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Old 10-26-2017, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,276 posts, read 929,272 times
Reputation: 4974

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Don't get me wrong when I say this, but I think my MBA was a waste of $120K.

I didn't even particularly want to major in this field but it was the only program available for adults working full-time. I was in a job that was pretty much as far as I could go WITHOUT the degree. I was already working in the field of the degree.


I had to leave a pre-med program at age 18 (full scholarship) to work full-time since my family needed the funds. I didn't go back and of course continued working. I went back to college at age 31 to start my B.S. degree.

I did enjoy learning and still go out of my way to learn as much as I can. If there was a job for "Perpetual Student" then I would apply for it I earn about the same as my counterparts in upper management without the MBA.

Bachelor's degrees are becoming de rigeur for even entry level jobs--where they should not even be needed. Masters degrees are becoming so commonplace that they are generally not worth the paper they are printed on. Sorry to say it but part of the work I do is hiring and this is feedback from places I hire for. The Masters degrees that still mean something are going to be in healthcare or in the STEM fields. If you insist upon a master's degree, make sure it is your passion and not something you are doing to move up in a career that isn't "you".

Be careful of "degree mills" and make sure that your program is accredited. Look at public universities--a lot of them now offer decent programs.

Always do your research before you jump into a degree program and don't do it expecting to come out making a giant salary upfront.
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Old 10-26-2017, 01:09 PM
 
120 posts, read 44,725 times
Reputation: 103
Honestly I think college is great but some students not all dont have good parents period. Some think going to college is like you made it no matter what major you choose. but their mistake is they didnt help their kids figure out what they were interested in for majors. I agree that some degrees are trash , in fact i would say maybe 50% or more majors are worthless , maybe only 40% of actual specific majors are good choices things like STEM, Marketing/Finance, Accounting, Business, HR or Medical fields are all good . I was just lucky to have parents ( mom was a nurse / dad a engineer ) who guided me into STEM, and plus I was already into computers as a kid so it worked out pretty well. So I blame parents and the lack of knowledge [parents or future students have of what is actually a good major.
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Old 10-26-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 602,607 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
I personally have three degrees and there's still days I question the value of any of them.
That's puzzling. How do you explain it? Was it your intention at the time to pursue useless degrees? Did the school lie to you about what the course content was going to be?
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Old 10-26-2017, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 602,607 times
Reputation: 2723
Yes, be a STEM major if that work intrigues you. But there are language majors, librarians, and museum curators making more than a mid-range STEM tech.
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:02 PM
 
6,956 posts, read 10,840,112 times
Reputation: 7443
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
That's puzzling. How do you explain it? Was it your intention at the time to pursue useless degrees? Did the school lie to you about what the course content was going to be?
Well. It was predestined since before my birth that my parents send me to a reputable 4 year college after high school, so that was going to happen.

The other degrees were half-a@@ed semi-misguided attempts to increase my salary/hireability/job role desirability through educational attainment.

They really didn't cost me that much though. I didn't have any debt from any of them.

One was paid for by my parents, one was paid for while working FT, the other was paid by unemployment during the recession.

Still, waste of effort and time.
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Old 10-26-2017, 11:04 PM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,752,987 times
Reputation: 5059
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
I'll make sure to tell my wife and her sister that what they went through doesn't matter, because statistically they are an outlier.
Your statistics are crap anyway, because only HALF of students who start college, actually graduate.


https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/fres...-finds-n465606


So looky here, there are ALLOT more people in my wife's position than you thought.
Their experiences are not generalizable. I saw a huge pay increase after graduating from college. My experience doesn't cancel out your sister and wife's experiences, and their experiences don't cancel out mine. When you're speaking to a broad audience, you have to go by what is most like to happen, not by what happened to outliers. Would you tell people not to drive just because there's a small chance they could die in an accident? Thousands of people will die in accidents each year, but hundreds of millions won't.

Did you not read the post on how student loan data are tracked for everyone, including dropouts?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soulstriker View Post
Honestly I think college is great but some students not all dont have good parents period. Some think going to college is like you made it no matter what major you choose. but their mistake is they didnt help their kids figure out what they were interested in for majors. I agree that some degrees are trash , in fact i would say maybe 50% or more majors are worthless , maybe only 40% of actual specific majors are good choices things like STEM, Marketing/Finance, Accounting, Business, HR or Medical fields are all good . I was just lucky to have parents ( mom was a nurse / dad a engineer ) who guided me into STEM, and plus I was already into computers as a kid so it worked out pretty well. So I blame parents and the lack of knowledge [parents or future students have of what is actually a good major.
It's interesting that you brought up marketing since it's one field that accepts a wide variety of degrees including psychology, English, communications, and journalism. Marketing is not a hard skill; it's a soft skill. Marketing courses are nothing but watered-down psychology courses with some business thrown in.

I don't know why you slashed marketing with finance when those degree programs are nothing alike. Finance is a quantitative subject while marketing is generally not.

Business administration and management majors have a high underemployment rate due to oversaturation in the market. Those are, by far, the most common majors. Psychology is a distant second.

Last edited by L210; 10-26-2017 at 11:19 PM..
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:59 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
765 posts, read 480,089 times
Reputation: 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Their experiences are not generalizable. I saw a huge pay increase after graduating from college. My experience doesn't cancel out your sister and wife's experiences, and their experiences don't cancel out mine. When you're speaking to a broad audience, you have to go by what is most like to happen, not by what happened to outliers. Would you tell people not to drive just because there's a small chance they could die in an accident? Thousands of people will die in accidents each year, but hundreds of millions won't.

Did you not read the post on how student loan data are tracked for everyone, including dropouts?



It's interesting that you brought up marketing since it's one field that accepts a wide variety of degrees including psychology, English, communications, and journalism. Marketing is not a hard skill; it's a soft skill. Marketing courses are nothing but watered-down psychology courses with some business thrown in.

I don't know why you slashed marketing with finance when those degree programs are nothing alike. Finance is a quantitative subject while marketing is generally not.

Business administration and management majors have a high underemployment rate due to oversaturation in the market. Those are, by far, the most common majors. Psychology is a distant second.

I did read the statistics listed, I know it includes dropouts. My point is that if half of all college students drop out and never attain a degree, it is proof that these students shouldn't have been in college to begin with, and would have been better served with technical school. My wife would have been in a better position if she had of attained her L.P.N. right out of high school, instead of wasting 7 months in college, with nothing to show for it. This is just an example of kids being pressured to go to college by their peers/parents/high school staff.


The same study that was mentioned in the article, stated that students who started later in life only had a 39% graduation rate, significantly worse that those that went straight out of high school.


I agree with the other posters that parents need to do a better job of helping their children decide what they want to do with their life.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,242 posts, read 3,400,294 times
Reputation: 8783
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
I agree with the other posters that parents need to do a better job of helping their children decide what they want to do with their life.
Easier said than done.

How "together" were YOU at age 18? How well did you take parental advice? My main goal at age 18 was to get out from under the thumb of my parents.

I didn't figure out what I wanted until about 23, and adjusted again around 27.
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Old 10-27-2017, 03:11 PM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,752,987 times
Reputation: 5059
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
I did read the statistics listed, I know it includes dropouts. My point is that if half of all college students drop out and never attain a degree, it is proof that these students shouldn't have been in college to begin with, and would have been better served with technical school. My wife would have been in a better position if she had of attained her L.P.N. right out of high school, instead of wasting 7 months in college, with nothing to show for it. This is just an example of kids being pressured to go to college by their peers/parents/high school staff.


The same study that was mentioned in the article, stated that students who started later in life only had a 39% graduation rate, significantly worse that those that went straight out of high school.


I agree with the other posters that parents need to do a better job of helping their children decide what they want to do with their life.
There's no guarantee that anyone will finish any post-secondary program. I just looked at the on-time and 150% of expected completion time graduation rates for several LVN/LPN programs. Most of them had less than 50% graduation rates. Another thing to pay attention to are NCLEX pass rates for each school. Some schools are better than others. You can't earn your license if you can't pass the exam.
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:19 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 1,964,598 times
Reputation: 1123
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Good points. People really need both numeracy and literacy. I've seen studies that show that the soft skills of liberal arts help you move up more quickly once you get that initial position. My wife's experience bears this out. She skyrocketed past her peers once she found something, and it had to with her liberal art background... but it took her a while to get into the starting position.

There is also a place for the communication and citizenship skills that the liberal arts provide.

A "scam" would be an intentional deception. I don't think most colleges are doing that. I majored in history and my professors & advisors actually communicated to me a "warning" message - that there were no ready-made jobs on the other side after I graduated, that I would have to intentionally sell myself in creative ways or even create my own job opportunities. They made it clear that was my responsibility, not theirs. At best they would provide me improved communication skills & literacy to make a respectable attempt. So the actual professionals are not the ones perpetuating a lie. A college department's job is to teach you thier subject to the best of their ability, not to "get you a job."

When I think of who told me things like "any college degree pays off" it was generally friends and family who didn't really know what they were talking about. Also high school teachers & counselors, who seemed to look at college as the "one ring to rule them all."
I am glad it worked out for your wife. I start a new job next week and I am hoping to eventually claw my way up from the basic Data entry role.

That being said I am impressed that your professors and advisors where straight with you regarding the marketability of the History degree. I am remember talking to the head of the English Department and it was quite "pie in the sky" for the job opportunities regarding English majors- though that was my fault for not doing my research. Plus the old saying of "A degree is better than no degree..."

And yes the hardest part for the LA grad is convincing the employer to give you that first shot. Overall I don't think LA grads are any less capable of learning and excelling when in comparison to STEM grads, nor do I think the majority of LA grads majored in Liberal Arts because he/she wanted "something easy for the next four years". The thing is it is still an employer's market and it can be hell getting that first "foot in the door" as a LA grad. And god forbid your goal is to work in something creative, breaking into that is another quagmire.
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