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Old 01-10-2018, 02:36 PM
 
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I don't think psychology by itself is a sure fire shot to a great job.
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Old 01-10-2018, 03:00 PM
 
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It depends who you ask. I think your assessment of the degree is fairly accurate.
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Old 01-10-2018, 03:40 PM
 
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What does the question in the OP have to do with the question in the subject line?

No degree is a sure fire shot to a great job. But I'll tell you what. I'd take a gritty, curious, persevering Psych major over a lazy, self-righteous STEM major, who relies on their degree alone, any day of the week. Success takes a lot more than any 'ol STEM degree. Sure, statistically speaking, you may be more likely to earn more as an average STEM grad than having only a generic undergrad degree. But I don't know where people get this strange idea that having a STEM degree sets you above the rest in terms of critical thinking and attainment of success. It's like some serious Revenge of the Nerds fantasy scenario that a group of neck beards dreamt up in their lonely dorm rooms. And I say this as someone who fell into this category when I was younger.

You can be successful with a variety of different skills and experiences given that you utilize them effectively and keep striving forward. Soft skills and politicking really come to good use in careers like Sales, Real Estate, Customer Service, Business Analysis, etc., etc., etc. I could literally name off dozens of different positions I've encountered in my 10 year career that were filled with ambitious non-STEM majors.

Last edited by Left-handed; 01-10-2018 at 03:59 PM..
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Old 01-10-2018, 04:50 PM
 
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Didn't we just have this conversation?
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Old 01-10-2018, 05:09 PM
 
527 posts, read 389,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Didn't we just have this conversation?
Every day, it feels like.
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Old 01-10-2018, 05:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Didn't we just have this conversation?
Spend enough time on the Internet, and you'll soon realize there is never enough STEM circle jerking and non-STEM bashing.

These people live in a bubble of self-righteousness.
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Old 01-10-2018, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,633 posts, read 4,391,959 times
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STEM doesnít guarantee a job. Non-STEM doesnít sentence you to a lifetime of unemployment.

STEM majors either love the field, have judged that meaningful employment is more likely with a STEM degree, or both. You can crack on that all you want talking about bubbles of self-righteousness, but thatís not self-righteous. Itís a rational reaction to available data.
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Old 01-10-2018, 08:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
STEM doesn’t guarantee a job. Non-STEM doesn’t sentence you to a lifetime of unemployment.

STEM majors either love the field, have judged that meaningful employment is more likely with a STEM degree, or both. You can crack on that all you want talking about bubbles of self-righteousness, but that’s not self-righteous. It’s a rational reaction to available data.
Well, your first sentence sums it up. And yet, the self-righteous among us still promote that idea. So what else do you call it?

Do STEM majors generally demand higher salaries? Yeah, and I don’t think anyone in the entire universe has ever tried to say otherwise. The self-righteousness comes in when they have to constantly remind non-STEM majors that they are inferior and/or bound to be failures in life when that is not true. It’d be like Art History majors jumping in to constantly bash STEM majors for being un-cultured, anti-social, virgin rubes. When you rag on others for their achievements, it seems like you’re over compensating for your own short comings. It’s like the Red Pill men who strive to become uber successful because they think that’s the only way to get laid. They think the perception of success will mask how truly awful they are as a person.

How about just making it a rule of thumb not to knock someone for their hard work and accomplishments in life? Or would that be too difficult?

Last edited by Left-handed; 01-10-2018 at 09:09 PM..
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Old 01-11-2018, 03:26 AM
 
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Most degrees don't lead directly to a job. Psychology is actually a licensed field at the doctoral level (masters or EdS for school psychology or psychological associate). The median salary for a psychologist is $75k. It's not the highest salary, but most psychologists aren't poor. In 2009, clinical psychologists had an unemployment rate of 3.8%, and this was during the recession.

However, licensure is not the STEM part of psychology; it's the healthcare part of psychology. Many psychologists working in STEM are cognitive and neuropsychologists who don't need a license.

Still, most people need a masters or doctorate in psychology to get anywhere. The same applies to chemistry and biology.
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Old 01-11-2018, 06:54 AM
 
2,244 posts, read 807,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Most degrees don't lead directly to a job. Psychology is actually a licensed field at the doctoral level (masters or EdS for school psychology or psychological associate). The median salary for a psychologist is $75k. It's not the highest salary, but most psychologists aren't poor. In 2009, clinical psychologists had an unemployment rate of 3.8%, and this was during the recession.

However, licensure is not the STEM part of psychology; it's the healthcare part of psychology. Many psychologists working in STEM are cognitive and neuropsychologists who don't need a license.

Still, most people need a masters or doctorate in psychology to get anywhere. The same applies to chemistry and biology.
And this isn't accounting for those who simply don't pursue the professional path in these fields. Often times, these majors end up in other career fields, and often times these career fields make relatively good money. I know that we have several Liberal Arts and Psych majors on this forum who have pursued a variety of different routes. One of them whom I see on the W&E forum quite often is a manager in Real Estate in the expensive Pacific NW. Yet, they are conveniently disregarded during discussions like this. We just hired a manager in our department, whose salary ranges from $73k to over $100k. Guess what her degree is in? Psychology. And no, she does not have any graduate work under her belt. Our CAO has a bachelor's degree in Geology. A guy who studied rocks in undergrad is now chief of running our administrative operations.

This silly notion that certain degrees are a death sentence is absurd. It follows the flawed logic that the degree holders are somehow incapable of picking up any additional skills, certifications, or experience to supplement their college education that helps propel them in their career. Even though this is common sense, here we are still having the same ludicrous discussions that they've been having since I graduated 10 years ago, when trolls were telling me that I'd never amount to anything. At 32, I'm already pushing the median salary for my undergrad degree (which is well above the median household income in the US), and I'm not even close to being finished in terms of pursuing additional education and career growth opportunities. The real irony here is that there is an engineer on this forum, who's much older than me, and lives in expensive CA, who has told me that I make more than he does.

Someone who has the drive and grit is probably going to be successful no matter what. Why? Because they don't give up, and the keep pushing forward. If you're not one of these types of people, then yeah, your best bet at being relatively successful is to choose the most clear cut technical career path that earns a decent living (accounting, nursing, engineering, finance, plumbing, electrician, programming, etc.). Outside of some high-level engineering fields, pretty much any average Joe can get one of these degrees and make a decent living with average effort.

Last edited by Left-handed; 01-11-2018 at 07:16 AM..
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