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Old 04-06-2008, 06:25 PM
 
204 posts, read 1,102,042 times
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I think I may be hanging out with too many overachievers. I know that a good college gpa means better employment and greater chances at a good grad school. BUT.....if you dont plan to go to grad school and are not getting into a very competitve field what is a good gpa? A good enough gpa to land a job? I dozed off this last semester because all of my classes were electives that didnt count toward my degree. I think I may be getting my second C. What gpa did you graduate with?
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Old 04-06-2008, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
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A good GPA is usually around 3.5, but all employers look at GPA differently. Doing bad in electives reflects on your work ethic more than anything.
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Old 04-06-2008, 09:43 PM
 
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I think a "good" GPA is very subjective. Why don't you ask the advisors at your university this question.
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Old 04-06-2008, 09:46 PM
 
204 posts, read 1,102,042 times
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I will ask around to the advisors. Im just finding it difficult to concentrate because they upper level electives for me but are degree courses for other students. So im writing 10 page papers on anthrolopgy and studying anatomy diagrams for speech pathology and yada yada. Im spreading myself too thin on subjects Im not going in to, and classes that set up for students in the field. None of my subjects overlap as they do with a typical profession course load.
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Old 04-06-2008, 09:59 PM
 
25,170 posts, read 34,023,469 times
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10 pages on anthropology. Ugh, that sounds awful. Why did you have to take that? It is weird.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Ray View Post
I will ask around to the advisors. Im just finding it difficult to concentrate because they upper level electives for me but are degree courses for other students. So im writing 10 page papers on anthrolopgy and studying anatomy diagrams for speech pathology and yada yada. Im spreading myself too thin on subjects Im not going in to, and classes that set up for students in the field. None of my subjects overlap as they do with a typical profession course load.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:26 PM
 
204 posts, read 1,102,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artsyguy View Post
10 pages on anthropology. Ugh, that sounds awful. Why did you have to take that? It is weird.


To keep my scholarship I had to take 12 hours and I cannot take any more upper level business courses until I finish an accounting class. So, I took the accounting class and had to take upper level electives to qualify for the scholarship. It was a big mistake. I should have taken the accounting class over the summer by itself.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:28 PM
 
25,170 posts, read 34,023,469 times
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why is accounting a problem? or a lot to cover?

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Originally Posted by Terry Ray View Post
To keep my scholarship I had to take 12 hours and I cannot take any more upper level business courses until I finish an accounting class. So, I took the accounting class and had to take upper level electives to qualify for the scholarship. It was a big mistake. I should have taken the accounting class over the summer by itself.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,480 posts, read 2,911,169 times
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You know what they call the guy who graduates at the bottom of Med school?

They call him doctor.

How many employers are really looking for your GPA?
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Old 04-06-2008, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Camberville
7,088 posts, read 8,762,494 times
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I've always been told that most employers don't really look at your GPA, unless you're going into investment banking. Some jobs require you to have had above a 2.5 or 3.0, but rarely does it seem to be higher than that. Also, your internships and leadership roles tend to be more important than your GPA, unless you flunked out. :P

I went to my career advisor in tears at the beginning of this semester (2nd semester sophomore) because my GPA is a 3.2. To me, the girl who had a 3.9 unweighted in high school while doing it ALL, I thought it was the end of the world. It's not. I learned the hard way that sometimes you really *can't* take on the world by yourself. My freshman year I took 5 classes one semester and 6 the other, was diagnosed with a chronic illness and several food allergies, dealing with depression due to a really horrible roommate who was nothing short of a bully, and dealing with my father's unemployment and illness. Considering all of those things, it's pretty amazing that I didn't jump off the roof of my building, much less manage not to fail a single class. Sure, I shed plenty of tears over that C+ and the two B-s I got, but that's life. Don't spread yourself too thin if you don't have to. While my classes are all in the same vein, my activities and emotions in general were all over the place. It's the same problem if your courses are all over the place. Try to plan courses that complement each other.. it really makes your life a lot easier.

I also really reject the idea that some majors are "soft" or "easier" and therefore expectations for GPAs should be different. Sure, pre- med is very difficult. However, many of those science minded premed students would find writing 4 15-20 page papers on Afro-China relations and other development issues in one class for a semester just as difficult as I would find orgo problem sets. Just because a major is based more on reading and writing than on problem sets and experiments doesn't mean it's easier.. it just requires a different thought process.
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Old 04-06-2008, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,468 posts, read 14,425,129 times
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It is not necessary to include your GPA on a resume unless it somehow relates to a personal achievement--such as you flunked out of high school only to attend college later in life and managed a 3.6 while raising two children. Other then that, it is no one's business.

However, it may be critical for employment in certain management or business settings.
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