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Old 02-14-2012, 10:07 PM
 
257 posts, read 741,769 times
Reputation: 196
Default Not mechanically inclined but wants to study engineering...

Hello

I'm just throwing this question out here to spark some discussion.

Let's say a high school student gets excellent grades in math and science. They want to pursue a degree in engineering but they aren't mechanically inclined. Would it be ill advised to pursue a degree in something like mechanical or civil engineering? What about other branches of engineering?

Thank you
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Old 02-15-2012, 07:51 AM
 
142 posts, read 162,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastwestman View Post
Hello

I'm just throwing this question out here to spark some discussion.

Let's say a high school student gets excellent grades in math and science. They want to pursue a degree in engineering but they aren't mechanically inclined. Would it be ill advised to pursue a degree in something like mechanical or civil engineering? What about other branches of engineering?

Thank you
Don't do Civil unless you want less pay for more competition within your job market.

I recommend these:

-Chemical Engineering
-Mechanical Engineering
-Nuclear Engineering
-Petroleum Engineering
-Aerospace Engineering
-Electrical Engineering
-Computer Engineering

I do not recommend these:

-Architectural Engineering
-Environmental Engineering
-Civil Engineering
-Geosystems/Hydro-geological Engineering

Here is a good website for learning about employment prospects for them:
List of SOC Occupations

And for starting salaries:
Best Undergrad College Degrees By Salary
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Old 02-15-2012, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Duarte, CA
4,998 posts, read 4,990,568 times
Reputation: 3215
You could do Industrial Engineering..
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:40 PM
 
143 posts, read 151,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J152cc2 View Post
Don't do Civil unless you want less pay for more competition within your job market.
As a civil engineer I haven't noticed any of this.

And Geotech has something like a 0% unemployment rate if I remember right. Also, I would wager Enviro would be in an upward trend in demand.

All of these other engineering disciplines you mentioned are fine professions of course.
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Old 02-17-2012, 07:23 AM
 
142 posts, read 162,378 times
Reputation: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEnterprises View Post
As a civil engineer I haven't noticed any of this.

And Geotech has something like a 0% unemployment rate if I remember right. Also, I would wager Enviro would be in an upward trend in demand.

All of these other engineering disciplines you mentioned are fine professions of course.
Where I live (Texas), Civil gets paid the least. Plus they have a lot of competition. As an example, look at the amount of Civil Engineers that took the P.E. exam recently in Texas: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE EXAMINATION BY DISCIPLINE

685 Civil Engineers. Compare that to the number of Nuclear Engineers... 2.

I'm not saying you can't get a good job with it-- it just won't be one that pays as much as some of the other majors. (unless you are a stellar student / outlier)
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Old 02-18-2012, 08:47 AM
 
143 posts, read 151,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J152cc2 View Post
Where I live (Texas), Civil gets paid the least. Plus they have a lot of competition. As an example, look at the amount of Civil Engineers that took the P.E. exam recently in Texas: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE EXAMINATION BY DISCIPLINE

685 Civil Engineers. Compare that to the number of Nuclear Engineers... 2.

I'm not saying you can't get a good job with it-- it just won't be one that pays as much as some of the other majors. (unless you are a stellar student / outlier)
That's a little misleading because there are also bound to be more civil jobs out there than other engineering jobs (in pure numbers I mean) but you are right when you say a civil engineer probably wont make as much as an aerospace engineer or such.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: New York
601 posts, read 432,019 times
Reputation: 264
I'm in the same situation. The OP wants to know if, although he/she is not mechanically inclined, engineering would still be a possible option.
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
3,383 posts, read 3,269,393 times
Reputation: 1369
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastwestman View Post
Hello

I'm just throwing this question out here to spark some discussion.

Let's say a high school student gets excellent grades in math and science. They want to pursue a degree in engineering but they aren't mechanically inclined. Would it be ill advised to pursue a degree in something like mechanical or civil engineering? What about other branches of engineering?

Thank you
I know someone with a biomedical enginnering and an aerospcae engineering degree and working on her doctorate.


She calls me every time she gets an oil change for advice on her car. She built a radioflyer wagon wrong and cut herself on a child safety feature on a bottle of dish detergent.

I work with a lot of engineers most are not that mechanically inclined a lot of times the mechanically inclined people tell them the fix and they come up with the fix and they justify and validate it with engineering.


Don't get me wrong there are a bunch of mechanically inclined engineers out there.

Sent from my autocorrect butchering device.
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,542 posts, read 8,489,015 times
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OK, voice of some experience talking here. I tried that and failed miserably. Fortunately I figured it out pretty quick--my advisor had me take a drafting class (back in the old days before CAD) and I failed so bad it wasn't even funny. The reason? I couldn't "see" the way an engineer needs to be able to. It hasn't got anything to do with intelligence--you could be a math whiz but if you can't see like an engineer, you'll be spinning your wheels. My father taught EE and maybe he thought I was dumb and maybe he understood but it's the class that separates the engineers from the non-engineers so take that first--nowadays I guess it would be a CAD class.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:33 PM
 
Location: New York
601 posts, read 432,019 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
OK, voice of some experience talking here. I tried that and failed miserably. Fortunately I figured it out pretty quick--my advisor had me take a drafting class (back in the old days before CAD) and I failed so bad it wasn't even funny. The reason? I couldn't "see" the way an engineer needs to be able to. It hasn't got anything to do with intelligence--you could be a math whiz but if you can't see like an engineer, you'll be spinning your wheels. My father taught EE and maybe he thought I was dumb and maybe he understood but it's the class that separates the engineers from the non-engineers so take that first--nowadays I guess it would be a CAD class.
How do you "see" like an engineer? What's involved?
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