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Old 10-12-2017, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
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The JD is a terminal degree. The SjD is not. Make sense?
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Old 10-13-2017, 12:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
The JD is a terminal degree. The SjD is not. Make sense?
I'm not really familiar with the SjD, but I thought it was the law equivalent of the PhD. Is that not the case?
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Old 10-13-2017, 01:28 PM
bg7
 
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Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
The JD is a terminal degree. The SjD is not. Make sense?
"The National Association of Legal Professionals states that the J.S.D./S.J.D. is "typically the most advanced (or terminal) law degree that would follow the earning of the LL.M. and J.D. degrees."

"It is considered the "terminal degree in law" by Indiana University[5] and as the "most advanced law degree" by Harvard Law School,[6]Yale Law School (J.S.D. Handbook...."


Perhaps hold off on the LOL next time when you "correct" someone.



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Old 10-14-2017, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
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Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Not correct. The word "doctor" has nothing to do with medical, despite the many who wish to believe it.
Correct. And, as a side note, few people seem to know that the first doctors were actually lawyers.
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Old 10-14-2017, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
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Originally Posted by KaraZetterberg153 View Post
Also, law students who have law degrees from non-US countries can study in U.S. law schools and get a doctorate in U.S. law, an Lld.

The JD is a Juris Doctorate, but feels more like a master's program, since it is persued after the undergraduate degree.

Getting multiple degrees can be viewed as a way of postponing adulthood. :-)
Most doctoral students I know went into their programs right after undergraduate studies.
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Old 10-14-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
9,693 posts, read 5,283,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
"The National Association of Legal Professionals states that the J.S.D./S.J.D. is "typically the most advanced (or terminal) law degree that would follow the earning of the LL.M. and J.D. degrees."

"It is considered the "terminal degree in law" by Indiana University[5] and as the "most advanced law degree" by Harvard Law School,[6]Yale Law School (J.S.D. Handbook...."


Perhaps hold off on the LOL next time when you "correct" someone.




Correct. JD definitely isn't the terminal degree in law, at least not how most people think of terminal degrees. In fact, there are two degrees that are "higher" than the Juris Doctorate degree, including the Masters of Law degree (yes, its a "masters" degree that comes after a doctorate, but law is weird in that sense) and then the degree(s) you mention.

Note, though, there is another understanding of a terminal degree that refers to the highest level of study that you must complete in order to practice within your field. If folks are referring to this, then, yes, the JD is a terminal degree for most in the legal field as the SJD and LLM are not necessary for practice/employment/teaching at all.
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Old 10-14-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
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Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
I'm not really familiar with the SjD, but I thought it was the law equivalent of the PhD. Is that not the case?
That's correct. The JD is the professional doctorate, while the SJD is the research doctorate. I've known only a few people to get the SJD, though, which makes sense as it is not necessary to work as an attorney or to become a tenured law school professor (the JD is all that is required for that).
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