the resume.

A strong experienced-based resume will carry you anywhere you want to go. Anymore, I way understate what I have done/can do so that customers/bosses are not intimidated.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Chicago
4,172 posts, read 4,652,080 times
Reputation: 4273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip T View Post
Real Deal?

I am an EE. Less than great gpa on the BS. Big deal. But high numbers on the GRE, so Grad School (MS) was anywhere I wanted. Even more so for the PhD when I get back to it. Higher you go, it gets free, btw.

Real folks want to know that you can their job done. GPA is not where that is at.

If the moron you are talking to even asks about a gpa -- you know you are talking to a moron -- typically an HR type. Get past those gate keepers or do not waste your time with them.
Agree... I've hired engineers for the largest engineering company in the world and not once did I ask for GPA. I looked at their work and personality fit.

For engineering sales/management roles (requiring engineering degree), GPA is less important. I know quite a few mediocre engineering students who became highly successful sales engineers/executives making 6 and 7 figures.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:50 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,012 posts, read 6,452,428 times
Reputation: 4125
It's not over.

I graduated with a cumulative GPA of 3.1 but a core GPA of 2.8 in Aero engineering. I still got a job. Then again I had internship experience ... but don't let that get you down.

Cast a wide net. Be open to learning stuff that you may not like ... maybe power systems ... or maintenance on old analog systems from the power company or phone company.

One consideration would be to apply for controls engineering jobs. As sensors get smaller, we'll be able to control more and more.

And do consider going to grad school somewhere else with a thesis option. This gives you "real world" experience while continuing your studies into something you find more interesting. And yes, you WILL need to focus. I have a full time job and finished my semester with two grad classes, one was a PhD level class, and and got A's in both, and with one class to go to get my Master's, I'm sitting on a 3.85 GPA. But I had almost zero social life and 1 free hour a day. That's it. It's a balancing act.
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Old 12-16-2011, 08:06 AM
 
4,503 posts, read 6,289,872 times
Reputation: 3052
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
Agree... I've hired engineers for the largest engineering company in the world and not once did I ask for GPA. I looked at their work and personality fit.
Sure. School is so hard that the real work is easy. Just making it through is a sign of capacity and task completion. And you are correct on the fit and work part.

As far as the work -- My experience is that usually folks are just fall-down happy that you can get the work done and that you are available. Project I am working now -- they were supposed to take a week to review their choices -- after I left the site visit, they called while I was driving home to hire me. In other cases I run across moron management who would want to fire me -- but I do such good work, the top project folks will not let them.

As far as fit, yeah that is a biggie, too. Folks want to be around folks they like and can work with. Who would not? Back to the OP -- remember how important it was to get good lab partners? Same in the real world.

Quote:
For engineering sales/management roles (requiring engineering degree), GPA is less important. I know quite a few mediocre engineering students who became highly successful sales engineers/executives making 6 and 7 figures.
Yeah, graduate school for the "mediocre," as you say -- is called an MBA.
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Old 12-16-2011, 09:26 AM
 
2,721 posts, read 2,202,309 times
Reputation: 1265
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZHP View Post
So I recently graduated from a University with an Electrical Engineering degree with a gpa of around 2.5 (considered in between B- and C+ at my school) , and my parents are telling me that my life is basically over and that I won't be able to get a decent Entry level Electrical Engineering job and that it's pretty much doom and gloom for my life from here on out.

I'm worried they are right, as even though I have been working on improving my resume from professors, Engineering professionals(who visited my school), I fear I won't be able to get any kind of entry level position at all if they ask for my transcript and gpa. And also, despite looking around for the past 3 ears or so, I have been unable to find an internship, so I dont have any internship experience ether. Not to mention I don't know if grad schools would let me in either because of my undergraduate performance.

Is it hopeless for me to be able to land an entry level position? I know I have not done the best in school, but I don't want to end up having a terrible life of not even being able to work in the field I graduated in because that would be a life that just isn't worth living.

I hope there is a chance for me, and thank you in advance for your answers.
Your parents are wrong. You can find a job with that GPA, but you will have to work hard at it. You are going to have to make a lot of calls and "pound the pavement."

The top engineering firms will probably not hire you-- but you should still apply.
However, there are many smaller engineering firms you need to consider.
A fellow engineer I knew was in a worse situation than you (2.2 GPA) and he found work after graduation as a field engineer for a well servicing company. With a $50,000 salary, that isn't too shabby.

My advice: Apply to every engineering/manufacturing/maintenance/computer/IT/construction company you can think of. Don't limit yourself to "google" or "apple" as those guys recruit the best. But EVERY company needs electrical engineers.
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Old 12-16-2011, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Chicago
4,172 posts, read 4,652,080 times
Reputation: 4273
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclone8570 View Post

The top engineering firms will probably not hire you-- but you should still apply.
I'm not sure if that is true. As I mentioned, I hired product engineers for the world's largest engineering co. (hint: it's German) and I never asked for GPA. But maybe that's just me, I may undervalue GPA. I guess it depends on the interviewer. I'm sure gatekeepers in HR will use GPA as a weed out for mass mailed resumes. But I rarely found applicants this way. Resumes were forwarded directly to me by other employees (e.g. whose family/friends were recent grads) or business contacts (e.g. vendors, customers). I also received resumes through an engineering association with which I'm involved. Usually, the applicant came highly recommended by someone I trusted. So I think that the NETWORKING is the most important thing.

I have also hired engineering techs directly from trade schools I worked with. These applicants always listed GPA as well as "attendance percentage" on their resumes (I think the school required it be listed when they forwarded resumes to me). I did use those 2 figures to weed out some applicants.

I also remember interviewing a grad from an excellent Indiana engineering school with a near perfect GPA. He went on and on about his GPA as he was most proud of it (as he should be). But despite the perfect GPA, I did not hire him as his personality was not at all the right fit for the company. He did not seem to be enough of a creative thinker.
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Old 12-16-2011, 10:45 AM
 
3,458 posts, read 1,542,603 times
Reputation: 1481
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZHP View Post
So I recently graduated from a University with an Electrical Engineering degree with a gpa of around 2.5 (considered in between B- and C+ at my school) , and my parents are telling me that my life is basically over and that I won't be able to get a decent Entry level Electrical Engineering job and that it's pretty much doom and gloom for my life from here on out.

I'm worried they are right, as even though I have been working on improving my resume from professors, Engineering professionals(who visited my school), I fear I won't be able to get any kind of entry level position at all if they ask for my transcript and gpa. And also, despite looking around for the past 3 ears or so, I have been unable to find an internship, so I dont have any internship experience ether. Not to mention I don't know if grad schools would let me in either because of my undergraduate performance.

Is it hopeless for me to be able to land an entry level position? I know I have not done the best in school, but I don't want to end up having a terrible life of not even being able to work in the field I graduated in because that would be a life that just isn't worth living.

I hope there is a chance for me, and thank you in advance for your answers.
i'm not in "Engineering", but i am in a technical field, and work with civil engineers. i had a 2.4 GPA and this never seemed to be an issue with any employer or interviewer. many employers don't even ask for your GPA, especially if they're a smaller, less bureaucratic outfit.

GPA is important for some of the really competitive jobs, and for grad school.
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