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Old 04-07-2018, 10:09 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,163 times
Reputation: 20

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Before I explain my situation, I understand that this is all my fault, so I really don't need to hear that in the comments.

When I was in high school, I was excelled in math, and even got a reputation for being a math whiz. When picking a major in college, it seemed like a no-brainer to me. I picked pure mathematics as my major because I thought there was no reason that I wouldn't do well in it in college when I had well in it in high school. Well, I was proven wrong by the end of my sophomore year.

In high school, math was mainly about computations and memorizing formulas, whereas college math is mainly theory-based and almost all proofs. At the end of my sophomore year, I knew I ought to change majors, but that would have meant taking a fifth year, which I really didn't want to do. So I decided that I would just double my efforts. However, the classes become even more theory-based, and I continued to barely scrape by. I ended up just barely good-enough grades to get my degree.

I've been out of college for almost a year, and I have yet to get a stable full-time job with my degree. Right now, I've just been shuffling through minimum-wage part-time jobs as a math tutor. I've applied for jobs and indeed and zip-recruiter, but I never hear back from them, and I know it's because of my weak qualifications. I don't expect to get a super-high-paying job(at-least not right now). The moment I graduated, I was willing to settle for a $20/hr full-time job, with the possibility of working my up slowly, but surely. But even getting to the bottom of the ladder is proving hard.

I've ruled out the possibility of getting a Master's Degree, because the gpa I would be required to maintain in the graduate program is one I did not achieve as an undergrad, and I would just be wasting more of my family's money. I might go back to school years later as a part-time student, but right now, I just need to work.

Like I said, I don't need to be told that this is my own fault, because I already know that. I just want to know what I would have to do right now to get $20/hr full-time job with my math degree. I just want to be able to afford a 1-bedroom apartment right now, and start paying my parents back for my college education.
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:37 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,716 posts, read 64,203,456 times
Reputation: 68523
Honestly, this seems to be a no-brainer. If you enjoy doing calculations, and you're good at that aspect of math, why not get a CPA certificate? It might be perfect for you, and you'd be able to put your negative college experience behind you. Try to pull out of the frustration and despair, and think positively and constructively about the future. You have options, OP. Good luck!
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:50 AM
 
6,747 posts, read 2,623,927 times
Reputation: 18310
Nothing here is "your fault". You're 23 and you haven't quite launched yet and found your footing.

Doesn't your university have a career counseling center you can rely for help with a career? Surely they have something in mind when they offer a degree in Math.

Can you get a teaching certificate and teach math at the high school or middle school level?
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale
905 posts, read 407,644 times
Reputation: 1620
Quote:
Originally Posted by crosspairnatural View Post
Before I explain my situation, I understand that this is all my fault, so I really don't need to hear that in the comments.

When I was in high school, I was excelled in math, and even got a reputation for being a math whiz. When picking a major in college, it seemed like a no-brainer to me. I picked pure mathematics as my major because I thought there was no reason that I wouldn't do well in it in college when I had well in it in high school. Well, I was proven wrong by the end of my sophomore year.

In high school, math was mainly about computations and memorizing formulas, whereas college math is mainly theory-based and almost all proofs. At the end of my sophomore year, I knew I ought to change majors, but that would have meant taking a fifth year, which I really didn't want to do. So I decided that I would just double my efforts. However, the classes become even more theory-based, and I continued to barely scrape by. I ended up just barely good-enough grades to get my degree.

I've been out of college for almost a year, and I have yet to get a stable full-time job with my degree. Right now, I've just been shuffling through minimum-wage part-time jobs as a math tutor. I've applied for jobs and indeed and zip-recruiter, but I never hear back from them, and I know it's because of my weak qualifications. I don't expect to get a super-high-paying job(at-least not right now). The moment I graduated, I was willing to settle for a $20/hr full-time job, with the possibility of working my up slowly, but surely. But even getting to the bottom of the ladder is proving hard.

I've ruled out the possibility of getting a Master's Degree, because the gpa I would be required to maintain in the graduate program is one I did not achieve as an undergrad, and I would just be wasting more of my family's money. I might go back to school years later as a part-time student, but right now, I just need to work.

Like I said, I don't need to be told that this is my own fault, because I already know that. I just want to know what I would have to do right now to get $20/hr full-time job with my math degree. I just want to be able to afford a 1-bedroom apartment right now, and start paying my parents back for my college education.
I empathize with your situation. I had the same situation when I graduated into a recession back in the early 1990s. I had to live with my parents, and the job search was just one rejection after another. At the time though, I did not realize there was a "back door" solution to getting a good job quickly - community college.

If I knew at age 22 what I know now, I would have just gotten a quick associate's degree in something in huge demand. In the early 1990s, that would have been radiography, medical billing, computer networking, general programming, etc.

Your math degree is very useful in computer science. I would just get a 2nd bachelor's in computer science at an inexpensive four-year college or an associate's and do a huge amount of programming combined with discrete math: Python, Java, mobile apps, algorithms, databses, etc. All those programming courses use "discrete math" and you alread have a strong basis.

As an example, let's say a UF graduate in Gainesville, FL graduated with a 2.5 in math. He or she was mostly in a rigorous curriculum with students who had perfect or near-perfect SATs. The hard courses led to the 2.5. There were sporadic "As" but not enough to maintain a high g.p.a. Such a student could easily get a 2nd bachelor's at someplace like Miami Dade College, Seminole State, etc. for a field in demand. The gpa would likely go very high too.

If I were in your situation, I would at least get a quick associate's degree in computer science and build off of discrete math into programming and algorithms. You would excel in growth functions like Big O.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj59L-_7V70

Discrete math uses proofs. It is the mathematical basis for computer science and general programming or data anlytics. The demand is huge right now for computer science.
https://www.cse.buffalo.edu/~rapapor...sdiscmath.html

Check jobs on dice.com or indeed.com
* Java
* mobile apps
* Python
* data analytics
* algorithms
* SDET
* database
* SQL
* iOS
* REST services
* Cloud Computing
* AWS
* microservices
* Hadoop

The list goes on. Your math background can be "pivoted" to go deep into discrete math and the world of compute science-related jobs above at high pay and demand.

Your undergraduate credits can easily transfer into a computer science program for a 2nd bachelor's or quick associate's degree. The jobs are there for the taking. Just go for it.
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:15 AM
 
5,761 posts, read 3,043,495 times
Reputation: 15097
Not sure what you are looking for, but there are relatively few jobs that are Mathematics at the BS level. So the next step is what jobs/careers make use of math. A couple have been mentioned. As well as pretty much most business and finance job, ops research, and the hot one today, analytics. While you might need to take some additional training in the specific field, you will also need to package your resume for each job to highlight those skills most appropriate. Don't expect HR to be able to translate "mathematics is good for analytics" because HR has no clue what is required for either. Make it easy for them to make the connection.
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Old 04-07-2018, 04:27 PM
 
10,710 posts, read 20,133,318 times
Reputation: 9859
Why didn't you zero in on what careers you were interested in before going to college and struggling at a major that you were not very successful at and have no career prospects in?!? From reading your posts you realized early on and still didn't stop and reevaluate.

OP you need to figure out what you want to do in order to focus on obtaining the qualifications for it and excelling in that field. You put the cart before the horse.
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Old 04-07-2018, 09:38 PM
 
5,761 posts, read 3,043,495 times
Reputation: 15097
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
Why didn't you zero in on what careers you were interested in before going to college and struggling at a major that you were not very successful at and have no career prospects in?!? ....
I suspect because at 17 most folks don't know enough to know what careers are out there. And most high school guidance counselors simply have no clue and can't provide good advice. More likely provide poor advice to most students. This isn't an uncommon thing and one reason why so many students change majors and add a semester to a year to college.
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:31 PM
 
67 posts, read 52,150 times
Reputation: 98
If I were you I would try to narrow your focus and at least make it *seem* like you're looking for something specific. I would make a cover letter and tailor your resume to highlight anything you've done (internships, summer jobs, volunteering) that would reinforce your potential in that area.

For example, say you want to get into HR. Your cover letter would explain that you're interested in HR and helping companies recruit and retain talent through solid payroll and benefits management. (Or something - I'm making this up but you should do some research on any field you think might be of interest)

Then identify organizations - companies, nonprofits, tap your networks of friends, parents' friends, people you've babysat for in the past, neighbors. Anyone could be the lead you're looking for but you have to put yourself out there.

Ask for informational interviews. Say you're interested in learning about their field and wondering if you could have a few minutes of their time/buy them coffee/pick their brain. When you meet, ask questions about their job responsibilities, a typical day, how they got into it. Follow up with a thank you email and your resume. If they give you other people to contact, follow through in contacting them. Then follow up with everyone with periodic updates, thank them for their past advice, say you wanted to keep in touch. Think of your network like a houseplant and tend to it with loving care every day. You never know where your next job or important contact will come from.

People like to help people who are just out of college and trying to get a foot in the door. Nothing is beneath you at this point.

Also - what about bank telling? Seems like something were you start at the bottom but there's room for advancement.
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:50 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,716 posts, read 64,203,456 times
Reputation: 68523
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Nothing here is "your fault". You're 23 and you haven't quite launched yet and found your footing.

Doesn't your university have a career counseling center you can rely for help with a career? Surely they have something in mind when they offer a degree in Math.

Can you get a teaching certificate and teach math at the high school or middle school level?
This, OP (bolded). Go back to your university, and see a career counselor. It's a free service.
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Old 04-08-2018, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert, AZ
2,847 posts, read 1,166,193 times
Reputation: 6060
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Honestly, this seems to be a no-brainer. If you enjoy doing calculations, and you're good at that aspect of math, why not get a CPA certificate? It might be perfect for you, and you'd be able to put your negative college experience behind you. Try to pull out of the frustration and despair, and think positively and constructively about the future. You have options, OP. Good luck!

Uh, when did you pass the CPA exam?
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