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Old 10-14-2017, 05:00 PM
 
7 posts, read 6,298 times
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I'm 28 and I'll be starting my freshman year of college in January. I have a full time job working 40 hours a week and I'll be a full time student doing my classes online.

While reading about the wildlife biologist education and career path, I read that it's best to gain experience in the field by interning, volunteering and/or working seasonal jobs throughout college at zoos and conservations to gain the 5 years of related experience necessary to become certified with The Wildlife Society.
Is this possible while working full time and going to school full time?

I also want to get my masters in wildlife biology after I receive my bachelor's.

Will I need my masters and certification before I can begin working as a wildlife biologist or can I begin working as one after I have my bachelor's while I'm pursuing my masters and certification?

Any and all advice about what I can and need to do would be greatly appreciated!!
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:06 PM
 
9,347 posts, read 15,792,238 times
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Does the on-line program offer internship opportunities? How are you going to do your labs? Does the Wildlife Society certification mean anything as in is it a common job requirement? I guess you can do it if you want to work seven days a week for the next four years.
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:18 PM
 
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No, the online program doesn't. I'm starting off at a local community college taking the classes online and I'll be getting my associates degree in either agriculture or general studies before transferring to a 4 year university to finish the last 2 years for my bachelor's in their wildlife biology program. I can work any lab days around my work schedule. Becoming certified with the Society will allow me to make the most of my career and salary.
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Old 10-14-2017, 08:31 PM
 
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I don't see how a 2 year general studies degree is going to count for the first 2 years of a wildlife biology degree. You are more likely to have 3 years to complete instead of two, unless you plan the classes of your 2 year degree just right. You better double check everything with the 4 year institution that you want to transfer to so you don't have any surprises.
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,042 posts, read 8,199,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F.daniels View Post
I'm 28 and I'll be starting my freshman year of college in January. I have a full time job working 40 hours a week and I'll be a full time student doing my classes online.

While reading about the wildlife biologist education and career path, I read that it's best to gain experience in the field by interning, volunteering and/or working seasonal jobs throughout college at zoos and conservations to gain the 5 years of related experience necessary to become certified with The Wildlife Society.
Is this possible while working full time and going to school full time?

I also want to get my masters in wildlife biology after I receive my bachelor's.

Will I need my masters and certification before I can begin working as a wildlife biologist or can I begin working as one after I have my bachelor's while I'm pursuing my masters and certification?

Any and all advice about what I can and need to do would be greatly appreciated!!
People always like to say they went to school full time and worked full time, but if you do some simple math you'll see it's next to impossible. You'll need to do at least one of those part time.
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Old 10-17-2017, 08:06 AM
 
32,730 posts, read 22,676,881 times
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This is difficult. There are semesters where I had 3, even 4, lab sciences.

The Wildlife Society Certification can wait as well. Loads of people don't have it, especially at the beginning.


And I too don't see how 2 years of general studies will get you halfway to this degree. I think I had two true electives in four years. It was bio 1/2, chem 1/2, genetics 101/102, organic chem 201/202, statistics, plant systematics, dendrology, loads of ecology classes, etc starting right from the beginning.
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Old 10-17-2017, 08:33 AM
 
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And for a masters, forget about it. You're going to be working non stop on research and a thesis, in addition to coursework, and possibly teaching as well.
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Old 10-17-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,695 posts, read 64,172,365 times
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Do your 2-yr. online degree. Then when you transfer to a 4-year college, you'll have to let the job go, so you can take those internships, and do the volunteer opportunities. You'll have to be like other college students, and get whatever part-time jobs you can, during the academic year, and do summer internships. If you qualify for financial aid, you could get a work-study job on campus, which would be really convenient. At the graduate level, the work-study jobs pay more, btw. Or you might score a TA position, teaching the entry-level wildlife bio you'll be taking in your undergrad program. Or you may get a research assistantship.
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Old 10-17-2017, 10:22 AM
 
32,730 posts, read 22,676,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Do your 2-yr. online degree. .

Respectfully, I don't know how this can be done online for this degree. So much of it is field work based. Even in entry level ecology and wildlife courses there is a lab with some outside component. Maybe the first year can be done all on a computer, but I have no idea how even intro to chemistry can be done without labwork.
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Old 10-18-2017, 04:09 PM
 
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There are multiple ways labs are completed by distance learning students, but a lot of colleges don't have these options. There are virtual labs, at-home labs, and hybrid courses that require campus visits for labs. You just have to make sure you take the "for science majors" course.

It's actually easier to find online programs in biology and biological science at the master's level than at the baccalaureate level. Some might require a short campus visit and others are 100% online. Some don't make the thesis option available to online students.
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