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Old 01-19-2018, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,718 posts, read 59,615,271 times
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Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Psychology, anthropology, and sociology are behavioral sciences. The behavioral sciences are a subset of the social sciences, but nothing days that a social science can't be STEM. As a matter of fact, the behavioral sciences are classified as STEM by the people who came up with the concept of STEM.

Psychology programs often do require biology courses. Schools sometimes have two different tracks with one requiring more biology courses.

Many life science programs do not require anything above calculus I. Some don't require calculus at all.
My daughter was a psych major. Now a PhD Candidate. She had to take three calc classes. She also had to take the same classes on proper research experimentation or whatever as all the other types of science majors. Also the same stats classes as many of the other STEM majors (now she teaches them). Obviously some STEM majors (IT and engineering for example) do not require the same research, experimentation and stats classes as scientists to be have to take. STEM is very broad and includes things like IT and information systems that are really not scientific type professions.
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Old 01-19-2018, 01:07 PM
 
6,763 posts, read 9,750,547 times
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Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
My daughter was a psych major. Now a PhD Candidate. She had to take three calc classes. She also had to take the same classes on proper research experimentation or whatever as all the other types of science majors. Also the same stats classes as many of the other STEM majors (now she teaches them). Obviously some STEM majors (IT and engineering for example) do not require the same research, experimentation and stats classes as scientists to be have to take. STEM is very broad and includes things like IT and information systems that are really not scientific type professions.
This is true. There's really not one determinant for what makes a subject STEM other than that the goal is technological advancement. If you think multiple calculus courses makes a subject STEM, then you're leaving out IT and many life science programs.

I looked at University of Texas' psychology program, and it requires calculus. Almost every psychology program requires statistics and research methods, which is actually common for most social science programs. It's not uncommon for people with social science backgrounds to be statisticians. The life sciences have more in common with physical anthropology than most other STEM subjects.
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