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Old 11-27-2017, 08:15 PM
 
1,399 posts, read 1,080,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CamMcllel View Post
Get real, a degree makes a huge difference.

"College graduates, on average, earned 56% more than high school grads in 2015, according to data compiled by the Economic Policy Institute. That was up from 51% in 1999 and is the largest such gap in EPI's figures dating to 1973." https://www.usatoday.com/story/money...cord/96493348/
Yes, it's true that college graduates earn more than non-college graduates but I think that's beside the point. Although I dont agree with the OP, his/her point is that most jobs, outside of STEM, don't require the skills one gets while earning a college degree.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
One thing I learned years ago. Never hiRE someone who worked in a huge bureaucracy such as the SSA or your state agency. They get into the private sector and simply don't know how to function. Meanwhile, the people I've known who worked in private sector and then went to work in government unanimously complain about the sheer inertia they encounter when it comes to getting the simplest things done.
If you havent already, you need to watch a movie called "Brazil". Really funny spoof on the countless levels of government bureaucracy.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
My daugher in law has a journalism degree, she works for Stanford University and makes more than most people with STEM degrees.
I would guess though that your daughter is 1/1000 journalism majors. If you've got the brain it's better to go for a computer science or chemical engineering degree. If you can make it through a program like that then a salary over $100k is easily obtainable...............with just a bachelors, no grad school. And that's across the board. Not 1/1000 but more like 999/1000.
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Old 11-27-2017, 09:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HTY483 View Post
I would guess though that your daughter is 1/1000 journalism majors. If you've got the brain it's better to go for a computer science or chemical engineering degree. If you can make it through a program like that then a salary over $100k is easily obtainable...............with just a bachelors, no grad school. And that's across the board. Not 1/1000 but more like 999/1000.
I have a link earlier in this thread that shows comparative salaries for various majors. I am too tired to argue with you, but you would be surprised at how the 50th percentile of journalism majors make more than the 50th percentile of majors such as architecture and a host of others.

In others words, just because you haven't considered how that major could turn into a viable job doesn't make it so.
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Old 11-28-2017, 03:45 AM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,747,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTY483 View Post
Yes, it's true that college graduates earn more than non-college graduates but I think that's beside the point. Although I dont agree with the OP, his/her point is that most jobs, outside of STEM, don't require the skills one gets while earning a college degree.
This is not true for all STEM jobs. IT can be self-taught. Even people who have gone to college for IT, CS, or IS end up self-studying programming languages and for certification exams. Throughout your career, you have to be able to learn things on your own because technology is constantly changing, and most of the stuff you learned in college will become obsolete. Honestly, a lot of the stuff will be out of date by the time you graduate. The only reason why you need a degree for many IT jobs is to get past the human resources filter.

Many people with biology degrees end up in lab jobs, and there are many lab jobs that can be done with on-the-job training. They might say that they require a degree, but there is usually a company somewhere hiring people to do the same type of work with just a high school diploma and a couple of college-level, science courses.
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Old 11-28-2017, 05:45 AM
 
723 posts, read 495,084 times
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Originally Posted by L210 View Post
This is not true for all STEM jobs. IT can be self-taught. Even people who have gone to college for IT, CS, or IS end up self-studying programming languages and for certification exams. Throughout your career, you have to be able to learn things on your own because technology is constantly changing, and most of the stuff you learned in college will become obsolete. Honestly, a lot of the stuff will be out of date by the time you graduate. The only reason why you need a degree for many IT jobs is to get past the human resources filter.
It certainly can be, and historically has been, a self-taught profession. But in certain areas, is it not changing to require more formal certifications/and or a degree?





Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Many people with biology degrees end up in lab jobs, and there are many lab jobs that can be done with on-the-job training. They might say that they require a degree, but there is usually a company somewhere hiring people to do the same type of work with just a high school diploma and a couple of college-level, science courses.
I believe a fair portion of those with a terminal bachelor's in biology (or something similar) did so with the hopes of using it as a stepping stone towards a professional degree, such as medicine. Many of those not able to gain entry were then left with more limited job prospects, such as lab techs. For those intentionally entering lab tech professions, they now offer 2 year lab tech certifications at the community college level.

Long-term careers in many of the biological sciences require a PhD. And even then, may not by itself, directly lead to jobs - unlike those in the medical professions. There may be many other variables involved, including the type of research focused in the thesis, quality of publications, technical skills gained, previous job experiences, communication and interviewing skills, etc. It's generally considered a higher risk field in that regard. But I found plenty of career opportunities in my particular field as a freshly minted PhD, had I chosen to pursue them.

Last edited by mingna; 11-28-2017 at 06:40 AM..
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Old 11-28-2017, 06:20 AM
 
2,244 posts, read 808,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTY483 View Post
Yes, it's true that college graduates earn more than non-college graduates but I think that's beside the point. Although I dont agree with the OP, his/her point is that most jobs, outside of STEM, don't require the skills one gets while earning a college degree.
Maybe itís not the degree as much as it is the person who obtains the degree. In many cases, itís the personality, grit, and ambition that it takes to get a particular education that are larger factors than sheer intellect. People should check out books like Outliers and Grit for better insights into this phenomenon.
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Old 11-28-2017, 10:40 AM
 
1,481 posts, read 592,780 times
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The only thing I learned in college was how to survive and get the degree. This was the most useful skill I needed in the world of work. A year of law school taught me to be truly cynical about the fairness of the law, or of any other situation in life that involves powerful people and instiutions. An MBA gave me only three useful skills, statistics, programming in Basic, and the concept of the future value of money. Every other skill I had and used in 42 years in the work world was learned and perfected on the job and job sponsored training. I've been retired 10 years and I believe the two most important things a person can get in life is a job they love and a partner they love. The rest (kids, grandkids, friends, money, travel, hobbies, etc.) is all gravy.
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Old 11-28-2017, 10:56 AM
 
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In college, I learned what a total sham the social scheme of high school had been, and also that being in charge of a basic decision-making scheme was not at all easy, but rather something continuously requiring a good deal of careful thought and consideration.
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Old 11-28-2017, 05:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mingna View Post
It certainly can be, and historically has been, a self-taught profession. But in certain areas, is it not changing to require more formal certifications/and or a degree?
Degree requirements are becoming more common in IT, but they aren't exactly necessary a lot of the time. I won't go into detail about coding bootcamps, but graduates are landing programming jobs without related degrees.

I'm just refuting the argument that STEM jobs somehow require a college education in able to perform the jobs and other fields don't. Many highly-skilled IT professionals don't have a degree, and they are obviously capable of doing their jobs. I would argue that some non-STEM fields require a college education moreso than some STEM fields.
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