U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-21-2015, 05:27 AM
 
297 posts, read 497,556 times
Reputation: 74

Advertisements

I'm hoping you guys can give me some advice on this. I am almost 40, and seriously considering going to college for a bachelor's degree. I have been a stay at home mom with some part time jobs for a long time. I have an old degree in Medical Office Assistance that I've been updating, but it's really not what I want to do with my life. I love helping people and studying human behavior, so am considering going back for a bachelor's in either social work, human services, or human resources (which I am guessing is a business degree, because not many schools around me offer human resource degrees). Any opinions on these fields? I would be in my mid 40's by the time I graduate, so age is an issue. Also, I am going to be paying for my dd to start college next year,m so this is serious stuff to me. I can't spend money on a degree that won't allow me to find a job or will never get me my money back. If I did the SW or HS route, I would eventually hope to move on to a bachelor's so I could do some sort of counseling (starting to consider academic advising or career counseling). Are there jobs that aren't high burnout in these fields? Any advice would be appreciated!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-21-2015, 08:36 AM
 
1,624 posts, read 4,338,549 times
Reputation: 1300
If you want to do HR, a lot of that work is clerical and doesn't require a college degree. The HR department does a lot of paper pushing to comply with a labor, tax, pension, and healthcare laws. You could start there, get experience, make connections and try to push your way up. Some employers even have tuition reimbursement programs, so they will pay for part of your college tuition, so you would be eligible to apply for mid-level, professional HR jobs after you graduate, have 4-5 years of experience (Albeit a low level, clerical one) and potentially have lots of people that know your work and would support your career inside or outside the company.

A HR degree is not necessary and most HR departments don't really exclusive recruit from those programs. HR is a generalist area anyways that touches on communications, managerial, organizational management and behavior, systems, law and accounting. I think a business administration degree is perfectly fine and a minor in accounting or IT systems would be better. But you aren't guaranteed a job upon graduation, as it really depends on the economy, the quality of the school, your grades, and your networks (i.e. people they know you enough to pass the word to other they know that you will probably be a good employee) that you develop. If you are not comfortable with the technical areas of HR, you can focus on recruiting, training, employment discrimination/EEO, the performance evaluation systems, union relations, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2015, 08:43 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 37,708,751 times
Reputation: 39059
Quote:
Originally Posted by renrenbri View Post
If I did the SW or HS route, I would eventually hope to move on to a bachelor's so I could do some sort of counseling
I personally know a handful of social workers.
Every one found zero employment opportunities with their bachelors, and every one was immediately hired upon completing their masters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2015, 11:33 AM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,299,653 times
Reputation: 5397
A degree in human services doesn't lead to a license. You'll mostly be limited to social service jobs with the government, non-profits, and public and private criminal justice facilities. You'll be competing with the many who have degrees in sociology, psychology, social work, counseling, behavioral science, criminal justice, and other related fields. Psychology and criminal justice are two of the mostly popular majors in the U.S., so there are A LOT of people to compete with.

Depending on the state, one can become licensed as a social work at the baccalaureate-level, but most of the jobs will want a master's-level license.

There are human resource undergraduate degrees, but they aren't very common. It's normal to get a business administration degree with a concentration in human resources.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2015, 12:27 PM
 
297 posts, read 497,556 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by slim04 View Post
If you want to do HR, a lot of that work is clerical and doesn't require a college degree. The HR department does a lot of paper pushing to comply with a labor, tax, pension, and healthcare laws. You could start there, get experience, make connections and try to push your way up. Some employers even have tuition reimbursement programs, so they will pay for part of your college tuition, so you would be eligible to apply for mid-level, professional HR jobs after you graduate, have 4-5 years of experience (Albeit a low level, clerical one) and potentially have lots of people that know your work and would support your career inside or outside the company.

A HR degree is not necessary and most HR departments don't really exclusive recruit from those programs. HR is a generalist area anyways that touches on communications, managerial, organizational management and behavior, systems, law and accounting. I think a business administration degree is perfectly fine and a minor in accounting or IT systems would be better. But you aren't guaranteed a job upon graduation, as it really depends on the economy, the quality of the school, your grades, and your networks (i.e. people they know you enough to pass the word to other they know that you will probably be a good employee) that you develop. If you are not comfortable with the technical areas of HR, you can focus on recruiting, training, employment discrimination/EEO, the performance evaluation systems, union relations, etc.


So are you saying it would actually be better NOT to go to school at all and just try to get my foot in as at the bottom, or do you think it would be better to get a business administration degree with a minor in accounting as opposed to a minor in human resources?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2015, 12:45 PM
 
894 posts, read 841,078 times
Reputation: 2633
Quote:
Originally Posted by renrenbri View Post
So are you saying it would actually be better NOT to go to school at all and just try to get my foot in as at the bottom, or do you think it would be better to get a business administration degree with a minor in accounting as opposed to a minor in human resources?
You're still better off going to school. Without a degree there's only so far you can advance up the ladder. It's also important to note that Human Services and Human Resources are two completely different fields. As far as doing social work, that's a profession with a huge turnover and burnout rate, not to mention many places require a Master's Degree before you can get licensed/hired.

I think what you need to do is narrow down your goals before you enroll in school and pick a major.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2015, 12:56 PM
 
297 posts, read 497,556 times
Reputation: 74
Although counseling is my dream, I also have to be realistic. Human resources seems like a better field, especially without a master's degree. Counseling is just too big of a risk for me right now. I'm just not sure if I should go for a major in human resources or if I should keep my options even more wide open by going for a major in business with a concentration in either human resources or accounting. Penn State Online offers business degrees where you can name the area you want to concentrate on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top