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Old 09-27-2017, 07:30 AM
 
174 posts, read 66,084 times
Reputation: 139

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get your employer to do it !
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Old 09-27-2017, 09:54 AM
 
125 posts, read 62,176 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
Our son is double majoring in Mathematics and Computer Science and should be graduating in the spring.

My wife thinks he should go straight for his Master's degree, and I think he should find an employer who will pay for it, and go to school at night.

We are both coming at this from personal experience. She got her Master's right after her Bachelor's, while I went to night school for computer programming while working full time.

I know there are pro's and con's to each choice, and ultimately it's our son's decision. But I'm wondering what others' experiences have been.
First and foremost, it depends on the program as others have mentioned.


From my experience, had my employer pay for my Master's degree, and I took courses in the evenings/nights. Due to my full time job I needed 3 years to finish rather than the standard 2 years. While I saved around $80k in tuition costs, if I could do it all over again I would've pursued my Master's degree full time, even with student loans. Here are my reasons:


1. Timing - My cohort that started the Master's program was primarily comprised of full time graduate students with no full time job to juggle. They finished in 2 years while I stayed behind for one more year and lost those familiar faces who I worked on projects with. Also, trying to schedule mostly night classes gave me significant challenges during enrollment each semester. I missed out on some great team projects simply because I wasn't able to take some of the daytime classes with some exceptional classmates (and faculty).


2. Fatigue - I had trouble being fully engaged with my studies and classmates due to the fatigue of juggling my full time job and attending night classes. I wasn't able to give grad school my maximum effort, and my classmates sometimes had to pick up the slack during group projects. This wasn't fair to them.


3. Relationships and networking - My full time classmates got to know the faculty well and the faculty helped establish connections with those in academia and industry. Many of my classmates got some great job offers because of this. More painful was my realization that many of my classmates became friends with each other while I was too busy to really get to know them. I gradually became the odd man out since I was unable to attend most of our grad school social functions.


Ultimately, it's a personal decision for your son but since he's pursuing a high paying field maybe the tuition costs won't be as big of a concern.
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Old 09-30-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,430 posts, read 2,821,502 times
Reputation: 5893
Thought there was education in my family tree, I see that op's takes the cake. That's good, glad to see there are parents and families that still value education in the United States.

My parents helped to pay for my undergrad age 17 to 21. My Dad paid a bit more than half, I took out student loans and worked summers for the other half. Seem to work out great I had that student loan paid off in only a few years after graduating.

As for grad school, my dad wanted me to go right after undergrad stating it was much easier to do so intellectually and schedule-wise. He was probably right, for a master of science. I explored master of science through several schools just a few years after completing undergrad. I think it depends in the student. In my case, I wasn't mature enough or motivated enough to complete that master's degree after just a few years in the working world. I wanted experience instead. Plus, I never did get that master of science. Did that harm me or not in that phase in my career, tough to say even here 20 something years later.

Roughly 15 years after completing my undergrad, after very careful research, I entered an MBA program. MBA programs are a little bit different, in that the average student used to have a median age of late twenties. I do not know if those stats have changed the past 10 years, but it makes sense. I in contrast was in my late 30s when I began the program and just flipped 41 wants completed. That was tougher in terms of scheduling, and I'm convinced I was not as mentally sharp at that age as I would have been perhaps ten years prior,.

It worked out in the end, MBA has served me very well indeed. Research carefully and do what is right for your particular situation as best you can based on the facts, statistics, and your gut feelings.
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Old 09-30-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The end of the world
314 posts, read 123,436 times
Reputation: 254
I would tell him/her to pay for his own masters including dorm, move out and dis-own his parents and leave it the hospital to take care of them. Because if this is about money it is not going to end in a positive light.
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Old 10-01-2017, 05:27 AM
 
4,007 posts, read 9,890,972 times
Reputation: 1794
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanArt View Post
I would tell him/her to pay for his own masters including dorm, move out and dis-own his parents and leave it the hospital to take care of them. Because if this is about money it is not going to end in a positive light.
I have no idea what you are talking about??? What hospital? What dorm?

Disown the parents? What the heck? Why?

Your post makes no sense.
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Old 10-01-2017, 05:28 AM
 
4,007 posts, read 9,890,972 times
Reputation: 1794
Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post

Georgia Tech offers a very popular online master's in computer science that is less than $7,000, but if you can get your employer to pay for it, that's even better. Your son might find a lot of people on tech forums who are completing their degrees online and are having them paid for by employers. I know a few on distance education forums.
Interesting. Thank you for that info. My son is a senior in high school, so he has a ways to go, but this may be something he is interested in later.
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Old 10-01-2017, 07:01 PM
 
2,198 posts, read 1,231,401 times
Reputation: 2859
Depends on the program and the field. I worked for several years before getting a masters in my field. It benefited me in a number of ways as the experience I had was valued and I was offered an assistantship that paid my tuition in exchange for working for the university. Some fields want freshly matriculated students to mold. As others have said, if a company pays for it, there is usually a payback required (e.g., work here for X years). If he loves where he is working, that might be worth it. But if he doesn't?
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