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Old 10-12-2007, 09:10 PM
 
1,031 posts, read 1,772,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anchorless View Post
Bad time to be going into law. With the job prospects weighed against the ever increasing tuition costs, I'd say wait until some reform comes along (and it will), or the market improves.

Read this: Empirical Legal Studies: Distribution of 2006 Starting Salaries: Best Graphic Chart of the Year
Good grief! That was a brutally honest article. I have looked and researched all the stats / numbers from the other sites, and that really opened my eyes. I have been concerned about the debt I would be in after graduation. That's one of the huge negatives on my list. Another thing I was worried about was the type of hours I would have to work. I know I could spend hours researching / writing etc, I actually enjoy that. I also think I would be good in a court room. But my family is my number one priorty, as an attorney would I still be able to go to their games, etc? I wouldn't want to miss them. But that's also a negative of being a NP / midwife babies don't come at scheduled or convenient time. However, with nurses in such high demand, there would be virtually no debt.

Just for some background. If an attorney, I would want to practice Family Law or do something in Child Advocacy. If a NP / midwife I would eventually want to open a birthing center in a rural area.


Thanks everyone for your advice and words of wisdom so far!
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 1,951,498 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anchorless View Post
There are still a lot of options out there for you, duder.

The hiring prospects suck, especially coming from (Samford, I assume?), but you need to spend all of your efforts being creative, and finding a niche. Public interest, perhaps. Start your own business. There a million things to do, and if you need help with some resources to help you out, let me know.

But yeah, its certainly a bleak, bleak time to be entering the legal field.
Yeah I'm at Samford. Looked like a good school. The quality of teaching is excellent. The reality of the legal job market though is rough and I haven't even really enjoyed what I'm learning about.
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Old 10-13-2007, 12:34 AM
 
18 posts, read 29,060 times
Reputation: 16
I Always Wanted To Be A Lawyer...not An Ambulance Chaser.. I Want To Work For The Little Guy.. I Always Said I Would Be The Only Poor Lawyer In The U.s.a....lawyers Do Not Practice Law Any More.. They Are All About The Money..and It Is So Sad..where Is The Passion For Doing What Is Right Thing. Even If You Do Not Get Rich..i Am 45 And My Children Are Grown Now So I Am Going To Start Nursing School In Jan.. God Willing... And Go On To Be An R.n.
I Love The Excitement Of Being An E.m.t And Being A Nurse Was Always My Second Dream.. And At My Age The Best Choice For Me At This Time. Being A Nurse You May Have To Deal With Death,, It Is A Part Of Life. But At Least You Know You Have Done Everything To Make Someone's Last Day The Best It Could Be. And If You Want To Be A Lawyer.. I Am Not Saying Don't Make Money, But Do Not Allow The Money Get In The Way Of Why You Want To Be A Lawyer. And I Hope That Reason Is To Help People, To Give Children And The Poor A Voice. Good Luck To You..follow Your Heart..hugs And God Bless, Betty In Illinois
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Old 10-13-2007, 06:05 AM
 
999 posts, read 1,955,740 times
Reputation: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by happeemommee View Post
Good grief! That was a brutally honest article. I have looked and researched all the stats / numbers from the other sites, and that really opened my eyes. I have been concerned about the debt I would be in after graduation. That's one of the huge negatives on my list. Another thing I was worried about was the type of hours I would have to work. I know I could spend hours researching / writing etc, I actually enjoy that. I also think I would be good in a court room. But my family is my number one priorty, as an attorney would I still be able to go to their games, etc? I wouldn't want to miss them. But that's also a negative of being a NP / midwife babies don't come at scheduled or convenient time. However, with nurses in such high demand, there would be virtually no debt.

Just for some background. If an attorney, I would want to practice Family Law or do something in Child Advocacy. If a NP / midwife I would eventually want to open a birthing center in a rural area.


Thanks everyone for your advice and words of wisdom so far!
I think most people enter the law intending to do good, but the realities of the system don't make it entirely possible. For those that continue with their crusade, they typically have huge debt hanging over their heads.

The golden rules are these:

1. Don't go to law school unless you're absolutely sure you want to practice law - don't go because you don't know what else to do or because it seems like a glamorous or lucrative field.

2. Either get into a top 20 school or so, or go to the best deal you can find in the region you want to work. Unfortunately for most they're not going to get out of law school with less than 100K worth of debt. Do the math - these are some significant loan repayments for 10-20 years, and make it hard, if not impossible, to take lower paying public interest type jobs. In fact, I'd say that you probably shouldn't pay more than 60K total for a JD if it isn't from a top 20 school.

If anyone is interested, I can post some links for more information about law school, placement, and the financial aspects of the choice.
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Old 10-13-2007, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 1,951,498 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anchorless View Post
I think most people enter the law intending to do good, but the realities of the system don't make it entirely possible. For those that continue with their crusade, they typically have huge debt hanging over their heads.

The golden rules are these:

1. Don't go to law school unless you're absolutely sure you want to practice law - don't go because you don't know what else to do or because it seems like a glamorous or lucrative field.

2. Either get into a top 20 school or so, or go to the best deal you can find in the region you want to work. Unfortunately for most they're not going to get out of law school with less than 100K worth of debt. Do the math - these are some significant loan repayments for 10-20 years, and make it hard, if not impossible, to take lower paying public interest type jobs. In fact, I'd say that you probably shouldn't pay more than 60K total for a JD if it isn't from a top 20 school.

If anyone is interested, I can post some links for more information about law school, placement, and the financial aspects of the choice.
I'm going to a tier 3 school but I think it has a pretty good reputation here in the Southeast and would also be considering tax law, a specialty for which I thought there would be a shortage. It seems like a lot of abuse to go through for a job that doesn't really pay that well since realistically I wouldn't want to work for a big firm. Also I've heard that in tax you need a big firm or big city as well. Additionally I would be permanently stuck in the Southeast, not that I don't like it here but I'm from up North and like it up there as well. I think tax law could be a very boring field after a while. I did an internship and sort of enjoyed it because some of the code, etc was a novelty but I don't want to talk myself out of what could already be a good career. I'm not at a top 20 school and I would be paying 150k, but in the Southeast which arguably has a much stronger legal market than other areas of the country. Still don't think it's worth it so I need to find out more and am also considering nursing.
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Old 10-13-2007, 12:05 PM
 
3,712 posts, read 4,117,506 times
Reputation: 1274
Here is a site with info on Advanced Practice Nursing:

http://www.allnursingschools.com/faqs/apn.php

I have a friend who is a CNM (Certified Nurse Midwife) and she loves her job. She is in a practice with 2 other CNM's and an OB. She cares for her patients through their pregnancy and delivers their baby. There is none of this 'whoever is on call will deliver your baby' business that seems to be going on with more and more OB practices. CNM's patients get loads of personal attention and there is alot of patient teaching in areas such as diet and exercise. In general, they have more time to spend with patients. For a low risk delivery, this is a good option, IMO. Hours will be erratic, but nursing just isn't a 9-5 Monday thru Friday type job.

American College of Nurse Midwives:
http://www.acnm.org/

All CRNA (Certified Register Nurse Anesthetist) programs require either a BSN or baccalaureate degree in other area (what is acceptable is decided by the individual school). You must be a licensed RN with at least one years experience in an acute care setting (ICU, ER, etc.). Most programs run 36 months, it used to be 24. Keep in mind that as a CRNA (or CNM) you will be functioning very autonomously. You are overseen by an MD but you will be making alot of decisions on your own. Not all people are comfortable with this.

American Association on Nurse Anesthetists:
http://www.aana.com/ click on 'becoming a CRNA'

Pay and job opportunities are good for both. I don't know much about NP or CNS so I can't comment on those specialties.
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Old 10-13-2007, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
2 posts, read 4,875 times
Reputation: 10
I have been an attorney in family law for nearly twenty years. I am getting out of the profession. I think you enter that area of practice with the best of intentions but the realities drag you down. When I started out I couldn't understand the jaded, burned out lawyers 20 yrs. my senior. I now know how they felt. It's a very emotionally draining area of the law, and if I had it to do over again I would have more variety in my practice. Just some thoughts.
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Old 10-15-2007, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 1,951,498 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreabeth View Post
Here is a site with info on Advanced Practice Nursing:

Advanced Practice Nursing

I have a friend who is a CNM (Certified Nurse Midwife) and she loves her job. She is in a practice with 2 other CNM's and an OB. She cares for her patients through their pregnancy and delivers their baby. There is none of this 'whoever is on call will deliver your baby' business that seems to be going on with more and more OB practices. CNM's patients get loads of personal attention and there is alot of patient teaching in areas such as diet and exercise. In general, they have more time to spend with patients. For a low risk delivery, this is a good option, IMO. Hours will be erratic, but nursing just isn't a 9-5 Monday thru Friday type job.

American College of Nurse Midwives:
Midwifery Week Celebration

All CRNA (Certified Register Nurse Anesthetist) programs require either a BSN or baccalaureate degree in other area (what is acceptable is decided by the individual school). You must be a licensed RN with at least one years experience in an acute care setting (ICU, ER, etc.). Most programs run 36 months, it used to be 24. Keep in mind that as a CRNA (or CNM) you will be functioning very autonomously. You are overseen by an MD but you will be making alot of decisions on your own. Not all people are comfortable with this.

American Association on Nurse Anesthetists:
AANA - Home click on 'becoming a CRNA'

Pay and job opportunities are good for both. I don't know much about NP or CNS so I can't comment on those specialties.
Is nursing a good job for somebody with anxiety? I have a lot right now being in law school and knowing that if I don't get in the top 30 percent or so competing against a lot of other kids and paying 150,000 for the privilege that I'm going to be really miserable and making $45 grand a year for long hours and that amount of debt with no job security. Enough to give me tension headaches, make me depressed, and panic a whole lot. My parents want me to stay in because they think I'll get a good job, but even getting government ones is still kind of rough. My mom says that she couldn't see me doing nursing and that I couldn't deal with someone who got their arm or leg chopped off. I might not be cut out for ER nursing but there's other stuff that I could do. I want a job/job security and to be useful to people in some capacity. I want to feel good about myself but with the incredibly competitive grind of law school and enormous cost I don't think its entirely a possibility.
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Old 10-15-2007, 01:17 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,564 posts, read 9,412,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wallstreet1986 View Post
Is nursing a good job for somebody with anxiety? I have a lot right now being in law school and knowing that if I don't get in the top 30 percent or so competing against a lot of other kids and paying 150,000 for the privilege that I'm going to be really miserable and making $45 grand a year for long hours and that amount of debt with no job security. Enough to give me tension headaches, make me depressed, and panic a whole lot. My parents want me to stay in because they think I'll get a good job, but even getting government ones is still kind of rough. My mom says that she couldn't see me doing nursing and that I couldn't deal with someone who got their arm or leg chopped off. I might not be cut out for ER nursing but there's other stuff that I could do. I want a job/job security and to be useful to people in some capacity. I want to feel good about myself but with the incredibly competitive grind of law school and enormous cost I don't think its entirely a possibility.
Tell her that traumatic limb amputations aren't that common; usually it's a finger or two, or a toe. LOL Of course, it's not as cool to tell your friends about "my son the nurse", rather than "my son the lawyer". I agree with your plan to finish out the semester and take stock of what you really believe your calling is and then do it. You can take your parents' concerns into consideration, but ultimately it is your life and your choice. Life is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay to short to be doing something you despise.
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Old 10-15-2007, 02:36 PM
 
3,712 posts, read 4,117,506 times
Reputation: 1274
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallstreet1986 View Post
Is nursing a good job for somebody with anxiety? I have a lot right now being in law school and knowing that if I don't get in the top 30 percent or so competing against a lot of other kids and paying 150,000 for the privilege that I'm going to be really miserable and making $45 grand a year for long hours and that amount of debt with no job security. Enough to give me tension headaches, make me depressed, and panic a whole lot. My parents want me to stay in because they think I'll get a good job, but even getting government ones is still kind of rough. My mom says that she couldn't see me doing nursing and that I couldn't deal with someone who got their arm or leg chopped off. I might not be cut out for ER nursing but there's other stuff that I could do. I want a job/job security and to be useful to people in some capacity. I want to feel good about myself but with the incredibly competitive grind of law school and enormous cost I don't think its entirely a possibility.
It sounds likemost of your anxiety is related to the possiblity of not being able to find a decent job in law rather than a fear of blood and injuries. If you are considering nursing, check around and see if a program near you has a 'career day' type arrangement where you could follow a nurse for a day and get a feel for what it is like. Unless you are overseas in Iraq or Afghanistan you won't be seeing traumatic limb amputations on a regular basis. Also there are specific types of nursing where you just won't be dealing with blood and ER type things much, such as psychiatiric nursing or community health nursing.
I would say the job security is good, there is a nursing shortage right now so you probably would not have much trouble landing a job. It is not a 9-5 type job and most of the time it is hard work, but there is a sense of satisfaction that you don't find with many other jobs. The majority of patients and their families are very grateful for the care you provide and you can't put a price tag on that.
Someone else may be able to provide figures on starting salaries for RNs. I think the pay is pretty decent now.
Hope that was helpful.

Andreabeth (retired CRNA)
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