U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-09-2017, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,245 posts, read 3,406,033 times
Reputation: 8787

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
What I wonder, is this: if college costs keep rising, will the number of people applying to colleges drop?
When middle class jobs don't require it.

There are indeed plumbing jobs and the like out there that pay middle class salaries and can be had with licensure or a 2 year degree only, but let's be honest there are not millions of those jobs out there. The BLS says we will need 50k more plumbers in 2024 than we have now. https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction...eamfitters.htm

Let's assume theres a construction boom & it turns out to be 150 or 200k. There are 17 million college students; there's still a big remainder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-10-2017, 11:57 AM
 
2,286 posts, read 1,403,166 times
Reputation: 1142
I recommend trying to minimize debt, but only to a point. I think the best option for most people is to go to the best in-state school they can get into. If you get into Harvard or Stanford and have to pay a huge amount, it's a decision to make, and likely depends on many things, such as your major and future plans.

Point of reference: I went to an average state school on a full ride and my first job was at a company that's probably more selective than Harvard. There were things I didn't like about school, but I dealt with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2017, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,245 posts, read 3,406,033 times
Reputation: 8787
Quote:
Originally Posted by rarog View Post
I recommend trying to minimize debt, but only to a point. I think the best option for most people is to go to the best in-state school they can get into. If you get into Harvard or Stanford and have to pay a huge amount, it's a decision to make, and likely depends on many things, such as your major and future plans.

Point of reference: I went to an average state school on a full ride and my first job was at a company that's probably more selective than Harvard. There were things I didn't like about school, but I dealt with them.
I'd agree with this, even regardless of major. If you go to Stanford and major in a liberal art, you will be among the elite liberal art graduates out there. Want to work for an art museum & majored in art? A Stanford degree will help get you into the good big city museums instead of Podunk Mississippi.

I'd include the top 15 schools on the US News ranking in that decision matrix.

Beyond that, try to get best bang for the buck. My strategy was to go to the best school I got accepted to that offered the best aid package with most grants/scholarships and fewest loans. This meant I did not go to the best or most enticing school which sent me an acceptance letter. For some people who didn't do well in high school this might mean community college but that's okay.

It worked out pretty well for me; I landed the job I wanted although not precisely the location I wanted.

I had some debt but it was manageable. Less than typical car debt today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2017, 09:24 AM
 
2,286 posts, read 1,403,166 times
Reputation: 1142
But what kind of money do people make working at a museum? If they're making $40k, taking on 6 figures worth of debt just isn't worth it. Which is why I say it depends on major and career choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2017, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,245 posts, read 3,406,033 times
Reputation: 8787
In
Quote:
Originally Posted by rarog View Post
But what kind of money do people make working at a museum? If they're making $40k, taking on 6 figures worth of debt just isn't worth it. Which is why I say it depends on major and career choice.
There are about 300 undergraduate majors offered by universities around the country and the vast majority result in starting salaries between 40k and 65k. The top 10% of majors make more, but by definition the top tenth can't be 100%.

That's a problem everyone faces.

There was a study done in 2012, I don't have the link on me right now, that showed only 39% of undergraduates take out any debt whatsoever... financial aid covers the bills for 61% of them. The 39% are probably weighed toward out of state, private university students, and families that unfortunately fall into that situation where they make too much for grants but not enough to easily cover the bills.

The real debt crisis involves graduate degrees. THAT'S where the 6 figure numbers come in.

Last edited by redguard57; 09-12-2017 at 10:59 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2017, 09:24 AM
 
2,286 posts, read 1,403,166 times
Reputation: 1142
That's not really a satisfying answer. I wouldn't even want to take on 5 figures of debt if I weren't going to graduate with a job better than $40k. Going to an elite private school might mean a huge amount of debt.

I disagree that the debt crisis isn't real in undergrad. Schools keep increasing tuition, and kids are graduating without real skills and having a very tough time finding jobs. You shouldn't go to grad school if you have to pay for it. I'm guessing you mostly mean law/med/business school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,245 posts, read 3,406,033 times
Reputation: 8787
Quote:
Originally Posted by rarog View Post
That's not really a satisfying answer. I wouldn't even want to take on 5 figures of debt if I weren't going to graduate with a job better than $40k. Going to an elite private school might mean a huge amount of debt.

I disagree that the debt crisis isn't real in undergrad. Schools keep increasing tuition, and kids are graduating without real skills and having a very tough time finding jobs. You shouldn't go to grad school if you have to pay for it. I'm guessing you mostly mean law/med/business school.
40% of all undergraduates are at community colleges, where the average tuition is $3500/yr.

Another significant percentage are at state universities where tuition averages about $9000/yr.

A little less than 40% of undergraduates receive Pell grants which total up to $5500 per year. In that scenario your community college is paid and you're only on the hook for about 4k a year over two (maybe three) years of university. Another 30% get some other kind of financial assistance. Of course there are some other costs. Living, books, etc..

That's why only 40% of undergraduates take out loans.

I would prefer that public college be free at point of service, a much more rational way to handle it. But that's not the country we live in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2017, 07:01 PM
 
6,965 posts, read 10,853,538 times
Reputation: 7455
Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
Schools are getting more and more expensive, but it is worth the extra tag. Are elite schools in specific really worth the high costs?
Unless my kid wanted to be an investment banker, corporate lawyer, or university professor ... I wouldn't spend a dime to send them to an expensive school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2017, 08:49 AM
 
46 posts, read 18,127 times
Reputation: 81
Do the math to find out.


My son had a free ride to University of Central Florida engineering program but we decided to spend about 60K for Texas A&M.


The starting salaries don't warrant the difference however the Alumni hook ups and ease of finding a job probably make this about dead even.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2017, 06:36 PM
 
3,979 posts, read 1,608,189 times
Reputation: 12455
Are you going to an elite school to learn arbitrage? Then it's worth it. Are you going to an elite school to become a social worker? Then you're out of your mind.

Likewise, are your parents farting $100 bills? Then go wherever they feel comfortable paying. But if you're having to pony up your own money, then no.

The biggest problem? Universities have utterly failed to control their costs. In the past seventeen years, the ratio of administrators per 100 students has risen something like 65%.

Heck, my wife and I constitute the top 5% for combined household income. But even we were loath to send our kids to private school. My daughter wanted to go to Tulane, with a tuition of more than $50,000. That's the equivalent of a BMW for four years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top