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Old 09-05-2017, 10:48 PM
 
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Spending $100k+ for a bachelor's degree is exceptionally rare. If you spent $100k+ on any bachelor's degree, then you aren't very bright.

 
Old 09-06-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: WI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Spending $100k+ for a bachelor's degree is exceptionally rare. If you spent $100k+ on any bachelor's degree, then you aren't very bright.
Only 50% of Yale students are on financial aid, meaning the other 50% are paying well above $100K for their bachelor's degree. (More like $250K). In what world is that "exceptionally rare"?
 
Old 09-06-2017, 08:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YourWakeUpCall View Post
Nonsense. An education that doesn't prepare one for a career is a luxury. If you can afford to spend $100K+ on something that doesn't provide any economic benefit, great. But don't fool yourself - such a decision is just as self indulgent as buying an expensive sports car - except you can at least sell the car for something.

Characterizing education for the sake of education as some sort of noble puincurring the height of arrogance. Go ahead and major in history or whatever else you want to - but don't whine when you're middle-aged, still saddled with student loans, and make $50K per year. I have friends and family in this situation and they're uniformly bitter that some of us choose educations that allowed us to have a career that allowed us to pursue luxury pursuits (like degrees in history) later in life. They genuinely believe they've been treated unfairly because they earn a fraction of what some of us do and have dead-end, unfulfilling jobs. They bought the "education for the sake of education" tripe hook, line, and sinker, but simply can't admit they made a decision that ended precisely where any rational person could have predicted.
It may be nonsense to you, and to others who believe higher education is a means to a certain lifestyle. Not all people are interested in nice cars, 55 inch flat screen TVs, huge McMansions in the suburbs, etc., not that there's anything wrong with that. It all depends on one's values, and keep in mind that not everyone will become a doctor, lawyer, engineer, or financial services specialist. Furthermore, I never said anything about incuring 100K student loan debt, which is another difference between us and the Europeans. I attended public universities.
 
Old 09-06-2017, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Sure, but I still don't think a history degree is a wise choice. Even for a liberal arts degree, it's the worst of the worst.
 
Old 09-06-2017, 10:44 PM
 
Location: WI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Sure, but I still don't think a history degree is a wise choice. Even for a liberal arts degree, it's the worst of the worst.
What a silly post.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 02:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strawflower View Post
Only 50% of Yale students are on financial aid, meaning the other 50% are paying well above $100K for their bachelor's degree. (More like $250K). In what world is that "exceptionally rare"?
In general, it is exceptionally rare. The people I was responding to were making sweeping statements that liberal arts degrees are expensive luxuries that cost $100k+.

Concerning Yale, specifically, I'm not sure your figures are accurate. 50% of Yale students receive need-based aid from Yale. 64% receive assistance from Yale or another source. 84% of Yale students graduate with no debt. Among the 16% of students who graduated with debt in 2014, the average debt was less than $15,000. If there were any students paying $250k, they paid out of pocket. I don't think we need to worry about them.

https://news.yale.edu/2015/02/27/faq...g-yale-college
https://admissions.yale.edu/financia...ctive-students
 
Old 09-07-2017, 06:28 AM
 
Location: So Ca
13,335 posts, read 13,130,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
True. A liberal arts degrees (most of them) are expensive luxuries that don't prepare people for careers. They are a relic from a bygone era, when only rich kids went to college to study humanities, arts, etc.

This is what people don't understand.
I think they do; they probably just want to major in a subject that they like.

And not everyone remains working in the field in which they majored. I know few who do by the time they're in their 50s. Of the three history majors in our extended family, only one ended up working in that field, teaching the subject. The other ended up running his own company and the other in city planning.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 01:58 PM
 
1,504 posts, read 1,926,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
True. A liberal arts degrees (most of them) are expensive luxuries that don't prepare people for careers. They are a relic from a bygone era, when only rich kids went to college to study humanities, arts, etc.


This is what people don't understand.


And colleges need to change with the times. I think more colleges should offer vocational programs as a 2 or 4 year degree. That way, a student can learn a useful trade and still get a degree at the same time.
I fully agree with this and I know someone is going to say "education for the sake of education, become a citizen of the world etc..". Yes college should do all that, it should expand your world view than from beyond what you learned in high school. At the same though it should absolutely open up opportunities that a high school diploma alone cannot, otherwise what is the point of going to college if my job opportunities are the same as a high school grad? Strangely enough to I often find the people who do say "education for the sake of education, college is not a trade school, that is why you should go to a vocational school etc..." are not the college grads, struggling, underemployed working the register at Target or Stop and Shop but rather the college grads in good jobs, jobs that usually require X degree to work in, funny how that happens.

Now obviously some majors better prepare students for jobs than others; study nursing-become a nurse, studying Accounting become an Accountant, study Engineering become a Engineer etc... For the other majors I don't think they should be scrapped but maybe they should be more career focused. Maybe more focused on technical training, mastering software that companies want you to be able to use (Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative suite etc...) or heck require or strongly push internships as a requirement for graduation.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: WI
2,803 posts, read 3,009,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
In general, it is exceptionally rare. The people I was responding to were making sweeping statements that liberal arts degrees are expensive luxuries that cost $100k+.

Concerning Yale, specifically, I'm not sure your figures are accurate. 50% of Yale students receive need-based aid from Yale. 64% receive assistance from Yale or another source. 84% of Yale students graduate with no debt. Among the 16% of students who graduated with debt in 2014, the average debt was less than $15,000. If there were any students paying $250k, they paid out of pocket. I don't think we need to worry about them.

https://news.yale.edu/2015/02/27/faq...g-yale-college
https://admissions.yale.edu/financia...ctive-students
Regardless of whether they're paying for their education with loans or paying out of pocket, your statement that it is exceptionally rare to pay $250K is simply wrong.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,233 posts, read 97,370,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
If you want to get a job in nursing, business or computer, companies in those fields are wanting at least a bachelor's degree as a bare minimum. Just getting a certificate at a trade school won't count.
The minimum education level to take the nursing state board exam is an AAS. A BSN gives you a lot more options. There are still a few old "diploma schools" (basically trade schools) that are approved by the state boards of nursing. These are usually 2-3 years in length.
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