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Old 09-25-2017, 03:56 PM
 
6,268 posts, read 10,177,672 times
Reputation: 6090

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
^^^Chase it, yes - but have the sense to know when to stop, should it come to that. Too many young pre-vets fail to do that, and come in the end to regret it: High Debt and Falling Demand Trap New Veterinarians - The New York Times. The situation hasn't gotten any better since that article was published.

Keep your undergraduate degree costs as low as possible. This is crucial! See if you can get accepted into a vet school where you'll only be paying in-state tuition (but obviously you have little control over this). Cut your living expenses to the bone.

But if all of that doesn't get the educational costs below 2x starting salary, reconsider your options. Having a dream is great, but not all dreams are meant to be.
First off, those are stories from an abroad Caribbean vet school. Of course, they charge an arm and a leg. That's why you have to get a high GPA and not spend your college years working full time and sleeping during class or doing bong hits.

Secondly, the one vet said she absolutely loves her job.

If I had a choice between a working a job for 45 years that I had no passion for, and dreaded going into every Monday ... or being 300K in debt and doing a job I love, I would seriously, SERIOUSLY consider the second option.

And to be honest with you, I would probably choose it.

And I am NOT a young person.
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Old 09-25-2017, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
5,569 posts, read 2,927,329 times
Reputation: 12686
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
First off, those are stories from an abroad Caribbean vet school. Of course, they charge an arm and a leg. That's why you have to get a high GPA and not spend your college years working full time and sleeping during class or doing bong hits.
The primary vet featured in that New York Times story did go to Ross, but this is NOT a problem limited to those whose grades simply weren't good enough to get them accepted into a US vet school. That's why it's such a big issue. Tuition at US schools, including state schools, has gone up astronomically in recent years.
https://veterinarypracticenews.com/s...hered-in-debt/ And that's in addition to whatever undergraduate debt the student has already accumulated.

Sadly, vet school may be the next law school as far as debt-to-income ratio and new graduate employment prospects are concerned.

(The OP probably won't bother to read the above link, but should - as there are suggestions for ways to deal with the debt issue listed near the end of the article which he/she may find helpful.)

Quote:
Secondly, the one vet said she absolutely loves her job.

If I had a choice between a working a job for 45 years that I had no passion for, and dreaded going into every Monday ... or being 300K in debt and doing a job I love, I would seriously, SERIOUSLY consider the second option.

And to be honest with you, I would probably choose it.

And I am NOT a young person.
But will that young vet still be in love with her job 20 years from now, when the work (and it is work) has become more routine and the prospect of not being able to buy a house, send her own kids to college, or retire because of unpayable student loan debt is looming larger? Very few people, whatever their career, have the same level of passion for their work at age 45 that they had at age 25. And financial issues tend to loom larger as we age, as well. The "perpetually broke student" life gets old after a while.

Of course, right now this is a purely academic discussion, as the OP hasn't yet demonstrated the academic chops needed to even consider applying for vet school. One step at a time, which for the OP now should be getting excellent grades at community college in coursework that is transferable to a 4-year university later. Keep undergraduate debt as low as possible, and hunt down any possible scholarship money that can be found (yes, it's thin on the ground, but there is some out there). The level of undergraduate indebtedness is easier to control than the level of post-graduate indebtedness will be (because few students will receive more than one admissions offer, so they're not in a position to choose between vet schools).

And since the application-to-acceptance ratio for vet school is currently hovering somewhere around 50% at best, alternative career pathways have to be seriously considered in any case. There's no harm in investigating them now.
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Old 09-25-2017, 05:01 PM
 
6,268 posts, read 10,177,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
But will that young vet still be in love with her job 20 years from now, when the work (and it is work) has become more routine and the prospect of not being able to buy a house, send her own kids to college, or retire because of unpayable student loan debt is looming larger? Very few people, whatever their career, have the same level of passion for their work at age 45 that they had at age 25. And financial issues tend to loom larger as we age, as well. The "perpetually broke student" life gets old after a while.
If you're in love with a job when you're 25 and you don't like it 20 years from now, then what's going to happen if you hate a job when you're 25 and you're still doing that job 20 years later?

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Old 09-25-2017, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
5,569 posts, read 2,927,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
If you're in love with a job when you're 25 and you don't like it 20 years from now, then what's going to happen if you hate a job when you're 25 and you're still doing that job 20 years later?

If you're not up to your eyeballs in debt, switching careers is a possibility if you find you truly don't like your job. And I'm hardly suggesting the OP get a job he/she absolutely hates, merely that he/she not commit financial hari-kiri while chasing the veterinarian dream. Vet school isn't the only job that would allow the OP to work with animals, or the only job in the health care field. How can the OP know if some of those other jobs won't suit him/her if he/she hasn't investigated them? And if vet school IS absolutely the only career out of the hundreds of thousands of possible careers out there that the OP won't absolutely hate, then he/she is pretty screwed if he/she doesn't get in anywhere (which is more likely than not, given the ratio of applicants to acceptances).

Frankly, I wish 2nd trick op's veterinarian relative was here to comment on the thread. As a human pathologist who's been in private practice for 16 years, who knew she wanted to be a doctor since the age of four, and who graduated from medical school about $200,000 in debt, I know what it feels like to be competing fiercely for a limited number of slots, what it feels like to want that dream job so badly you'll sign any piece of paper to get it, and what it feels like when the reality of all that debt finally sinks in. I also know that everyone I know working in healthcare, while they still enjoy their jobs, has gone from absolutely loving their work to a more muted liking their work as the years passed, and no one I know graduated with a debt-to-income ratio as extreme as what many vet students are facing now.
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Old 09-25-2017, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
362 posts, read 108,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
If you're in love with a job when you're 25 and you don't like it 20 years from now, then what's going to happen if you hate a job when you're 25 and you're still doing that job 20 years later?

According to the person who can't read, as I specified I no longer wanted them commenting due to EVERY comment being to not pursue this, you're supposed to work the job you hate and hopefully use that money to make yourself happy. They also claim I should do something else and low income people like myself shouldn't pursue such careers, as stated some careers are only meant for the wealthy. Read the previous comments if you think I'm lying, it's why I no longer reply to this person cause they really either can't read or refuse to accept the fact that this is what I'm doing and they need to get off my ass and stop trying to convince me otherwise.

So to be simple and answer your question: A shrug with a good luck and maybe a Starbucks coffee once a week to make yourself feel better about the fact that you work a job you absolutely despise.
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Old 09-25-2017, 07:59 PM
 
6,268 posts, read 10,177,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K_Chris View Post
According to the person who can't read, as I specified I no longer wanted them commenting due to EVERY comment being to not pursue this, you're supposed to work the job you hate and hopefully use that money to make yourself happy. They also claim I should do something else and low income people like myself shouldn't pursue such careers, as stated some careers are only meant for the wealthy. Read the previous comments if you think I'm lying, it's why I no longer reply to this person cause they really either can't read or refuse to accept the fact that this is what I'm doing and they need to get off my ass and stop trying to convince me otherwise.

So to be simple and answer your question: A shrug with a good luck and maybe a Starbucks coffee once a week to make yourself feel better about the fact that you work a job you absolutely despise.
If you really are low income, I have no doubt they will help you out if you get into vet school.

That said, that is years away.

First step ... community college.
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Old 09-26-2017, 12:14 AM
 
6,697 posts, read 9,338,780 times
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You can always join the military and have them pay for your schooling. Also, after you become a vet, you can try to join USPHS (they don't hire many vets). Some of the agencies USPHS officers work for offer student loan repayment. Another option is to work for those federal agencies directly without joining USPHS.

Unless the current administration does away with the program, if you make 120 student loan payments while working for a government or non-profit employer, then the rest of your loans will be forgiven.
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Old 09-26-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
362 posts, read 108,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
You can always join the military and have them pay for your schooling. Also, after you become a vet, you can try to join USPHS (they don't hire many vets). Some of the agencies USPHS officers work for offer student loan repayment. Another option is to work for those federal agencies directly without joining USPHS.

Unless the current administration does away with the program, if you make 120 student loan payments while working for a government or non-profit employer, then the rest of your loans will be forgiven.
I'd have done that already if it's an option, but it isn't for me, and dont ask why.
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:20 PM
 
6,697 posts, read 9,338,780 times
Reputation: 4872
Quote:
Originally Posted by K_Chris View Post
I'd have done that already if it's an option, but it isn't for me, and dont ask why.
As someone who has a dog, customer service skills are very important for vet techs, veterinarians, and front office staff. I'm not trying to be rude, but you're going to have to work on your temperament and communication skills. People are trying to help, and your responses come across as unappreciative and rude.


Since you don't seem to be very receptive, no one can help you further, and this thread should probably be closed.
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Old 09-26-2017, 04:33 PM
 
609 posts, read 241,650 times
Reputation: 1436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
If you're not up to your eyeballs in debt, switching careers is a possibility if you find you truly don't like your job. And I'm hardly suggesting the OP get a job he/she absolutely hates, merely that he/she not commit financial hari-kiri while chasing the veterinarian dream. Vet school isn't the only job that would allow the OP to work with animals, or the only job in the health care field. How can the OP know if some of those other jobs won't suit him/her if he/she hasn't investigated them? And if vet school IS absolutely the only career out of the hundreds of thousands of possible careers out there that the OP won't absolutely hate, then he/she is pretty screwed if he/she doesn't get in anywhere (which is more likely than not, given the ratio of applicants to acceptances).

Frankly, I wish 2nd trick op's veterinarian relative was here to comment on the thread. As a human pathologist who's been in private practice for 16 years, who knew she wanted to be a doctor since the age of four, and who graduated from medical school about $200,000 in debt, I know what it feels like to be competing fiercely for a limited number of slots, what it feels like to want that dream job so badly you'll sign any piece of paper to get it, and what it feels like when the reality of all that debt finally sinks in. I also know that everyone I know working in healthcare, while they still enjoy their jobs, has gone from absolutely loving their work to a more muted liking their work as the years passed, and no one I know graduated with a debt-to-income ratio as extreme as what many vet students are facing now.
Just about everyone becomes disillusioned with their job after twenty years. Avoiding vet school is no way to avoid this.

And the fact of the matter is that ALL education is costing more and at the same time being devalued in the workplace. A 'mere' bachelor's degree no longer ensures a good salary, and most people are looking at needing at least a graduate degree to live a middle class life.

I think the point has been made many times over. OP is now well advised of the cost of a veterinary degree. I don't think you are going to convince the entire world to avoid the field of medicine or veterinary medicine, so that drumbeat is pointless.
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