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Old 07-19-2013, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
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I hear often that graduate programs such as MBA and Law could really care less what you did for your bachelors degree. So it seems like most of these type of master programs just want you to go to a credited school with a good reputation and experience. Is it wise to major in something else in your bachelors that's opposite from your masters or is it safe to alway stay focused on one type of study since your freshman year in college?
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Old 07-19-2013, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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Dont know about MBA but Law schools only care about two things: GPA and LSAT scores
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Old 07-19-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick5575 View Post
Dont know about MBA but Law schools only care about two things: GPA and LSAT scores
So pretty much you can literally major in anything other then LAW for bachelors but as long as you maintain a high GPa and do good on your LSAt. Your good to go?
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Old 07-19-2013, 09:45 AM
 
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Law school only cares about GPA and the LSAT. A 4.0 in fashion studies with an LSAT of 177 will get you into a t5 given everything else is solid.

There are many different MBA programs; some require work experience, gpa factors, GMAT scores, etc. More factors to an MBA than law in my opinion due to the different MBA programs available.
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:10 PM
 
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OP: Generally speaking, yes. For an MBA, you need a good test score and a business framework to build upon; if you do not have the requisite business classes to begin with you cannot hop right into MBA work. So with that example, someone cannot take their Religious Studies degree and jump into MBA classes at any reputable institution. The same for engineering and other technical fields. You can take that Religious Studies degree and jump into a MA in Communication. Law schools don't expect you to know any law going in. They want a student who did well in college (GPA) and has the aptitude (LSAT) to likely graduate law school.
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:30 PM
 
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In general, MBA programs don't care about major either. Besides the GPA test, test scores, work experience, etc., MBA programs will require business prerequisites. When I was completing my BA in Social Science, I was contemplating using my free electives to complete the business prerequisites. Some programs might require as little as 4-6 business prerequisites while others will require as much as 8-10. It's really not that difficult to complete the prerequisites within your degree or after completing it. People do it all the time. Some programs will even let you CLEP out of the prerequisites. There are a few MBA programs I've seen that offer some sort of bootcamp to get non-business majors up to speed. I've also seen ones that offer the prerequisites within the program.
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: NW Penna.
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I was told (back in 2009) that in the state of Ohio anyone with a BA/BS degree can get a masters in counseling and work as a counselor. It was at a healthcare careers fair and the man who said that had a degree in art and was working as an addictions counselor.

When deciding what you want to do with a living, take into consideration whether or not the undergrad degree actaully teaches you anything useful. For example, a degreed engineer with work experience and a law degree can go into patent law or a lot of other legal work in areas that a liberal arts grad + law degree would not be recruited for.
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Old 07-19-2013, 03:44 PM
 
1,866 posts, read 998,950 times
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Originally Posted by SorryIMovedBack View Post
I was told (back in 2009) that in the state of Ohio anyone with a BA/BS degree can get a masters in counseling and work as a counselor. It was at a healthcare careers fair and the man who said that had a degree in art and was working as an addictions counselor.

When deciding what you want to do with a living, take into consideration whether or not the undergrad degree actaully teaches you anything useful. For example, a degreed engineer with work experience and a law degree can go into patent law or a lot of other legal work in areas that a liberal arts grad + law degree would not be recruited for.
That is not true, if two people get a degree, one in liberal arts and the other in engineering and both get a law degree from the same school, then both people will have the same opportunities in law.
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Blackscorpion View Post
That is not true, if two people get a degree, one in liberal arts and the other in engineering and both get a law degree from the same school, then both people will have the same opportunities in law.
It's not equal. He already explained to you why that is the case.

If you graduate with a qualifying STEM degree, then the USTPO will allow you to sit for the patent bar after you get your law degree. Then, you can qualify to be a patent attorney. Since most law grads have undergraduate majors that do not qualify, your patent bar/law combo is very confining and lucrative, and probably increases your job prospects as an attorney by at least a factor of 3.

In reality, it's even rougher than that! My undergraduate (civil) engineering degree allows me to sit for the patent bar, but it is not a 'desirable' degree in patent law and intellectual property. So, the chances of me becoming a patent attorney become much less. In reality, there are 5-6 desirable majors in patent law.

It's helpful to think about these things when deciding your undergraduate major, so you don't close off your options. An Electrical Engineering degree is the most useful degree at THIS TIME (2013). That could change. Not that I'm saying everyone should major in that. But in any case, such foresight helps.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:02 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 4,103,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nycjowww View Post
I hear often that graduate programs such as MBA and Law could really care less what you did for your bachelors degree. So it seems like most of these type of master programs just want you to go to a credited school with a good reputation and experience. Is it wise to major in something else in your bachelors that's opposite from your masters or is it safe to alway stay focused on one type of study since your freshman year in college?
It depends on the field you go in but I would say in most cases it is better to get a grad degree in a different area from your BA. It shows you are flexible, can learn new things, and you will have a more broad knowledge base. There are exceptions to this.

MBA is a great example. It was originally designed for Engineers to learn about business. Getting a degree in Business then getting an MBA is just redundant.

I did accounting and econ undergrad. Now im doing Information Systems for grad. This is a hot combo right now. Likewise accounting mixes well with law.

In the job market you want to set yourself apart.
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