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Old 09-01-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
3,688 posts, read 3,613,791 times
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I've been reviewing hundreds of resumes lately for mid-level positions ($40-50K/yr) in museum, curator, tour guide type positions and maybe about 1/3rd of them had History degrees (bachelors, masters and some with multiple grad degrees).

All too many of the applicants were well into middle-age and had very modest and erratic work experience. The best of them had been school teachers. Maybe the degree nurtures a passion in the person which is good, but for success and income? just no, a very weak group overall.

Wouldn't recommend it any more than a Liberal Arts degree.

 
Old 09-01-2017, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 9,720,992 times
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I think it just shows what students will do to avoid math and math-intensive classes.
 
Old 09-01-2017, 05:45 PM
 
6,717 posts, read 9,474,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
I find it somewhat hard to believe, namely because recent linkedin searches, indeed searches rarely have job postings "History degree strongly, preferred, required" etc... It usually some type of technical degree and or years of experience in X. Yes you gain valuable writing and research skills but I'd say that's not something strictly confined to majoring in history alone.

That being said, if it is true, if the History degree is starting to be seen as more employable, as not worthless-then that is a wonderful thing. If we can hit a point where the LA degrees are not largely seen as unemployable and a "waste of time" then that is awesome.
Your reference to job openings in history is true, but that doesn't apply to all liberal arts degrees. Of course, I know some here don't think that a STEM degree can be a liberal art, but the sciences are. I regularly do searches for jobs that want a psychology or biology degree because I have a background in both. There are actually way more openings in psychology in my area. I receive the Indeed alerts weekly.

If you search psychology on Indeed, you'll see tens of thousands of openings across the country, and most do not require a PhD or PsyD. Biology, on the other hand, has about 15,000 fewer openings listed nationwide. Obviously, this shouldn't be used to gauge your chances of getting a job. There are more psychology graduates than biology graduates, but biology is not exactly an unpopular degree program.

Speaking of LinkedIn, that's not really the best place to search for a lot of jobs. I've worked in the social services and criminal justice fields for years. I find hundreds of jobs openings every year by going to government or non-profit websites or by the Indeed alerts I set up. LinkedIn doesn't even list half of these jobs.
 
Old 09-01-2017, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,146 posts, read 23,601,705 times
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There is strategy behind this move. If you are good at reading and writing and usually do well in history, it can be an easy major full of excellent grades that were for you, pretty effortless. THEN you take that 4.0 GPA and get into medical or law school. It's much easier for most people to score 4.0's in history than chemistry or physics.
 
Old 09-01-2017, 06:08 PM
 
6,717 posts, read 9,474,772 times
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Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
There is strategy behind this move. If you are good at reading and writing and usually do well in history, it can be an easy major full of excellent grades that were for you, pretty effortless. THEN you take that 4.0 GPA and get into medical or law school. It's much easier for most people to score 4.0's in history than chemistry or physics.
Humanities majors have a higher acceptance rate in to medical school than biology majors do, but I don't think it's because of GPA. Medical schools like diversity in education background. Since most medical school applicants are biology majors, applying with a biology degree decreases your chance of being accepted. Also, humanities majors, on average, have higher MCAT scores. According to this article from 2010, English majors had a higher composite MCAT score than chemistry majors did.

https://medschoolodyssey.wordpress.c...raduate-major/

Say what you want about these majors being easy, but a lot of the students are not stupid or math-phobic. If they're applying to medical school or some other graduate healthcare program, they still have to take the science and math prerequisites and get high enough grades in them to be competitive.

Here are some more recent articles on MCAT scores and acceptance rates if anyone is interested.

https://magoosh.com/mcat/major-and-mcat-score/
http://www.savvypremed.com/savvy-pre...medical-school
 
Old 09-01-2017, 07:23 PM
 
5,387 posts, read 4,918,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
Thing is, you don't have to be a history major to learn enough of history to gain from its lesson. A history major is going to want to know all the little details, where someone with another one might be fine with a 'general' history class. It would be about the larger swaths of history as it relates and there would be enough detail to allow them to become interested in how it all works together. And if they want more, that would be available. You don't need to know every last bit of information about the Civil War to learn about how it changed the American society, for instance. But it is important to know those things. It is part and parcial of the way the modern American world works, or doesn't. The history major will go for every battle and law and idea but the general student will still have a sense of what it was and how it left a breat cliff and deep river between the two societies which exists today. It would greatly help in anyone who is ignorant of it's power because you need to know how it got there. And if you do know, then you can start changing it.

History if taught well is the story of human beings and this is why the best of the best in tv or movies is based on their own experiences, and how they lived and believed. One thing which is too often whitewashed away are those non pc items like how the Founders of our country mostly owned slaves. But its also an opportunity to teach how to go beyond the way(s) we feel now by not looking at them, but the people who were there then. And how much or little it fits.

History can also be a fascinating story of real people and taught that way with all the background shown in defining the world they live in.

In fifty years, most of those students will be shaking their head over the world they find themselves in and perhaps understand that over time events and people and acceptable thought ALWAYS transends into something else.

Maybe the fashion people should learn about how people dressed, and why and how it defined them within society, and how and when it changed. And throw in the actual history while studying the clothes they wore.

Maybe med students should learn the history of their hopefully acquired craft and the tools they used way back when and also define the world around them. The thing which is important is to actually see and understand some element of the world which we might find utterly foreign today.

Maybe for those with no exact match, a period reinactment?

Just like we learn the use of our language in every class and much of the daily life, not just English class, when you plant the seed the rest will have somewhere to grow from.

History majors don't really learn "the facts", they learn that history changes based on who is writing the story. Then they learn how to dig behind different accounts of the past to be able to look at history from multiple perspectives, think critically about the different takes, and emerge able to write their own credible account of moments in history.

Also, most disciplines... fashion, health, etc.... actually have a required class or two that touch on the history of that field. Especially at the graduate level. So it happens!

I think history is a nice mix of disciplines.. you have to be a bit of an anthropologist, sociologist, economist, psychologist, etc. in order to put it all together. It's pretty cool.
 
Old 09-02-2017, 12:21 AM
Status: "If it ain't Boeing I ain't going" (set 20 hours ago)
 
Location: Nevada side of Lake Tahoe
4,657 posts, read 2,783,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timppa View Post
Instead, here in USA, they are end result trade schools for the most part. If one wishes to study nursing, business or computers, they should attend schools designed for just that.
If you want to get a job in nursing, business or computer, companies in those fields are wanting at least a bachelor's degree as a bare minimum. Just getting a certificate at a trade school won't count.
 
Old 09-02-2017, 04:05 PM
 
627 posts, read 216,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I'm a real fan of history majors. That shift in my thinking came years ago when I read an article by James Michener. Students with enough latitude and enough adaptability do very well with their history degrees. Others - those who are prone to think vertically - are better off with engineering types of degrees.

I worked for several history majors during my career in sales and marketing. Actually, the very worst people in my field were those with marketing degrees....
What makes you say that?

I did interview for a marketing position once, the boss was really impressed by what we did in class. I get the feeling that people think that we memorize dates and thats it..its way more than that.
 
Old 09-03-2017, 08:18 AM
 
88 posts, read 27,233 times
Reputation: 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
If you want to get a job in nursing, business or computer, companies in those fields are wanting at least a bachelor's degree as a bare minimum. Just getting a certificate at a trade school won't count.
.
I know. I meant it more in a hypothetical sense, comparing our system to that of some countries in Europe where high school already places one at the level of a US College freshman or sophomore. They also have schools for all of those fields, without college. I can't speak for all countries, nor am I saying they have a better system.
 
Old 09-03-2017, 03:17 PM
 
5,017 posts, read 2,193,712 times
Reputation: 4818
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
There is strategy behind this move. If you are good at reading and writing and usually do well in history, it can be an easy major full of excellent grades that were for you, pretty effortless. THEN you take that 4.0 GPA and get into medical or law school. It's much easier for most people to score 4.0's in history than chemistry or physics.
How many history majors are getting into medical school without significant additional coursework in the sciences (with correspondingly high grades)?
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