U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-01-2017, 05:03 PM
 
7,031 posts, read 3,770,069 times
Reputation: 8362

Advertisements

Since 1983, the research arm of the College Board has sliced and diced student loan data from the U.S. Department of Education. This year's report has just been released. I will put the link on the end for anyone who is interested in FACTUAL data on student loans and not just hyperbole.

Here are some key facts:

- Percentage of students who borrow for UNDERGRADUATE level: 56% of students graduating in 2000-2001 had student debt upon graduation from college. In 2005-06, that number was 56%. In 2010-11, the number was 60%.

The percentage seven years later, for students graduating in 2016, was also 60%.

So, while the percentage of undergraduates borrowing for their undergraduate degrees has grown by 4% when compared with 16 years ago, it has NOT grown in the last 5 years.

- Breakdown of average student debt levels for UNDERGRADUATE students graduating in 2016:

Note: these numbers are for undergraduates only. They do not include GRADUATE students, medical students, law school students, etc. Only undergraduate college students.

Among undergraduates who borrowed, the average amount of student debt for undergraduate students graduating with a bachelor's degree last year was $28,400.

Among those who borrowed, the average amount of debt for undergraduate students graduating from PUBLIC colleges last year was $27,000.

Among those who borrowed, the average amount of debt for undergraduate students graduating from PRIVATE NONPROFIT colleges last year was $32,000.

- Distribution of Federal Student Debt

These numbers include ALL student loan borrowers, both graduate and undergraduate students.

- Fifty-seven percent of all Federal student loan borrowers owe less than $20,000 on their student loans in 2017

- Only 12% of all Federal student loan borrowers owe $60,000 or more in student loans. Those students account formore than half of all outstanding student loans

To read the full report, which has detailed data on things like repayment rates, average debt for graduate students, and information on other types of financial aid, see this link:

https://trends.collegeboard.org/site...dent-aid_0.pdf

Last edited by RosieSD; 11-01-2017 at 05:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-01-2017, 06:04 PM
 
7,031 posts, read 3,770,069 times
Reputation: 8362
Sorry, I mean to include another data point. Here is how the average amount borrowed has changed for students graduating from college (in other words, not including debt accumulated for graduate or professional school):

2000-1 $22,100
2005-06 $24,400
2010-11 $26,400
2015015 $28,400
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 06:11 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 586,960 times
Reputation: 1396
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
In 10-20 years, America and Americans will be one of the most uneducated country and citizenry on the planet. No degree is worthless. College is not a job training program. It never was.
Yep no longer will higher education produce well read people with a broad base of knowledge in many subjects, they now want to create a culture of geniuses in only a hand full of disciplines, even in K-12 most school districts seem to be turning their focus to S.T.E.M to the detriment of all else. Yes if a student has a natural aptitude and love for math and science then by all means guide him down that path, but if someone has a love of the arts, history, social science and the other soft sciences(hate that term) then he should be guided down those paths.

what we have now is our young people going into subjects and field they don't have a passion for because thats where they are told where the jobs are at or they are beat over the head being told the world needs more people in the stem fields.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 10:18 AM
 
723 posts, read 497,096 times
Reputation: 1014
^^^ I have kids in elementary and middle schools, and I am not seeing this. Yes, there appears to be an increased emphasis on math and science (more options for electives), but there should be, because of the evolving role of technology in our society requiring evolving skill sets.

But it is not an either-or situation. Increased science and math education does not mean decreased education in language arts or literature. Critical thinking, logic, and learning how to best communicate your ideas, can be taught across all of those subject matters -- yes, even science and math.

Students choosing the best educational track for themselves, with an eye on how that impacts their career options down the road, does not mean the student views an education solely as a job training program. If the desire for learning other subjects is already within them, they will find opportunities to do so, whether it be in a formal university setting or elsewhere.
If they have no such desire, then forcing them to attend a university in order to obtain a degree will not make them become more academically enlightened.

IMHO, the period during K-12 is the optimal time when the seed for love of broad-based learning should be planted. 4 years in a university setting for someone ill-suited for it will come too late. Perhaps they will benefit from it later in life, on their own terms, when their interests have changed. Perhaps not. You can't force a square peg into a round hole.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 10:49 AM
 
146 posts, read 60,974 times
Reputation: 345
Every course has a capacity to broaden and expand a person.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2017, 12:38 AM
 
673 posts, read 246,658 times
Reputation: 484
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Actually, college is suppose to be a job training program. Once you have your degree and career then you can take up those worthless courses if you desire. Won’t improve your chances for promotion, but you’ll feel better at having learned to hate USA, hate the military, and blame the white man for all the problems.
As a history major, I learned a lot about this. It's not about blaming one particular person or race, but when you have a consistent track record of 500+years, you start to see some trends. Anyone that believes otherwise is just plain ignorant.

And in some people's defense, its hard not to hate a country, when you are born here, and still treated like a second class citizen because of the color of your skin or what you look like.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2017, 08:31 AM
 
14,441 posts, read 16,350,238 times
Reputation: 12905
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
Sorry, I mean to include another data point. Here is how the average amount borrowed has changed for students graduating from college (in other words, not including debt accumulated for graduate or professional school):

2000-1 $22,100
2005-06 $24,400
2010-11 $26,400
2015015 $28,400
60% have student loan debt upon graduation(4-year degree) and 40% graduate with zero college loan debt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 605,139 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fifty Percent Off View Post
Every course has a capacity to broaden and expand a person.
And one of the interesting things about an applicant is the array of courses he chose in order to do that. The least interesting folks (perhaps not surprisingly) tend to be those who simply tried to monetize their educations. I'm looking for core competency of course, but also for what someone picked out just for the sake of curiosity and the love of learning. It's people with those sorts of attributes who end up winning starting jobs in the big leagues.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2017, 07:20 AM
 
Location: USA
6,171 posts, read 4,969,110 times
Reputation: 10551
I think those calling college "worthless" are the ones who majored in areas that don't pay. Those who majored in engineering, medicine, computer science or law are singing a different tune.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2017, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 605,139 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
I think those calling college "worthless" are the ones who majored in areas that don't pay. Those who majored in engineering, medicine, computer science or law are singing a different tune.
Those who majored in engineering, medicine, computer science or law because they were told they'd make a ton of money in those fields are apt to be divorced, in rehab, and in second careers by now. Like any tool, college is only beneficial if you use it properly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top