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Old 06-30-2017, 08:49 AM
 
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Is she getting professional help so she can manage her anxiety issues? If not, that should be at the top of your list of things to do. Whatever colleges you narrow your search down to, speak with their disability services office to see what type of support they have for your daughter. I also suggest an occasional anxiety check-up at the health/counseling center.
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Old 07-02-2017, 11:02 PM
Status: "In the battle between good and evil, I know where I stand." (set 24 days ago)
 
7,023 posts, read 3,537,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax2PVB View Post
Okay so i just found this forum and was happy that I could ask this openly, but here is the deal.....I am looking for KNOWLEDGE or personal experience, not people saying "maybe she shouldn't go to college" or "Start with community college" etc - we are looking at schools for our daughter. She has time (HS junior this coming year) but she also is not in the highest ranks of her class. She is diligent, dedicated, an athlete and a great kid (not bc she is mine, she just is a pretty cool chick! )

She doesn't cut class or party, etc - she just has a 3.0 with her greatest effort. She is smart but her testing has revealed a Working Memory Index Delay, meaning that she has a hard time retaining/recalling information that moves fast and piles on, so she has a 504 and gets extra test time, copies of the teacher's notes for studying and before/after school help from teachers when needed. Her classwork and homework are straight As but her tests are almost always Cs and Ds due to the memory situation and the anxiety it causes. She is a really smart kid, but test taking really tanks her grades - she gets so worked up about her disability that she actually gets headaches and has even thrown up before midterms and finals - it is bad.
Your daughter sounds great -- she's hard working and hasn't let her learning differences hold her back.

Do NOT sell her short.

My advice -- as a retired college counselor who worked with many kids with 504s - is this: draw up a list of colleges that she likes and where her GPA is aligned with the "average" GPA of the school. Then, contact the Disabilities Services Office of each school and arrange a meeting (in person best, phone OK) to discuss their support programs for students like your daughter. Keep in mind that when students reach college, the responsibility for requesting accommodations rests on the student's shoulders, not the parents. So, your daughter should be involved with these meetings.

Some schools make it easier than others to get proper accommodations, and some schools have excellent support for kids with learning disabilities.

Would Florida work? If so, look at Lynn University, which has excellent support programs for kids with learning differences.

But, here are a few more colleges (there are more!) that your daughter might like, have a decent shot at being admitted to, and which have good support programs:

Eckerd College (FL)
Stetson College (FL)
Elon University (NC)
Catawba College (NC)
Guilford College (NC)
Lenoir Rhyne College (NC)
Wingate University (NC)
College of Charleston (SC)
Furman University (SC)
Wofford College (SC)
Agnes Scott (GA)
Hollins College (VA)
Roanoke College (VA)
Lynchburg College (VA)

But, this is just a starter list. I'd also take a look at your in-state public universities. It is highly likely that she is eligible for admission to at least some of them with her solid GPA.

To repeat: don't sell your daughter short. Her GPA is fine. She is obviously a determined young lady. Your goal is to find her a college that recognizes this AND that will set her up for success. To do that, you need to talk to the disabilities services offices, with your daughter present, about what she needs to succeed.

And, she WILL succeed.

Best wishes to her!
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Old 07-02-2017, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'The Waterfall City'
6,040 posts, read 3,001,281 times
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Look at University of North Georgia, and Winthrop University in Rock Hill SC, south of Charlotte. Both of these are public.
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Old 07-02-2017, 11:51 PM
 
Location: USA
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Try to encourage her to major in a field that has a high ROI, (computer science, engineering, accounting, etc.) Computer science grads often get offers before graduation for good salaries (70k+) Liberal arts generally does not pay. It's not worth taking on all that time and money to get stuck working in retail, which does not pay a wage worth going to college for. I have friends that became close to suicidal trying to pay back student loans on a $8 an hour post college retail job.

Last edited by s1alker; 07-03-2017 at 12:00 AM..
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Old 07-03-2017, 12:19 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,222 posts, read 36,627,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vladlensky View Post
Jax2PVB,

I know you wanted to avoid people just saying 'Go to community college', but from personal experience I have found that community college can be a great way to experience the college environment and figure out your areas of interest prior to committing to a full 4 year degree program and all that it entails. ...
In my own experience, community college was a great transition from being a homeschool student to ...The nice part was once I was ready to transition to a 4 year program, many of the relevant credits were accepted as transfer credits by the University.

So, in short, give the community college a chance if you have good ones available near you, it can be a great fit for many students.
Jr College can be a great option, with a LOT better 1:1/ tutoring / special needs help. Glad my kids could do Full Time Jr College INSTEAD of wasting away in High school. (One had a test anxiety / learning issue). They all graduated 4yr with gold ropes, and JR College was a huge part of that!! (great training / profs / programs... 100% of credits transferred to their majors and they started the U as full Juniors, pre age 18.
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Try to encourage her to major in a field that has a high ROI, (computer science, engineering, accounting, etc.) Computer science grads often get offers before graduation for good salaries (70k+) Liberal arts generally does not pay. It's not worth taking on all that time and money to get stuck working in retail, which does not pay a wage worth going to college for. I have friends that became close to suicidal trying to pay back student loans on a $8 an hour post college retail job.
Yes... college education is a major 'strategy' expense / time sink ...not to be squandered.

Many countries (Not USA) consider that and direct students and learning programs to 'value added' careers for economy and country strength. Not in USA The more the upper EDU confuses and retains confused students, the more tuition they rob and the less the professors need to know to be 'relevant'. I just completed another Masters Program (Post age 50). Sad state of students and profs. (and VERY greedy admissions!)

I HOPE your experience is better, thus DIG for the facts / experiences of the alumni and current students.
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra
83 posts, read 42,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwerty View Post
One thing to consider with distance from home, depending on your budget and finances, but with the 7 hour drive option, often being farther away and flying home can take less time. We found that the 4-7 hour distance was the hardest because you really couldn't do a day trip at that distance so being able to drive was moot at that point. Now your proximity to an airport as well as the campus proximity would factor into that as well.

I would agree that looking at smaller schools, either private or public, would be better as she would be able to get more personal attention. There are several schools that have pretty extensive programs for students with learning disabilities. I'm not overly familiar with schools in the Southeast but Lynn and Beacon show up on lists when I do a search. Another school that popped up is College of Charleston. Outside of your area, Westminster College, Fulton, MO popped up. What got my attention was that over 10% of their student population has a documented learning disability followed by the $20,000 cost, which is really reasonable.
I went to the College or Charleston - not keen on it for my daughter for many reasons, but I am shocked at how competitive it is compared to 25 years ago! ;-)
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra
83 posts, read 42,206 times
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Thanks. She is great! It is so daunting when you see "average GPA for incoming freshman is 3.8" - she was feeling despair for a while. It was killing me! She has been off to a great start this year in 11th grade and the search continues. She wants to consider schools all over the east coast now to broaden our search and she found James Madison which she got very excited about -
Thanks for the kind words - I know she will succeed. :-)
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,993 posts, read 5,074,895 times
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"Hi, Mike Rowe here."
No, not really, but sitting way far at the other end of the non-careers of my kids, and those of other friends whose kids still struggle in life with no useful skills, I have to put in a pitch for the trades. Have you ever heard people question why do they have to learn <boring subject here> since I'll never use that in life? Well they are right! I think we need about half the people trying to get into college to redirect their life to a more productive direction for themselves. Learn a trade.
After college people have 30,000-60,000 debt and no real prospect for a job to pay that off.
An apprentice electrician or plumber can be seeing a starting salary of $60,000 a year!
Even construction trades can start earning serious money right out of high school without the big investments in knowledge you'll never use in real life.
Think about it.
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Old 10-09-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,847 posts, read 4,985,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax2PVB View Post
Looking at major options of Business/Marketing, Hospitality Management, Journalism and maybe possibly Exercise Science or Kinesiology (her last choice).
picking the right major will be important. try to find how courses in these majors operate and whether they play to her strengths.

good Luck to her!

and do not bother with the rankings. They are silly and distracting and very misleading.

S.
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:30 AM
Status: "In the battle between good and evil, I know where I stand." (set 24 days ago)
 
7,023 posts, read 3,537,525 times
Reputation: 8238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax2PVB View Post
Thanks. She is great! It is so daunting when you see "average GPA for incoming freshman is 3.8" - she was feeling despair for a while. It was killing me! She has been off to a great start this year in 11th grade and the search continues. She wants to consider schools all over the east coast now to broaden our search and she found James Madison which she got very excited about -
Thanks for the kind words - I know she will succeed. :-)
Again, don't sell her short. The only sure way not to get into a college is to never apply.

I wanted to add one more school to the list I gave earlier -- the University of Arizona. They have a center totally devoted to helping kids with LDs succeed called the Salt Center. It requires an additional application, but it's a fabulous program that really helps kids succeed.

But, again, I'd start by developing a list of schools where your daughter's GPA comes close. Visit and talk to the Disabilities Support Offices at each school during your visit (your daughter needs to be in on those appointments).

There are plenty of colleges that will happily accept "B" students who show a strong interest in attending. In fact, most colleges these days need YOU more than you need them. A recent survey of several thousand admissions directors at both public and private colleges showed that last year only 35% met their enrollment targets for freshmen. Most colleges accept more students than they reject. So, while I wouldn't recommend that a B student with an LD apply to highly competitive universities (i.e., the Ivy League schools, Stanford, etc.), there are plenty of great choices that will be a good match.

Regarding community colleges, that can be a good option but it really depends on the community college. Some are great at helping students who need a little support, but others (just like 4 year schools) are not. Hood questions to ask community colleges is: What percentage of your students who enter planning to transfer to a 4 year college do so? And, of those who do, what percentage do so within two years? Some community colleges also track how their transfer students fare after they transfer -- in other words, do they eventually get their 4 year degree.
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