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Old 04-21-2014, 03:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That was a good list, and I will add, many people with degrees in math and various sciences get PhDs in engineering.
Of course, the question is not "can they get the degree?" but "how long does it take?" For law school, everybody takes the same time, regardless of undergraduate background. This is not the case in legitimate graduate school, perhaps with a few exceptions in the weaker disciplines.
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Old 04-21-2014, 03:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Nonetheless, she was correct.
Right from the list she cited:

"M. Arch programs are usually 3 years for students with different backgrounds and 2 years for those with the related B.Arch."

and

"The only difference is that it will take you 2 years to complete the program and only 1 year for students who have the bachelor’s in social work (B.S.W.)."

Yes, you can get in, but no, the analogy with law school admission is a non seq.

Last edited by Hamish Forbes; 04-21-2014 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 04-21-2014, 03:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
We have a friend who has both degrees and his take is that it is harder to get into law school and the actual classes are harder, however it is harder to graduate from a PhD program.
He said it is harder to get into law school than into a PhD program?

The top 10 programs in my field had acceptance rates of 5-10%. Harvard Law had an acceptance rate of 15.3% in 2013.......Explain to me how that math works out.

A quality, fully funded PhD program is harder to get into and harder to graduate. The classes may be slightly more difficult in law school, but that is also likely because they cover a larger quantity of topics and topics that the student isn't necessarily interested in/spending time learning on their own. You don't go into a PhD program if you aren't interested in the topic and spending 50-80 hours a week either studying or reading about.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mizzourah2006 View Post
You don't go into a PhD program if you aren't interested in the topic and spending 50-80 hours a week either studying or reading about.
That's for sure -- it can be a grueling experience even for people who live and breathe the field . . .
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
Directly from the source you cite: "However, even though many masterís programs accept people with unrelated bachelorís degrees, it wouldnít be smart to go into graduate-level classes blind. Which is why most grad schools require career changers to take certain prerequisite courses prior to applying."


Try it in math, physics, chemistry, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, and the like and see how far you get.
The bold does not mean a major. My daughter has a doctorate in physical therapy and like someone else's daughter upthread, she was required to take certain prereqs in undergrad. However, she could have majored in underwater basketweaving as long as she took the prereqs.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
Of course, the question is not "can they get the degree?" but "how long does it take?" For law school, everybody takes the same time, regardless of undergraduate background. This is not the case in legitimate graduate school, perhaps with a few exceptions in the weaker disciplines.
Just curious, do you consider PA school, medical school and dental school "legitimate" graduate schools? After all, everyone takes the same time regardless of undergraduate background. How about schools that award MEds, MSWs. MHRs, MBAs, MSNs, MPHs which basically work that way too? Or are those just "weaker" disciplines?

I am anxiously awaiting to hear what degrees make up the weaker disciplines.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Law schools are far more common than medical schools, so medical schools are less likely to be on other professors' radar. Currently, law professors are better paid than professors in any other discipline at most universities. The difference is not insignificant, generally at least $25-30K yearly more than the next discipline, Engineering. And what is even more galling to many PhDs is that those better paid JDs often have no research requirement attached to that salary.
You need to make a distinction between a law professor teaching in a law school versus teaching something like business law or legal environment of business at a regular (non law school) university. At the regular university, it is common for the JD's to be underpaid compared to their business counterparts.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Just curious, do you consider PA school, medical school and dental school "legitimate" graduate schools? After all, everyone takes the same time regardless of undergraduate background. How about schools that award MEds, MSWs. MHRs, MBAs, MSNs, MPHs which basically work that way too? Or are those just "weaker" disciplines?

I am anxiously awaiting to hear what degrees make up the weaker disciplines.
You are changing the subject. The original discussion was is a JD equivalent to a PhD, now you are asking if he thinks certain graduate programs are "legit" or not.

If I say a JD is not equivalent to a Phd does that mean that I think it is not legitimate in your mind?

Nice strawman.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
You need to make a distinction between a law professor teaching in a law school versus teaching something like business law or legal environment of business at a regular (non law school) university. At the regular university, it is common for the JD's to be underpaid compared to their business counterparts.
That may very well be true. I do know that when my husband and I were both adjunct professors for the same university at one duty station I made about 2/3 of what he did per class. I taught educational theory and teaching methods, he taught education law.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzourah2006 View Post
You are changing the subject. The original discussion was is a JD equivalent to a PhD, now you are asking if he thinks certain graduate programs are "legit" or not.

If I say a JD is not equivalent to a Phd does that mean that I think it is not legitimate in your mind?

Nice strawman.
Not in my mind. I was just responding to his point - it's his strawman, not mine. He doesn't think a JD should even count as a masters, but a second bachelors. You are taking issue with the wrong person on this one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
Of course, the question is not "can they get the degree?" but "how long does it take?" For law school, everybody takes the same time, regardless of undergraduate background. This is not the case in legitimate graduate school, perhaps with a few exceptions in the weaker disciplines.
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