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Old 02-15-2018, 07:51 AM
 
2 posts, read 597 times
Reputation: 12

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I am currently going to school for Bachelors in business management with a human resource certification. I have been going for 2 years, and have 2 years to go. I am currently working with United Health Care, an insurance company where I assist members contacting doctors offices and billing, and such. I am as well thinking about switching just because I am not finding myself as passionate about business management, and don't feel I have want it takes. I have always been passionate about nursing, but never pursued it. I am now thinking of switching degrees. My concern is, would it be worth switching so late into my current degree?
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Old 02-15-2018, 09:25 AM
 
9,345 posts, read 15,780,146 times
Reputation: 17142
Worth it in what respect? If you want to be a nurse, you don't have any choice in the matter.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:19 AM
 
119 posts, read 56,201 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by guzmafra View Post
I am currently going to school for Bachelors in business management with a human resource certification. I have been going for 2 years, and have 2 years to go. I am currently working with United Health Care, an insurance company where I assist members contacting doctors offices and billing, and such. I am as well thinking about switching just because I am not finding myself as passionate about business management, and don't feel I have want it takes. I have always been passionate about nursing, but never pursued it. I am now thinking of switching degrees. My concern is, would it be worth switching so late into my current degree?
GM - if you have been in school for 2 years, then I take it that you have sophomore status, correct? Usually, changing majors as a sophomore does not add a lot, if any, additional time towards degree completion. However, nursing and most other health programs are different.

My first step would be to contact the undergraduate program coordinator for the nursing program at your school and set up an appointment to meet. This person should be able to tell which of your current courses would count towards degree completion in nursing, and how much more time it would take you to complete a degree in nursing, including clinical rotations.

By all means, I would not continue in a major that you do not enjoy and/or that you think you would not be happy with in the future. Even if pursuing nursing extends college for you by a year, it may be worth it.

My best to you!
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Old 02-16-2018, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
901 posts, read 406,142 times
Reputation: 1618
Nursing is a lot of work. But if you have the passion it should be a good match.
The courses are rigorous:
* anatomy and physiology
* chemistry for allied health
* clinical training
* EHR training
* medical billing and coding

I would recommend talking to the advisors and current students. Ask them about hours per week of study
and job outlook for your area. Also look at other "non-traditional but viable" options like medical billing and coding,
electronic health records, healthcare data mining, FDA compliance engineering, etc. There are many options.

A young sophomore has youth as an advantage. I witnessed older people in their 40s burned out from careers who
were trying to switch to nursing when they were already married with children but had dead-end jobs. For them, it's
a lot harder when they have a mortgage, children, a spouse, etc. By contrast, a young undergraduate can make the
switch much more easily.

Do a job search on indeed.com with the following key words. Blog on related forums. Check Glassdoor about nursing jobs.
Also checked allied health.

Key Words:
* nursing
* EHR
* Allied Health
* FDA
* GMP
* X12
* ICD 10
* medical device
* DICOM
* SNOMED
* HL7

You should see many job options. Check it out and see if the set matches your interest then plan accordingly to switch.
Best wishes.
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Old 02-18-2018, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,276 posts, read 924,043 times
Reputation: 4974
If you don't have a passion for your major, then I would seriously consider changing it now and not getting stuck in a career that you don't enjoy and paying back loans on a degree that isn't helping you get the job you want.

I have an MBA with a focus in HR and it wasn't my first passion but long story short I was in my 30's by the time I could go back to school so business admin was the only real choice I had. Looking back, I would have been smarter to go into a skilled trade or something. Yes, my degree has helped me out in terms of getting employers' interests but work is just work.

Look into nursing a bit more before you leap but definitely explore it if it is a potential interest. Nursing is a high demand occupation but it is challenging in terms of curriculum and the work itself is not a cakewalk Nurses can take multiple career paths and I've known nurses who have moved into nursing education, ones who work as nurse practitioners, and some who are nurse managers. Others are happy working in patient care.

I hope that you find the answer to what you are looking for.
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Old 02-20-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,795,031 times
Reputation: 31371
Quote:
Originally Posted by guzmafra View Post
I am currently going to school for Bachelors in business management with a human resource certification. I have been going for 2 years, and have 2 years to go. I am currently working with United Health Care, an insurance company where I assist members contacting doctors offices and billing, and such. I am as well thinking about switching just because I am not finding myself as passionate about business management, and don't feel I have want it takes. I have always been passionate about nursing, but never pursued it. I am now thinking of switching degrees. My concern is, would it be worth switching so late into my current degree?
I'm an RN (BSN) and I'd say go for it if that's what you want. Unlike some others on here, I'll tell you it may require you to go at least an extra year. It somewhat depends on what you've taken these past two years. Each school has slightly different requirements but in general you'll have to take some basic science courses (chemistry, biology, anat and phys), also usually psychology both general and developmental. I'd recommend talking to an advisor at your school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
Nursing is a lot of work. But if you have the passion it should be a good match.
The courses are rigorous:
* anatomy and physiology
* chemistry for allied health
* clinical training
* EHR training
* medical billing and coding

I would recommend talking to the advisors and current students. Ask them about hours per week of study
and job outlook for your area. Also look at other "non-traditional but viable" options like medical billing and coding,
electronic health records, healthcare data mining, FDA compliance engineering, etc. There are many options.

A young sophomore has youth as an advantage. I witnessed older people in their 40s burned out from careers who
were trying to switch to nursing when they were already married with children but had dead-end jobs. For them, it's
a lot harder when they have a mortgage, children, a spouse, etc. By contrast, a young undergraduate can make the
switch much more easily.

Do a job search on indeed.com with the following key words. Blog on related forums. Check Glassdoor about nursing jobs.
Also checked allied health.

Key Words:
* nursing
* EHR
* Allied Health
* FDA
* GMP
* X12
* ICD 10
* medical device
* DICOM
* SNOMED
* HL7

You should see many job options. Check it out and see if the set matches your interest then plan accordingly to switch.
Best wishes.
A nursing student will not have to take coding. That's not part of the job. I don't know how they integrate the EHR into nursing school. There are many different systems in use, and many different ways to use them, too. Some schools now require student nurses to take a CNA (certified nursing assistant) course, which teaches the stuff we got in "fundamentals of nursing" all those years ago, e.g. bedmaking, water-pitcher filling, catheter care, etc. That's usually one semester.
Front Range Community College*-*Nurse Aide Certificate

I'd stick with nursing on the search.
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Old 02-20-2018, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,549 posts, read 8,004,288 times
Reputation: 6273
My degree is in HR, I work in HR, I hold two advanced certifications in HR and I hire and work with Nurses every day. No question in my mind, there is no way I would ever be a nurse. HR is a much better fit for me.

The work sucks, the hours suck (lots of nights, weekends, and evenings), you don't control your day, you must be replaced if you want time off, etc.

I respect nurses and the work they do but I would never want to be one.
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Old 02-25-2018, 05:36 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,785 posts, read 9,705,627 times
Reputation: 10783
If your passion is in nursing, you should go for it. As an RN I will tell you passion for the work is the main criteria for getting through nursing school and also being successful in the field once you graduate. I’ve worked with plenty of nurses who hold bachelors degrees in other fields (criminal justice, psychology, computer science, the arts, etc) and went back to school to become RNs because they weren’t fulfilled by the degree/career path they originally attained.
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