U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,227 posts, read 43,505,244 times
Reputation: 18679

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Resident_Crash_Lander View Post
You are correct, however I hyperfocus, so if I am truly learning from something I will not stop doing it until the day of my death. This is why I've gone from playing back in black to Arpeggios from Hell in less than three years, hyperfocus.

That is why they shouldn't give the opening to someone else, because when I hit the point where it's no longer basic education and we actually get to the point where I am learning more and more and more it will become a point of hyperfocus for me, much like my musical pursuits.

The issue is getting myself there.
Hate to go here, but have you been evaluated for ADD/ADHD? Might be "too little too late" at this point (at least for college application purposes), but you seem to be displaying many of the typical traits. I'm very similar, and was diagnosed as an adult, since it didn't have a name/treatment when I was your age. Also, like others have suggested, you might want to aim for a "lower-tiered" college than ND - then if you can prove yourself through grades and other accolades at that school, look into transferring partway.

Again, I was similar to you (except with my hyper-focus being on music and liberal arts), and despite having the intelligence to get a 4.0, I was MAYBE averaging 3.2-3.4 throughout high school. So I applied to colleges within my GPA + SAT reach, was accepted to and attended University of Oregon, and ended up transferring to a slightly better school (for a variety of reasons) after sophomore year. I then went on to graduate school, finishing with a 3.85 GPA, and have since made a nice career for myself. So you need to broaden your horizons, and meet with a guidance counselor asap. They can help you determine the best fit, and hopefully guide you on the whole process. Good luck!

FYI: Your intelligence can and hopefully will come out through written essays/applications. Write a darned good admissions essay, and they might be willing to overlook a few lower grades here & there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:21 PM
 
3,608 posts, read 1,528,741 times
Reputation: 9954
To finish up, you think you're intelligent, but you are likely to be in for a rude awakening when you see who you're competing against.


It reminds me of the guy who was the red hot high school football player, and when he got to college he was so far down the list that on the first day of practice they ran out of footballs before calling his name and he was practicing forward passes with a freaking helmet.

Or the red hot music major who found herself (so she thought) in the practice rooms next to one of the professors who must be getting things polished up for a performance - only to find out it was just another freshman.


Or all the HS valedictorians I went to university with, who found out how much they needed to learn when they got that first Calculus 101 test back and made 8 on it. Not 8 out of 10, 8 out of 100.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,822 posts, read 39,431,510 times
Reputation: 48626
It sounds like it is far more important for you to prove your work ethic, because that is where the issues lie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:48 PM
 
7,031 posts, read 3,763,479 times
Reputation: 8362
Quote:
Originally Posted by julesevar View Post
Notre Dame is not the Be all end all. Lots of "intelligent" people are denied every year. I would take the SAT and see what scores you get and apply to a range from reach to safety schools. Good luck!
This^^

You (the OP) originally asked how to prove that you're intelligent to colleges if your grades aren't straight A's.

Your SAT/ACT scores can help colleges get a better understanding of your academic potential. I'd suggest you also take three SAT Subject tests, including at least one in a subject you haven't earned stellar grades in, like English, and submit those scores for consideration. While Subject tests are not required by many schools, quite a few will consider them if they're submitted because they help round out admissions' information about the student and his/her academic potential.

Colleges (not just Notre Dame) will also look closely at your high school curriculum (the courses you've taken). Your grades are only part of the picture; colleges will also look at how challenging your high school courses have been. So, if you have the option to take Advanced Placement and honors classes - and can do well in them - do so and that will be taken into account. A student with a 3.0 GPA who has taken on a very rigorous course load will always be viewed more favorably by colleges than another student with the same GPA who only took the easiest courses available.

You can also help colleges understand your grades in other ways. For instance, most colleges will ask for recommendation letters from your teachers and school counselor. If your teachers are convinced you have as much potential as you say, then they should be happy to write strong letters for you and that may help. By the same token, your school counselor can, if you so desire, explain some of the health issues you faced that affected your grades (this will be most convincing to colleges IF you truly have improved your grades since then).

On most college applications, you'll be asked to write personal essays about your life and your interests. Many colleges also offer interviews with admissions staff. The way you handle both your essays and interviews can be another opportunity to share positives about yourself that can help overcome a lower GPA when the admissions committee is reviewing applications. (Tip: bragging that you can "manipulate" people is not going to be a plus in any college admission officers mind.)

Other factors are also considered by admissions committees that aren't always obvious. So, yes, sometimes EXCEPTIONAL students with slightly lower than average GPAs do squeak into highly selective universities like Notre Dame.

But, that is not always a good thing. Sometimes a student who just "Squeaks in" will miss out on the chance to be celebrated as a "top student" at an equally good, but not quite as selective college that is a better match for his/her interests and personality.

Getting in is only half the battle; it's really what you do after that that matters.

My thoughts on your applying to Notre Dame are perhaps a little different than others in this discussion. IF you want to take a chance and give applying to Notre Dame a try, there's no harm in doing so. The only sure way to NOT get in somewhere is to not apply at all. Put your best foot forward (especially with your letters of recommendation and essays) and see what happens. All you'll risk is the application fee.

But, at the same time, Notre Dame is only ONE of thousands of excellent colleges in the U.S. If you put your mind to it and do a little research, you should be able to find at least a dozen or so OTHER great colleges who will be thrilled to have you in their freshman class and where you can excel.

Good luck!

Last edited by RosieSD; 01-23-2018 at 09:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 03:01 AM
 
13 posts, read 6,477 times
Reputation: 47
My guidance counselor told me if I worked hard and made good grades I could get into college and pay for it with scholarships. I believed her. What a crock. I had a 4.23 GPA (took college prep classes graded on a 5.0 scale), a 1480 SAT score, and got accepted to Rose Haulman, MIT, and Norte Dame. Those are all expensive schools. I couldn't afford them. I applied to 46 different scholarships and was awarded nothing. Turns out, if you're a poor white kid with a penis attached to your body, they've got nothing for you.

So I punted. I wasn't going to be saddled with debt. I'm poor. My family's poor. I went to Purdue, slept in my car, couch surfed, and got a BS for $28k. I delivered pizzas by night and attended class by day. My grades sufferered. It sucked. My college experience was terrible. I hated every minute of it. You quickly come to understand, that unlike high school, these people aren't interested in teaching you anything. It's all about the Benjamins. University Incorporated. You're the sheep lining up for a fleecing.

My advice to you: don't be a poor white male. If you are from a wealthy family with parents that are willing to pay for your college degree, then be thankful and pick a different college. I hated Purdue, but it is a good school with a good reputation. Focus on getting good grades during your bachelors degree so you can move on to a PhD or Masters. Nobody makes any money with Bachelors degree anyway.

Lastly, if it isn't too late, learn to play the bassoon or some other weird instrument. Join the football team and learn to be a long snapper. Pick something weird that nobody does. That might just get you a full ride.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 06:38 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,063 posts, read 8,223,271 times
Reputation: 9348
Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Intelligence isn't the obstacle, "procrastination and lack of interest" is. Why would universities give you an opportunity at another's expense if you lack interest, even if you are intelligent?
This!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,737 posts, read 59,687,302 times
Reputation: 26895
Quote:
Originally Posted by User0 View Post
My guidance counselor told me if I worked hard and made good grades I could get into college and pay for it with scholarships. I believed her. What a crock. I had a 4.23 GPA (took college prep classes graded on a 5.0 scale), a 1480 SAT score, and got accepted to Rose Haulman, MIT, and Norte Dame. Those are all expensive schools. I couldn't afford them. I applied to 46 different scholarships and was awarded nothing. Turns out, if you're a poor white kid with a penis attached to your body, they've got nothing for you.

So I punted. I wasn't going to be saddled with debt. I'm poor. My family's poor. I went to Purdue, slept in my car, couch surfed, and got a BS for $28k. I delivered pizzas by night and attended class by day. My grades sufferered. It sucked. My college experience was terrible. I hated every minute of it. You quickly come to understand, that unlike high school, these people aren't interested in teaching you anything. It's all about the Benjamins. University Incorporated. You're the sheep lining up for a fleecing.

My advice to you: don't be a poor white male. If you are from a wealthy family with parents that are willing to pay for your college degree, then be thankful and pick a different college. I hated Purdue, but it is a good school with a good reputation. Focus on getting good grades during your bachelors degree so you can move on to a PhD or Masters. Nobody makes any money with Bachelors degree anyway.

Lastly, if it isn't too late, learn to play the bassoon or some other weird instrument. Join the football team and learn to be a long snapper. Pick something weird that nobody does. That might just get you a full ride.
Something is wrong here. If you had those kind of credentials, you could have easily gotten a full ride at a tier 2 or 3 school. Nless maybe you just interview terribly, or you did nothing in high school except study. If you shine, you do not need to go to a high name recognition school, especially if you are going on to grad school. If cannot stand out at a tier 2 or 3 school then you should probably look for a different career path.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,372 posts, read 25,611,927 times
Reputation: 19654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
An then you have to pay for it. $70K a year is not easy to come by for most people. Even with some scholarships you are not going to get the price down to a rational amount compared to a good public school (Say University of Michigan which is rated just a little behind Notre Dame and costs about $24K a year.)
LOL, well, I was figuring that a hot shot wiz kid that claims the ability to be able to build sophisticated electronic gadgets would have the ability to support themselves and pay the $70,000 a year to go to the school.

It sounds as though the OP has all the answers as to how the world works.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,501 posts, read 15,968,402 times
Reputation: 38894
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
To finish up, you think you're intelligent, but you are likely to be in for a rude awakening when you see who you're competing against.


It reminds me of the guy who was the red hot high school football player, and when he got to college he was so far down the list that on the first day of practice they ran out of footballs before calling his name and he was practicing forward passes with a freaking helmet.

Or the red hot music major who found herself (so she thought) in the practice rooms next to one of the professors who must be getting things polished up for a performance - only to find out it was just another freshman.


Or all the HS valedictorians I went to university with, who found out how much they needed to learn when they got that first Calculus 101 test back and made 8 on it. Not 8 out of 10, 8 out of 100.
Excellent points.

That reminds me of the HS valedictorian from my brother's class. Everyone considered him a genius during HS and he was accepted at Stanford. He ended up dropping out his freshman year because he could not keep up with his classmates. He told my brother "I thought that I was a genius until I was competing against actual geniuses for grades and other things".

Last edited by germaine2626; 01-24-2018 at 09:42 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2018, 11:39 AM
 
7,843 posts, read 11,156,945 times
Reputation: 10085
If all you are looking to do is prove that you can do the work to Notre Dame, just move there and take advanced math classes as a nonmatriculated student. You don't have to be accepted, or accepted in a program to take classes. At least you didn't used to.
Take a few classes and ace them and then apply. But don't blame anyone else if you cant do the work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top