U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2013, 01:48 AM
 
2,331 posts, read 2,269,510 times
Reputation: 1121

Advertisements

Let's be honest, the workload in a community college is not as stressful or as much as a four year university. I know folks who got good grades at the CC level, but dropped once they hit the four year and i wonder why is that?

is the course work at a 4 year so much more even if they are about the same length in time? i'm speaking relatively classes one could find within both places, like english/lit, history or math/psychology.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-30-2013, 03:53 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,354,094 times
Reputation: 10471
First thing they should know is if they plan to go to a 4 year college, research, in advance, which school you will transfer to and IF they accept CC credits.

Second, if you are an above average student or better, most likely going the CC route is going to cost you MORE in the long run.

Third, yes, the workload is going to be more in a 4 year college because they expect more and you are sitting in a room with better students all around. Even if you have the same amount of homework, the quality of that homework will be judged differently compared to your peers. If you are in a math class with a bunch of kids that are taking the class just because it's a "gen ed" vs a bunch of kids that want to become engineers...do you really thing the prof in the 4 year school is going to let much slide?

Community colleges have their place but they are not the money saver people make them out to be and they are not generally the best stepping stone for kids that really want to go to a 4 year college.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:09 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,038 posts, read 9,781,545 times
Reputation: 18860
Instructors at community colleges are more understanding of outside obligations. Instructors in community college are primarily focused on teaching, at universities their primary focus is research. At universities you are expected to be able to succeed on your own, at community colleges they will try to help you pass - extra credit is a rarity in universities. At 4-year colleges, as a matter of fact, some professors are proud of their flunk rate. Community college classes and 4-year colleges may have classes with the same name but they may not really be the same class at all, which why they don't always transfer. Community life is far better and more diverse a 4-year colleges and universities. There is nothing wrong with community colleges, they are more affordable and are a good testing ground if you aren't sure higher ed is for you. Just know though, if you are struggling there you would have probably flunked out of a 4-year college and just because you are at 4.0 student there does not mean you will be one at a 4-year college.

One other thing - it is harder to make yourself study and do your needed work once you live on your own if the only reason you do it now is because mom and dad remind you. Independence and self motivation are some of the more important things you learn in college.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,697,018 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarqCider View Post
Let's be honest, the workload in a community college is not as stressful or as much as a four year university. I know folks who got good grades at the CC level, but dropped once they hit the four year and i wonder why is that?

is the course work at a 4 year so much more even if they are about the same length in time? i'm speaking relatively classes one could find within both places, like english/lit, history or math/psychology.
I transferred from a cc to a university. What was less was the face time in the classroom. For example, when I took Calc I, II and III at cc, my classes were 5 credits and met 5 hours a week. My peers at university took three three credit classes that met three hours a week. So I got more teaching than they did and it showed in our levels of understanding of calculus. I had a much deeper understanding of calculus than they did.

As to difficulty of classes, of course that went up. I took 100 and 200 level classes at CC and 300-400 level classes at university. I think if you looked at grades the first two years and compared them to the last two years, you'd find lots of people whose GPA went down as the difficulty of classes went up.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 07-30-2013 at 06:41 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:25 AM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 9,605,701 times
Reputation: 11672
Just curious, OP, as to your background regarding what you've written about.... Have you attended both a cc and a 4 year university or is part of your premise what you've been told by others?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:29 AM
 
2,612 posts, read 4,586,684 times
Reputation: 3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Second, if you are an above average student or better, most likely going the CC route is going to cost you MORE in the long run.

Community colleges have their place but they are not the money saver people make them out to be and they are not generally the best stepping stone for kids that really want to go to a 4 year college.
I'd love to know where you get this information. I cannot think of any logical way in which any of that could be true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,697,018 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
First thing they should know is if they plan to go to a 4 year college, research, in advance, which school you will transfer to and IF they accept CC credits.

Second, if you are an above average student or better, most likely going the CC route is going to cost you MORE in the long run.

Third, yes, the workload is going to be more in a 4 year college because they expect more and you are sitting in a room with better students all around. Even if you have the same amount of homework, the quality of that homework will be judged differently compared to your peers. If you are in a math class with a bunch of kids that are taking the class just because it's a "gen ed" vs a bunch of kids that want to become engineers...do you really thing the prof in the 4 year school is going to let much slide?

Community colleges have their place but they are not the money saver people make them out to be and they are not generally the best stepping stone for kids that really want to go to a 4 year college.
I disagree. Had I gone directly to university, my BChE would have cost $60K. Because I went to cc first, it cost 2/3 of that. My dd has chosen to go to cc first. Her first two years will cost a total of $6K instead of $48K. You'll have to explain to me how going to a school where two years of study costs less than one semester of study at university costs more in the long run. All of her courses are guaranteed to be transferrable.

BTW, I was an above average student. Because I went to cc and did well, I was given a full ride transfer scholarship to university so my cost for my education was just the CC part plus the cost of books at university. Even if I hadn't won that scholarship, I would have paid less for my first two years of college than the kids who went directly to university paid for their first semester. Going to cc can be a second chance for scholarships for students like me who did not do well in high school.

FTR there are certain universities that will not take transfer students. If you're going to one of those, yes it would be foolish to go to CC first unless you need to prove yourself to get in. However, if you are going to a school that does take transfer students, and most do, it's quite a cost save.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:54 AM
 
Location: So Ca
13,853 posts, read 13,539,572 times
Reputation: 11790
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
most likely going the CC route is going to cost you MORE in the long run. Community colleges have their place but they are not the money saver people make them out to be
Do you live in California? That's certainly the case now and has been for years since the budget cuts began. No one finishes in two years....it's more like 4, unfortunately. And the instructors aren't paid for office hours, have to teach at several CCs to make ends meet, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 07:10 AM
 
9,345 posts, read 15,780,146 times
Reputation: 17142
I attended both and graduated from both. People who don't want to do the work always find a reason not to. I had to take a few extra English classes when I transferred to the university, so one of the classes I took was "Great American Writers." Here is a conversation I heard between a boy and a girl:

Girl: Did you do your homework?

Boy: No. Did you?

Girl: No. I had a sorority meeting.

Boy: I had to go work out at the gym.

Me: Good Lord. This is a very expensive private university and these kids can't do their homework for those reasons?!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2013, 08:22 AM
 
2,612 posts, read 4,586,684 times
Reputation: 3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Do you live in California? That's certainly the case now and has been for years since the budget cuts began. No one finishes in two years....it's more like 4, unfortunately. And the instructors aren't paid for office hours, have to teach at several CCs to make ends meet, etc.
It's cheap for a reason. But I can't see what office hours and where the teachers work has to do with how long it takes a student to finish 60 credits.

But according to published data, it isn't true that "no one" finishes in 4 years. In fact, some of the cc's with best graduation and transfer rates (over 80%) are California cc's, as well as some with the worst - it's a big state. Even at my cc, with a very poor graduation rate, there is really no excuse for someone taking 4 years to finish unless they just didn't plan well (like took courses they didn't need, withdrew midsemester from classes, failed classes, or didn't take 15 credits a semester). And btw, that also happens in 4 year colleges - at a much higher price.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top