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Old 09-03-2017, 05:19 PM
 
291 posts, read 128,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerGeek40 View Post
Not sure what you can do with a history major -- perhaps pump gas.
I must have missed where you listed your college degree and yearly income.

 
Old 09-04-2017, 06:29 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 1,949,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
How many history majors are getting into medical school without significant additional coursework in the sciences (with correspondingly high grades)?
I would assume that the history majors and any other LA majors who want to go med school would still be completing the pre-reqs, chem, organic chem, physics, bio etc... and getting good marks in them. I don't think the LA major is allowed to skip the hard sciences required for Med school.

However I am assuming the LA major who did good in all the hard sciences looks more "interesting" than the bio major who did good in all the hard sciences when both are applying for med school.
 
Old 09-04-2017, 07:58 PM
 
6,755 posts, read 9,670,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
I would assume that the history majors and any other LA majors who want to go med school would still be completing the pre-reqs, chem, organic chem, physics, bio etc... and getting good marks in them. I don't think the LA major is allowed to skip the hard sciences required for Med school.

However I am assuming the LA major who did good in all the hard sciences looks more "interesting" than the bio major who did good in all the hard sciences when both are applying for med school.
No one is allowed to skip the prerequisites. They are always required for everyone. Biology majors (and possibly chemistry) may automatically complete the prerequisites while completing their degrees, for the most part, but other STEM majors may not. Physics, engineering, mathematics, and technology majors may have to take prerequisite courses that are in addition to what's required for their degrees. But, once again, physics, mathematics, biology, and chemistry ARE liberal arts majors.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,399 posts, read 16,564,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
If you want to get a job in nursing, business or computer, companies in those fields are wanting at least a bachelor's degree as a bare minimum. Just getting a certificate at a trade school won't count.
This was back in the 80's, but I doubt the thinking of people who decide who to hire has changed that much. I got hired as a programmer trainee at a bank. I had no experience in banking, and just a certificate in programming. But I did have an AA in history, with a high grade point average.

I didn't just get hired since I had good references with my Certificate. I got the job since I'd worked hard to get that AA, and got good grades. That means I stuck to it. That means I went beyond the text book and read up on events and places which especially interested me, and could write a good essay exploring a historical event or person using beyond the assigned books. It meant that I had good grades in English too, so I knew how to communicate ideas well. It meant that if given a task, I knew how to come at it from all directions and if I needed to research to complete it, I would.

The humanities teach you to diversify, to not just look at the question or task, but all the elements which go in it too. It teaches one how to be creative. It teaches one to see multiple solutions and evaluate them to find the best. It introduces you to a way of thinking which is not black and white, where there are shades of grey which translates into many things including writing programs, since how you do it is in a big part determined by looking at all the things needed and how best to impliment them with room to easily modify the running system when its needs change.

Too often, those who's only discipline is in an exacting science do not have that flexability. If you need someone to write or fix something with well defined paramaters, they do great. If you want something which can bend and turn as needs do, their best vision is going to be larger and still with limits. Its people who see possibilities where there weren't who have redefined our world, and they could not have if they were not blessed by the creativity which having a diverse education brings.

Once tech was the futuristic flash we saw in movies, but mostly it wasn't real. People who could see ways to make it real have made our world, and are still redefining it daily, and we NEED to make sure that those to whom the 'magic' many older citizens see is a successful challenge conqured and inspires them more.

And society is better off in general when more of its citizens have learned to transcend their early programming and see a much more rich and diverse world as it changes and the challenges are new.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 05:20 PM
 
4,012 posts, read 2,640,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doomFIST View Post
My wife was a history major, foreign language minor and got a 32/33 (don't quite remember) on the MCAT. It definitely set her apart from the rest of the bio/chem applicants when she was applying to med school, but it wasn't enough to get her into a top 20 program, but got 3 acceptances for top 50 programs.
How does that joke go, "What do you call someone who finished last in their class in medical school, from a very low ranking school? Doctor!" All kidding aside, getting into a good(top) medical school is great, but not the end of the world if you don't.

I used to work at Duke University Medical Center doing researching and since Duke is a major teaching/resident hospital I decided to go online to see which medical schools the residents graduated from, and I was surprised two of the residents (I forget which department/specialty/sub-specialty) got their MD from two of the for-profit medical schools in the Caribbean, and thought they must have finished near the top of their class and been in the 99% with their Step 1 licensing score to get a residency at Duke.

To sort of tie this back into the topic, I had an honors student, who was doing their honors thesis research in my lab at the University of Arizona and he was a linguistics major and got accepted into medical school no problem (of course he took all of the pre-reqs he needed).

Last edited by cjseliga; 09-05-2017 at 06:25 PM..
 
Old 09-05-2017, 06:17 PM
 
5,550 posts, read 5,055,423 times
Reputation: 10045
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
How does that joke go, "What do you call someone who finished last in their last class in medical school, from a very low ranking school? Doctor!" All kidding aside, getting into a good(top) medical school is great, but not the end of the world if you don't.

I used to work at Duke University Medical Center doing researching and since Duke is a major teaching/resident hospital I decided to go online to see which medical schools the residents graduated from, and I was surprised two of the residents (I forget which department/specialty/sub-specialty) got their MD from two of the for-profit medical schools in the Caribbean, and thought they must have finished near the top of their class and been in the 99% with their Step 1 licensing score to get a residency at Duke.

To sort of tie this back into the topic, I had an honors student, who was doing their honors thesis research in my lab at the University of Arizona and he was a linguistics major and got accepted into medical school no problem (of course he took all of the pre-reqs he needed).
Yeah, when I was advising premeds one of the things we used to tell them was they had 2 shots at "prestige", if that was their goal... acceptance into an elite med school OR a prestigious residency later on (there were even fellowships after residency that are considered elite). The AAMC holds all the med schools to a somewhat standardized curriculum so being top of the class means you've mastered the same material no matter where you go to med school.

But beyond that, a doctor is a doctor and they'll work no matter what. Those loans *will* be repaid lol.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
6,076 posts, read 2,192,772 times
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Does it matter whether or not a major is popular right now? I don't understand what the point is.


History is not a wise choice regardless of how popular it is to study.


For students who attend Yale, it might not matter so much. If they come from wealthy backgrounds, they're going to have a bright future no matter what they study.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Texas
6,076 posts, read 2,192,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timppa View Post
One can attain a level of enlightenment with a History degree. This is what Universities should be about. Instead, here in USA, they are end result trade schools for the most part. If one wishes to study nursing, business or computers, they should attend schools designed for just that. Universities should be for studying arts and letters, humanities and social sciences.
Sure, you can be very enlightened and also unemployed.


Universities traditionally were for studying arts and humanities. They were like finishing schools for rich kids, who didn't need to learn a trade. However, as more and more people started attending college, it became a problem that middle class & poor kids were studying liberal arts. They didn't have a wealthy family to fall back on or a guaranteed spot in a family business after graduating.


I don't think History is a smart college major.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 06:52 PM
 
1,857 posts, read 623,356 times
Reputation: 2541
Quote:
Originally Posted by timppa View Post
One can attain a level of enlightenment with a History degree. This is what Universities should be about. Instead, here in USA, they are end result trade schools for the most part. If one wishes to study nursing, business or computers, they should attend schools designed for just that. Universities should be for studying arts and letters, humanities and social sciences.
Nonsense. An education that doesn't prepare one for a career is a luxury. If you can afford to spend $100K+ on something that doesn't provide any economic benefit, great. But don't fool yourself - such a decision is just as self indulgent as buying an expensive sports car - except you can at least sell the car for something.

Characterizing education for the sake of education as some sort of noble pursuit is the height of arrogance. Go ahead and major in history or whatever else you want to - but don't whine when you're middle-aged, still saddled with student loans, and make $50K per year. I have friends and family in this situation and they're uniformly bitter that some of us choose educations that allowed us to have a career that allowed us to pursue luxury pursuits (like degrees in history) later in life. They genuinely believe they've been treated unfairly because they earn a fraction of what some of us do and have dead-end, unfulfilling jobs. They bought the "education for the sake of education" tripe hook, line, and sinker, but simply can't admit they made a decision that ended precisely where any rational person could have predicted.
 
Old 09-05-2017, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Texas
6,076 posts, read 2,192,772 times
Reputation: 12808
Quote:
Originally Posted by YourWakeUpCall View Post
Nonsense. An education that doesn't prepare one for a career is a luxury. If you can afford to spend $100K+ on something that doesn't provide any economic benefit, great. But don't fool yourself - such a decision is just as self indulgent as buying an expensive sports car - except you can at least sell the car for something..
True. A liberal arts degrees (most of them) are expensive luxuries that don't prepare people for careers. They are a relic from a bygone era, when only rich kids went to college to study humanities, arts, etc.


This is what people don't understand.


And colleges need to change with the times. I think more colleges should offer vocational programs as a 2 or 4 year degree. That way, a student can learn a useful trade and still get a degree at the same time.
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