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Old 01-16-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: france
55 posts, read 228,609 times
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sorry to ask this question which can seem stupid,but living in france,I don't really know the difference between college and university?Is college more "manual" and less difficult,or am I totally wrong?
thank you.
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Old 01-16-2008, 10:36 AM
 
Location: McKeesport, PA
2,329 posts, read 6,856,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rachel210389 View Post
sorry to ask this question which can seem stupid,but living in france,I don't really know the difference between college and university?Is college more "manual" and less difficult,or am I totally wrong?
thank you.
In most cases, a university offers graduate level programs while a college terminates (ends) with the bachelor-level degrees. This is not always the case though, because the name of a school needs to be formally changed via it's governing board and sometimes colleges offer post-baccalaureate degrees and just never changed their name.

So unfortunately, there is no sure way to tell the difficulty of a school based solely on it's name.
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Old 01-16-2008, 10:46 AM
 
847 posts, read 3,183,062 times
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I kind of always wondered this myself too, although I have gone to two universities, it never made sense to me. I used to think that universities had different schools, school of law, school of finance, school of business, etc. However, I went to a university and it was all departments, not schools and they offered no graduate degrees.
I do not get it!!
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Old 01-16-2008, 11:16 AM
KB4
 
Location: New York, New York
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I'm sure there are exceptions, but usually a university is bigger than a college (many universities include several colleges) and offers degrees in more fields than a college. "University" and "college" also mean different things in different countries. The distinction in the US is not as clear as in some other countries. Many colleges in the US started small and decided to keep the name "college" even when they grew beyond the size and scope of a "traditional" college.
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Old 01-16-2008, 11:40 AM
 
54 posts, read 305,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rachel210389 View Post
sorry to ask this question which can seem stupid,but living in france,I don't really know the difference between college and university?Is college more "manual" and less difficult,or am I totally wrong?
thank you.
college had many parts of universities
so university part from college which contain many parts of universities like university of low --medicine--ets
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Old 01-16-2008, 12:10 PM
 
Location: france
55 posts, read 228,609 times
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thank you.it still a bit unclear,lol but I understand better.
don't know why I always thought that university was the best thing in the US and that student who hadn't got the level to go to university went to college.I thought university was more "intellectual" and college more "manual",but I really got wrong!
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Old 01-16-2008, 12:13 PM
 
847 posts, read 3,183,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KB4 View Post
I'm sure there are exceptions, but usually a university is bigger than a college (many universities include several colleges) and offers degrees in more fields than a college. "University" and "college" also mean different things in different countries. The distinction in the US is not as clear as in some other countries. Many colleges in the US started small and decided to keep the name "college" even when they grew beyond the size and scope of a "traditional" college.
Yeah, went to a university that was only 2500 people and the really only offered BA, BS and BFA. I did not really understand why it was a university. I think, in England, college is like high school and university is like college?
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Old 01-16-2008, 01:36 PM
 
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I know of many universities that are under 3000 students. It isn't the size of the school that determines if it is a university or not. The technical definition is that they offer graduate or doctoral level degrees. I am sure that there are some schools that have not changed their names but it would be in their best interest to do so. We had that happen in MN about 15 years ago or so with one of our colleges opening up a business school thus becoming a university and they changed their name from the College of St. Thomas to the University of St. Thomas.
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Old 01-16-2008, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Camberville
11,404 posts, read 16,026,836 times
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The whole college-university deal really means little. But yes, generally a university is defined as having upper level degrees. Many have different "schools" under the main university heading, which sometimes go by colleges. For instance, Harvard is Harvard University. However, the undergrad portion is Harvard College. Other schools sometimes refer to the undergrad school as the School/College of Arts and Science. However Dartmouth is still Dartmouth College despite having an engineering, medical, and business school as well.

College/university distinctions really have little meaning in terms of difficulty of college, prestige, etc. Those are things you have to research on your own.
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Old 01-16-2008, 03:59 PM
 
3,536 posts, read 6,966,120 times
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We do have something here called "Junior College" or "Community College" which generally offers trade programs along with a two year degree called an Associates Degree. They also offer a lot of the lower level classes that are offered at colleges and universities.

Some students who don't have the grades or the scores high enough to get into college will take classes at the Junior College and then transfer later when they can prove to the college that they can cut it.

It is also much less expensive at Junior College, so students will take their general courses there and then transfer later to finish their degree.

Most Junior Colleges are local, commuter colleges and do not offer residential halls.
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