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Old 01-11-2012, 05:55 AM
 
511 posts, read 2,087,400 times
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FIRST THE GOOD NEWS: In today's economy having a college degree will help you get a job and college graduates do have a much lower unemployment rate than people with just a High School Diploma.

NOW THE BAD NEWS: Just having a college degree now days is pretty much worthless. About half of the graduates from the class of 2010 still do not have a professional job that requires a college degree. Most are either unemployed living with relatives, or working a minimum wage job in retail or something similar.

ANALYSIS: The lucky fifty percent either knew the right people, were really lucky, or more likely spent their four years doing everything they could to make themselves marketable to employers while in college.

QUESTION: What are you doing while in college to be in the fifty percent who will have a professional job at graduation?
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Old 01-11-2012, 06:52 AM
 
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Your logic does not hold up. Just because their job doesn't require a degree doesn't mean anything. They may very well have been offered the job because they had a degree. My employere doesn't require a degree either, but we look more favorably on people who do have degrees.

I'll let someone else post the facts that you are overlooking that relate to employment vs. education.
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Old 01-11-2012, 06:55 AM
 
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You're forgetting about those that go on to grad/med/law school
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:12 AM
 
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Source??? There is something missing in this because the numbers I have seen don't line up with this at all.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:21 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 37,688,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Source??? There is something missing in this because the numbers I have seen don't line up with this at all.
And my personal observation also does not line up with this at all.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:37 AM
 
511 posts, read 2,087,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Source??? There is something missing in this because the numbers I have seen don't line up with this at all.
OK then maybe 15% of college graduates go on to some post graduate program.

I still maintain that about half of the graduates who are looking for a professional job after graduation do not get one because they did not devote themselves to be a superior applicant while they were in college. They instead, just got a degree like everyone else. Now they don't stand out and are likely working as a Grocery Store Cashier for the rest of their lives at minimum wage and defaulting on their student loans.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:43 AM
 
7,495 posts, read 9,771,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
FIRST THE GOOD NEWS: In today's economy having a college degree will help you get a job and college graduates do have a much lower unemployment rate than people with just a High School Diploma.

NOW THE BAD NEWS: Just having a college degree now days is pretty much worthless. About half of the graduates from the class of 2010 still do not have a professional job that requires a college degree. Most are either unemployed living with relatives, or working a minimum wage job in retail or something similar.

ANALYSIS: The lucky fifty percent either knew the right people, were really lucky, or more likely spent their four years doing everything they could to make themselves marketable to employers while in college.

QUESTION: What are you doing while in college to be in the fifty percent who will have a professional job at graduation?
It's very important for college kids to be doing their networking, interning and/or a portfolio or other collection of their work depending on the field they're going into. Mainly it helps a lot to know somebody. Networking and interning particularly will do that.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 37,688,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
OK then maybe 15% of college graduates go on to some post graduate program.

I still maintain that about half of the graduates who are looking for a professional job after graduation do not get one because they did not devote themselves to be a superior applicant while they were in college. They instead, just got a degree like everyone else. Now they don't stand out and are likely working as a Grocery Store Cashier for the rest of their lives at minimum wage and defaulting on their student loans.

So, this is your personal opinion and not from a reliable source?
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Metairie, La.
1,156 posts, read 1,569,514 times
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Whether the OP is the author's own opinion or not, I thought the number was much, much lower, like 10% of those with a B.A. or B.S. degree will gain professional employment after college.

I'm an instructor at a university as I finish my PhD and I've heard from quite a few students (usually the better students) that they did the best they could and majored in stuff like banking and finance, marketing, business administration, education, etc. and still could find no work outside of college (other than poorly compensated internships). I see many of these students working in menial employment around the city and they usually ask me for advice. It's got to where I can't eat out without seeing a former student, who's usually my server.

I heard on NPR some time ago that there's a dire shortage of trained, journeyman electricians in this country -- that most are set to retire in the next 10 years. Then what the F will we do?

With this in mind, on the first day of any semester, I tell students that if they don't want to be in college classes (most don't), then they should quit immediately and go out and try to find a job. Once they get a job (like a McDonald's or something), they should work their way up the ladder and maybe, by the time they're 26, they could be a regional manager knocking down $50K a year, which is damn good money for somebody who has no college degree.

In addition, I inform them that the nation needs electricians, who are handsomely compensated. Trade schools for electrical work are out there, along with automotive repair, truck driving, plumbing, gaming, etc. In short, I tell students that there are other options because the sad fact is that the majority of the 20,000 students at my university will spend 5 years working toward a B.A. or B.S. degree and AFTER they get it, most will be asking me if I want fries with my order.

It usually doesn't work, though. Most students remain in whatever class I'm teaching and they do sloppy work, which reflects their lack of interest in college altogether in my opinion.
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,823,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
OK then maybe 15% of college graduates go on to some post graduate program.

I still maintain that about half of the graduates who are looking for a professional job after graduation do not get one because they did not devote themselves to be a superior applicant while they were in college. They instead, just got a degree like everyone else. Now they don't stand out and are likely working as a Grocery Store Cashier for the rest of their lives at minimum wage and defaulting on their student loans.
31.1% go into a post graduate program immediately after college.
48.0% planned to enter a graduate program within 5 years.
16.3% were making minimum wage or less, with almost all of those earning nothing.
Ironically, the ones who graduated the most quickly were by far the most likely to be earning low wages. For those who took the longest time to graduate, 41.4% were earning over $45k immediately after graduation (over twice the rate for those who graduated in 4 years or less).
Of course, this reflects that those who graduated in 4 years are also a big chunk of those who went straight into grad school.
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