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Old 10-06-2017, 09:06 PM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,752,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
The degree will simply say PSU, it won't specify.
What does it say on the transcript? I've only come across a couple of employers who cared to see my diplomas; the majority wanted my transcripts.

Regardless, I still think that's a lot of money to spend just to take finance courses from an unranked school.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:05 AM
 
1,940 posts, read 3,306,001 times
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From a quick internet search it appears that UNC-Chapel Hill also offers on-line Business Degrees. Are they an affordable alternative to the UNC-Pembroke courses?


FWIW - I earned my Masters in Engineering from a Distance Learning program back in the late 1990's. Dozens of students met in remote classrooms across the country, with a Proctor, and watched video tapes of on-campus lectures held only two days earlier. My diploma does not identify that I obtained my degree via Distance Learning, it looks identical to the diplomas awarded to those who studied on-campus
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Old 10-18-2017, 03:24 PM
 
608 posts, read 296,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
From a quick internet search it appears that UNC-Chapel Hill also offers on-line Business Degrees. Are they an affordable alternative to the UNC-Pembroke courses?


FWIW - I earned my Masters in Engineering from a Distance Learning program back in the late 1990's. Dozens of students met in remote classrooms across the country, with a Proctor, and watched video tapes of on-campus lectures held only two days earlier. My diploma does not identify that I obtained my degree via Distance Learning, it looks identical to the diplomas awarded to those who studied on-campus
The time when questions come up is when your resume shows you obtained a degree from Penn State in 2017 while also clearly being employed for a company in North Carolina at the same time. I just had this topic come up in a job interview today. Of course, some employers may see those conflicting dates/locations on the resume and just assume the applicant is a bad liar, never even giving the applicant a chance to explain.

Just something to keep in mind.
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Old 10-18-2017, 11:13 PM
 
Location: The end of the world
314 posts, read 123,260 times
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1. In college there is no difference between a 17 and 71 year old.

2. If you are with children and your attempting to make career swaps

3. What is important is the grade and that depends on the major and line or work you intend to do. You can get the piece of paper or whatever but what use are you to people working in a specific business?

4. My opinion you go back to college that is nearby with something you know that people will want you for and your needs, along with your experience. Then you kick arse. Not swap your career goals.

What is the difference between self taught and people doing business. They have licenses and know how and where to do the business.
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Old 11-09-2017, 07:29 PM
 
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school ranking is useless. What you should look at are the companies that actively recruit from the schools you're looking into and some schools aren't "top 10" in general but top for your program. Overall, stop worrying about the school and start worrying about yourself. School prestige means nothing if you're not good. If you are good and gain experience, it still means nothing. Just go somewhere you're comfortable.
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Old 11-09-2017, 10:25 PM
 
6,308 posts, read 4,772,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarianRavenwood View Post
But as you said, an employer isn't going to know if you got your degree online or campus. So I'm not sure this ranking means much.
I would know. If I thought someone had achieved his degree online, I would be a lot more penetrating in terms of asking which professors they liked best, whether they could get one to write a recommendation, etc. I think 60% of learning is peer-to-peer and the rest comes from lectures and homework.
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Old 11-10-2017, 02:29 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,802 posts, read 37,487,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
It may make a difference to SOME employers when you're hired for your FIRST job. After that, it will matter very little.
And for my employer (and MANY others (including both my kid's employers))
Alma mater MATTERS a lot!!! (Not that it ever mattered to me...) Either you can do the job... or NOT!


But...
Many top tier alumni 'watch-out-for-their-own' very carefully. (and seem to be loyal to 'tuition payers' of their own previous school.)

You need to put yourself in the seat of a hiring manager... (hiring is Huge risk) anything you can do to reduce that risk is of benefit.

Get the best degree you can afford. otherwise... you gotta be GOOD!

For many (especially grad school) they CHOOSE the school based on the 'contacts' / future opportunities availed (only) to alumni.
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Old 11-10-2017, 02:39 AM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,752,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
I would know. If I thought someone had achieved his degree online, I would be a lot more penetrating in terms of asking which professors they liked best, whether they could get one to write a recommendation, etc. I think 60% of learning is peer-to-peer and the rest comes from lectures and homework.
Online students get letters of recommendation all the time.
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Old 11-12-2017, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
906 posts, read 408,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarianRavenwood View Post
I don't agree that Penn State is the obvious choice.

For overall school ranking, Penn State and UNC are both good schools overall. Their names have cache. But overall school ranking doesn't mean much to a hiring manager--because it considers a lot besides academics. Campus culture, health and safety, diversity, etc.

Hiring managers know what schools are top-ranked in their field and your alma mater is only likely to score you more interviews and offers. But Penn State's business school is only ranked 36 (depending on which list you look at). That's not great. It's better than UNC's unranked position but the difference between these two isn't that much. Certainly Penn State's business program is closer in the rankings to UNC than to any of the top-tier business schools.

And while a top-ranked school may earn you more interviews and offers, it's really unlikely to earn you more money. Again if you were talking about the #1 school in the country, that would be different. But even then, you wouldn't be offered an extra $40k to make up your extra tuition expenses. Maybe you'd get an extra $2-3k your first year. After a year or two out of school, no one's really looking at your alma mater. You've either proven yourself or you haven't, and that's what your income will be based on.

Also keep in mind that while you are in school and for a year or two after, GPA will have some impact. And a 4.0 at a lower ranked school will do more for you than a low GPA at a better school. So think hard about which school is likely to help you excel.

There are a lot of business schools out there. I'd take another look and see if there is a better option that offers both better reputation AND lower tuition.
I agree. UNC is a public ivy and a quality option at lower cost. The choice of major matters far more than the prestige of the university. A degree in philosophy from Harvard is far less useful in the job market than a degree in cyber security from University of South Florida. The latter would be in much higher demand with very high salaries relative to the average college graduate.

Is a degree in finance in demand for the expected area of employment?

Do a search on indeed.com, dice.com, or linkedin with key words for the job you want.

A business degree focused on data mining and business intelligence at point-of-sale for eCommerce
would likely generate a lot of job offers. It's something to think about.
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